Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 48

Thread: Veritas LA/BU planes or Custom planes?

  1. #1

    Veritas LA/BU planes or Custom planes?

    Im considering upgrading my single plane to more dedicated 4,5,7 planes.

    Im currently used to a #4, but I have to large hands for it, so was first thinking of upgrading to a 4 1/2.

    But.. then again I am wondering if I should go for the Low Angle / Bevel up planes or the "Custom" Veritas planes.

    All of them have much more room for my hands.. but Im not sure which is "better". Anybody have extensive use with both?

    The Veritas LA/BU are the same.. just different name for it?
    The Veritas Customs are Bevel Down..

    Both have "freestanding" handle and adjustable mouth.


    Im also finally getting a dedicated shooting plane, so that won't be a consideration this time.


    Veritas has 3 different LA/BU smoothers... what a mess. Im considering the LA one of them.
    Could anybody tell me what is the difference between these 3 are??
    Last edited by Dan Kraakenes; 08-06-2020 at 2:49 PM.

  2. #2
    Three LV LA smoothing planes: small #3, medium #4 and large #4 1/2. Pick the size that fits your work, your hands should be ok anyhow. The larger one blades are the same size as the jack’s or the jointer’s. It could be nice to swap blades.

    You can’t really go wrong with LV LA planes.
    Last edited by Jerome Andrieux; 08-06-2020 at 3:03 PM. Reason: Checked, may —> are

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,537
    Dan, I did a major review of these planes here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ToolRev...omPlanes1.html

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    700
    The advantage to a bevel-down plane is you can use a chip-breaker. (Setting it requires some skill, but it's the ultimate tear-out control mechanism.) LV has some non-custom BD planes too. (Also, for LV money LN BD planes are in play.) A lot is feel and personal preference.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    608
    The BU tote style, hated and loved in probably equal numbers.is particularly well suited to large hands. Said totes are available on the custom plane series. For my hands (considered large @ 4.25" across) these totes are infinitely more comfortable than a Stanley tote. Others disagree.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    20,599
    The BU / BD debate may take you off track of what you are asking. Whether my hands are large or small would not determine my use of a narrower or wider iron (No 4 versus No 4-1/2). If the No 4 is crowded for your hands the tote config on the Custom No 4 may solve that. Since you are used to BD/chip breaker planes you may want to stick with that. I have both and use them differently. A BU with a steep angle and a BD with a close chip breaker can both handle tough figure. I like the result of the close chip breaker on most figured woods but, would not want to choose my 'users' based on the exception rather than on the rule.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Coastal Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,065
    Regardless of your eventual choice, the upcharge for PM V-11 steel is worthwhile.

  8. #8
    Buying a bevel up smoother is like buying a tricycle. Yes, it works. Yes it is easier to learn. No, it is not what you want in the long run. No, you don't want to spend hundreds of dollars on it.

    Buying a double iron plane is like a bicycle: a better long term investment.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Lubbock, Tx
    Posts
    1,072
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Mickley View Post
    Buying a bevel up smoother is like buying a tricycle. Yes, it works. Yes it is easier to learn. No, it is not what you want in the long run. No, you don't want to spend hundreds of dollars on it.

    Buying a double iron plane is like a bicycle: a better long term investment.
    so what would a unicycle be?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    9,123
    Single iron wood body....with a tapered iron, at that.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    700
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Wilkins View Post
    so what would a unicycle be?
    I'm going with chisel. (I'm sure, with enough skill, you can flatten and smooth a board with one!)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    22,127
    Blog Entries
    1
    Whether my hands are large or small would not determine my use of a narrower or wider iron (No 4 versus No 4-1/2).
    A #4-1/2 is a slightly longer plane. In the Stanley/Bailey design, not only is there a bit more space, the tote is also larger.

    so what would a unicycle be?
    A standard angle bevel up block plane? That or a side rabbet plane.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 08-07-2020 at 1:41 AM.
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #13
    So..
    Custom BD for more experienced.
    Chipbreaker - a bit more cumbersome sharpening.


    BU/LA for beginners or a lot of tropical wood.
    No shipbreaker - faster and easier sharpening

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    SE Mass.
    Posts
    186
    Maybe I'm one of the great unwashed, but I don't get the BU stuff. I compared my #7 Record with a LV #7 BU on some tricky white oak. Both blades sharpened together and similarly. Tearout difference was night and day. Admittedly, I know my Record well, but still, I could not get the BU jointer to come anywhere close. I later learned that it would have done better with a steeper-ground blade. It seems one needs to get several blades for each BU plane.
    That said, I do get tearout occasionally with my BD planes, but have learned to either clean it up with a scraper or sand it out.
    Last edited by Josko Catipovic; 08-07-2020 at 7:00 AM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dickinson, Texas
    Posts
    7,245
    Blog Entries
    1
    Google "Bedrock Planes". I have a set of them and they are really great.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •