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Thread: sound proof enclosure for air compressor and dust collector question.

  1. #16
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    My shop has a loft connected to one side that's about 8ft tall. I think what i'll do is make a hallow wall made with studs and plywood, with about 6'' of insulation stuffed inside of it. then move those around the compressor which is placed in the very corner of the shop. Think of it like a welding shield that welders put up that makes it so people nearby don't hurt their eyes, only in this case it's from noise.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    My shop has a loft connected to one side that's about 8ft tall. I think what i'll do is make a hallow wall made with studs and plywood, with about 6'' of insulation stuffed inside of it. then move those around the compressor which is placed in the very corner of the shop. Think of it like a welding shield that welders put up that makes it so people nearby don't hurt their eyes, only in this case it's from noise.
    You might consider getting a sound meter to help evaluate the noise reduction. There are a bunch available on amazon some are very cheap. This is the one I have:
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000EWY67W


    JKJ

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    You might consider getting a sound meter to help evaluate the noise reduction.


    JKJ
    I just use an iPhone app to look at things. I'm sure it won't win accuracy awards, but it's good for seeing effect of different methods of soundproofing.

    Armstrong Ceiling Solutions has an iPhone app for this (Armstrong Sound Level Meter). Can't remember if it was free or not
    - I have enough frequent flyer miles to orbit the sun. Sigh...
    - After I ask a stranger if I can pet their dog and they say yes, I like to respond, "I'll keep that in mind" and walk off.
    - When you earnestly believe you can compensate for lack of skill by doubling your effort, there's no end to what you can't do

  4. #19
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    Another thing that can help is actually planning for general noise abatement in the shop. While I'm not suggesting that everyone put in a full ceiling with acoustic tile like I did, I can honestly say, it RADICALLY transformed the noise levels in my shop because of how it killed reflections from hard surfaces. Everyone can take advantage of this concept by putting in some sound absorbing panels or whatever. Many places like retail and restaurants that embraced the "open ceiling" concept found they have to do this to make the space even remotely pleasant for folks to be in there and that was with the primary noise source being people's mouths rather than machinery. My ceiling combined with the closet for the compressor and DC makes for a very pleasant environment to work in.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #20
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    Yeah Jim There is a pizza place and a sandwich shop I go to and the ceilings are like 30ft high. You can't hear anything the person says because it just echoes. Inthink they have that grey popcorn spray insulation.

  6. #21
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    And it's actually not an echo it's hard to describe, it's like you're hearing the person's voice go around the room instead if towards you.

  7. #22
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  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    And it's actually not an echo it's hard to describe, it's like you're hearing the person's voice go around the room instead if towards you.
    Technically, it's an echo, or actually, a number of echos. An echo is a reflection that is delayed in time from the original sound, all based on the difference. Sounds, electromagnetic waves like radar, light, waves on water, etc. Echoes can cause problems when they reflect undesirably, for example bounce back down an electrical line from some interface.

    A shout from a mountain top that comes back from another mountain or clift of the proper shape and at a good distance can have a primary reflected sound so strong you can hear a repeat of the word or phrase you shout. You can often hear an echo from the bottom of a deep well.

    An echo inside an irregular cave can produce an incredible reverb because so many sound waves are coming back at very close intervals - it can sound beautiful. (We experienced amazing sound from a friend playing hymns on a trumpet in a cave that was the most incredible thing I've heard in my life.) Concert halls and large auditoriums are designed to carefully control the echos from various surfaces, amplifying and suppressing reflections from carefully constructed surfaces built at precise angles and curves. Hard surfaces bounce sound sound waves efficiently. Soft surfaces absorb sound. Curved and angled surfaces can focus or direct sounds. The conflicting delays in times of arrivals can create auditory confusion.

    A large room with flat, hard surfaces can create so many conflicting echos they can interfere with clear sound. Yes, the sound may "go around the room" by bouncing from a variety of surfaces before it reaches your ears. A poor "chamber" can in fact be unpleasant, especially with multiple sound sources.

    There is much information available on echos. This is a simple overview: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echo

    JKJ

  9. #24
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    Sep 2016
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    rockwool insulation is the only one rated to be left exposed and not burn. The glue in fiberglass insulation burns. I would line the enclosure with rockwool batts to soak up the sound. Roxul makes "safe and sound" designed to soak up noise inside a wall.
    Bill D.

    https://www.rockwool.com/products/sa...AE%20downloads

  10. #25
    I've used the Roxul, the company makes 2 products that are packaged too much alike. One is for insulation, and the
    other for sound. Read the labels.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    I've used the Roxul, the company makes 2 products that are packaged too much alike. One is for insulation, and the
    other for sound. Read the labels.
    I am not really convinced they are any different. The sound one has no insulation "R" rating value. The "R" rated one is better then fiberglass per inch. I wonder if the sound rated one is the same as fiberglass as far as "R"rating? For some reason in California, home of energy saving government policies, there is no R15 fiberglass only R13.
    Bill D

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I am not really convinced they are any different.
    STC testing shows there is a difference, though I don't think it's huge.

  13. #28
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    FWIW, rockwool was unobtanium a couple months ago.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  14. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    FWIW, rockwool was unobtanium a couple months ago.
    Then I would use the ground up news paper stuff, "dense packed" in plastic bags. More work but cheaper and more
    effective.

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