Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 49

Thread: Was it just my imagination?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    22,130
    Blog Entries
    1

    Was it just my imagination?

    Was there a recent post on the "Unicorn Edge" or some such?

    Having looked at another forum to see what this was about, it was put on a back burner to give a try.

    Finally had a plane blade to give it a try.

    It did provide a very good edge able to make an incredibly thin shaving on a piece of pine.

    Though there is a possibility this could be done in a way to be detrimental to the edge, like all sharpening that is a matter of the person being in control of things.

    My question, was there ever an explanation of choosing "Unicorn Edge" as a name or was it just an obvious choice for the likelihood of ever seeing one?

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Belden, Mississippi
    Posts
    2,730
    Lots of response to the process. Vids as well. Might wanna check it out when ya have the time.
    On the other hand, I still have five fingers.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    So. Fla
    Posts
    255
    It was first called the Weaver Bevel, after David Weaver, who was the one who tried out the concept and posted about it. Later he felt uncomfortable with having his name attached to the concept and proposed the name Unicorn Profile because it was like chasing one and never seeing it. He had also mentioned that carvers may have been using this concept in their sharpening method(s).

    +1 on what Bill said.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    22,130
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill White View Post
    Lots of response to the process. Vids as well. Might wanna check it out when ya have the time.
    Yes, some of my time was spent watching David's video.

    Did someone start a thread on the subject on SMC?

    Also, has anyone else here given it a go?

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    700
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    ... Did someone start a thread on the subject on SMC? ...
    Jim, it's been mentioned (at least) a couple times here:

    Bevels

    Pm-v11 at 20*

    Question re: Power Stropping with a buffing Wheel

    Wheels for Grinder? Gee Whilickers. Which ones?

    Derek, in the latest (fourth) link, describes trying it and the success he's had.

    I'd suggest the discussion is better not further fragmented. If fact I hope there is a summary article written once all the various research threads run their course. It's really hard to keep track of what works and what doesn't (and when and where) right now.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    22,130
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks David, it seems like all the threads have been leading to various shades of sharpening lately.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Posts
    81
    There is a good thread on the subject over at the Australian forum under the subforum "sharpening".
    Last edited by scott lipscomb; 08-05-2020 at 3:42 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    22,130
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by scott lipscomb View Post
    There is a good thread on the subject over at the Australian forum under the subform "sharpening".
    Thanks Scott, if time allows me it will be visited.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #9
    Jim - Winston Chang has a great video on using the buffer for the unicorn edge. Here's a link: https://vimeo.com/444232624

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    22,130
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Rathhaus View Post
    Jim - Winston Chang has a great video on using the buffer for the unicorn edge. Here's a link: https://vimeo.com/444232624
    Thanks Eric, instead of watching videos my buffing wheel was set up on my lathe to give this a whirl. Yesterday it was quite successful with a blade from a #3. Today it was tried on a #4-1/2 blade.

    The buffing wheel is 6" attached to a block of wood with a carriage bolt. This was done so it would be easy to chuck it up in the lathe.

    It is kind of like a super strop.

    Since the buffer is a wheel, it would seem it might be creating a micro hollow stropping at the edge of the bevel.

    Not a lot of testing or comparison was done. A few shavings were taken with the #4-1/2 revealing a problem with the plane that needs to be addressed.

    This would take some time testing and comparing to evaluate. It may be useful for some. For me not having a permanent set up for a buffer, it may be quicker to continue to hone and strop.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 08-06-2020 at 5:48 PM. Reason: wording
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,729
    I donít agree with the buffer on a simple straight. The shape is too important the last thing you want is what a buffer delivers. Just a leather strop with good compound is perfectly suitable.
    For carving chisels itís great you want a apple seed edge on one side. So you can scoop out wood.
    A buffer is a must have for a spoon knife one still has to be careful not to over do it because it very difficult shallow out the bevel. Thatís my story and Iím sticking to it.
    Aj

  12. #12
    The time savings is one of the advantages for this approach. They only use one medium grit stone, move to the buffer, and get edges that are super sharp and much more durable than sharpening flat.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,537
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    I don’t agree with the buffer on a simple straight. The shape is too important the last thing you want is what a buffer delivers. Just a leather strop with good compound is perfectly suitable.
    For carving chisels it’s great you want a apple seed edge on one side. So you can scoop out wood.
    A buffer is a must have for a spoon knife one still has to be careful not to over do it because it very difficult shallow out the bevel. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it.
    I used a Tormek leather buffing wheel for donkey years, and was never really been happy with the results on anything, especially curved blades, such as gouges. The wheel on the Tormek is hard, covered in leather with little give. The soft, stitched cloth buffing wheel is a different kettle of fish, and a game changer.

    I am still experimenting, and want to next try a hard felt wheel, but realise that the technique needs to be adjusted for this.


    Regards from Perth


    Derek

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    Posts
    1,062
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post

    I am still experimenting, and want to next try a hard felt wheel, but realise that the technique needs to be adjusted for this.
    I bought a hard felt (well it felt hard on the pocket at least) buffing wheel from Lee Valley. I'll be trying it this weekend.
    "If you have all your fingers, you can convert to Metric"

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,537
    Use a very light touch, Hilton. The hard felt will exert much more buffing force than the stitched wheel.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •