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Thread: having 1000 pound equipment delivered?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    286

    having 1000 pound equipment delivered?

    How do you guys move things like this into your shop, especially when you're out in the country and don't even have concrete driveways to easily roll it into the shop? A lot of times when you buy something they just drop it off at the end of your driveway supposedly.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    286
    As ridiculous as it sounds, it really does sound like a forklift would make a great 2nd hand helper. I mean when you have a shop with 10 different tools that all weight a minimum of 500 pounds a piece, ocassionally you want to move them around. It would have to be a pneamatic tire forklift though to be able to drive on the crushed concrete. Luckily that is pretty solid.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    54,160
    I can't get large trucks into my property because of a sharp, 90ļ turn in the driveway, so big stuff I either pick up at the terminal on my trailer or do a transfer from a semi to a roll-back in a parking lot nearby. The latter is how I handled my CNC machine...$100 and that big crate was right at my shop door.



    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    971
    I use an automotive engine lift. I have a jig I made that's an H shape with a chain in each corner. It's adjustable in multiple ways. About the only thing it doesn't work on is tall stuff like the bandsaw. Otherwise it works well and it's narrow enough to get through a 36" door. I modified the folding legs on the engine lift to maximize the space between them. When I lift something up I slide 2x4s on top of the legs and rest the tool on it so it can't sway when moving. For dirt/ gravel I have some old sheet of plywood.

    I'm currently using my basement that a vehicle can't access the door but a side by side pulling a small trailer can. The walk out basement door is about a foot above the ground which turns out to be very close to the height of the back of the trailer. So when bringing stuff into the basement I back the trailer up to the door, slide some plywood between the floor and the deck of the trailer, and then the engine lift works perfectly. My real shop (some day) is an unused cabin that's on piers about 3' above the ground. I haven't used it yet because I need to put a deck on it for bringing in tools and remove the two posts in the center so it'll be wide open inside.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    767
    Typically, a trailer and a pallet jack is how i move 90% of the machines that show up. Gravel complicates the pallet jack slightly, but depending on how compacted the gravel is, the jack should roll moderately well. You could always overlap OSB sheets and leap from them as you drag the tool into your shop. Ive seen guys do that on their yards. I just moved a 1500+/- lb table saw last week, and it would have been a challenge on loose gravel. On asphalt/concrete it was pretty easy.

  6. #6
    I live in a suburb, but my concrete driveway has a 25% grade.... I have hired a rigging crew for my heavy tools - worth every penny.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Longmont, CO
    Posts
    631
    5020.jpg

    and a strap or chain. i have forks for the 3 point as well.

  8. #8
    this one was too heavy for the bob cat so he went back for this. What a beautiful machine

    P1040615A.jpg

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,749
    I use a trailer, chain hoist and pallet jack.
    I have a cement driveway and a cracked up slab thanks to my live oak tree.
    Aj

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
    Posts
    2,094
    Hiring actual riggers who have both skill and the correct equipment is by far the easiest and safest approach, albeit expensive. I've moved plenty of way too big things with a combination of comealongs, hoists, Johnson bars, piano dollies, and all the other tools of the trade. I've never gotten a forklift license, so haven't used one of those. DW has pretty much put a halt to my heavy moving, at least for the over 500 lb category, and I can't say I'm too unhappy.

    Yes, where I live it costs $800 to get the competent guys just to show up; they get most jobs done in under that initial hour and aren't too fussy about billing for a few minutes over (and they do bring their crane, just in case). Also where I live a consult with the orthopod and a course of PT will trivially run up that much of a bill; that's only if you're lucky and the injury is minor. After the time I spent a month with back pain that made it too agonizing to get to the toilet I thought that enough was probably enough. I only had to do it twice more before the lesson sank in.

    I know money is hard to come by, but so is health. It just takes one momentary slip.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    6,031
    You gotta make do. You can always get a pallet jack and a couple/few sheets of plywood and leapfrog. If itís uphill, use a come along attached to a tree. Assuming you donít rent bigger equipment.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    1,903
    Yup, definitely a roll back. Had 3,000 pounds of Hapfo copy lathe brought to my garage. The 2,000 main lathe didn't want to slide and had to work to get it off, but the 1,000 extension slid like a dream.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Coastal Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,191
    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    Hiring actual riggers who have both skill and the correct equipment is by far the easiest and safest approach, albeit expensive.

    Also where I live a consult with the orthopod and a course of PT will trivially run up that much of a bill; that's only if you're lucky and the injury is minor. After the time I spent a month with back pain that made it too agonizing to get to the toilet I thought that enough was probably enough. I only had to do it twice more before the lesson sank in.

    I know money is hard to come by, but so is health. It just takes one momentary slip.
    Lotsa fence leaners give the opposing counsel.

    A couple weeks in traction make hiring pros look cheap.

    There's a reason pain and suffering awards have such a high dollar value attached.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Winterville, NC (eastern NC)
    Posts
    2,097
    Every machine in my shop was moved by myself with a combination of leverage and cheap Harbor Freight furniture dollies. The delivery driver used a pallet jack to unload my Hammer J/P machine to the end of my driveway and sat it there. I rented a pallet jack, laid some el-cheapo plywood on the grassy back yard and leaf-frogged the pallet jack/machine over the plywood to the shop in the back yard.
    When my Laguna sliding table saw was delivered I asked to be allowed to pick it up at the freight terminal. Rented a U-Haul trailer and moved it to my shop, where I placed the machine on the dollies and moved it into the shop. Using 2 X 4 and a crow bar I lowered the machine in its permanent place in the shop. This machine weighs 1000 lbs.
    Use of brains and leverage has saved my back many times.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Lancaster, Ohio
    Posts
    475
    bought my 980 lb, 15" wide belt sander (with my right foot in a non weight bearing cast) wife drove the pickup
    was loaded with a forklift by the guy I bought it from
    $75 to local lawn care firm got it out of pickup and in garage, used a Skid Steer with forks
    $300 to a local moving company got it down in the basement where I wanted it and the small drum sander up and out in the garage
    beat the pants off of disassembling it, moving parts down and then reassembling
    will gladly pay $300 again when time to move my new jointer or jointer/planer down to basement shop

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