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Thread: Dust Collection - Hanging Pipe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Greensboro, NC
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    114

    Dust Collection - Hanging Pipe

    I'm installing a new system in a new shop. The shop has 10' ceilings and I am installing the DC pipe first and the lights around it, so I would like to have the DC run as close to the ceiling as possible, if not attached directly to the ceiling. I haven't been able to find very much info on how to do this. I see a lot of info on hanging the duct several inches down from the ceiling, but not a lot on getting it close to the ceiling.

    The main reason for this is I want it out of the way and I don't want it blocking ay lighting I have installed. Hopefully someone has done this and can help. Pictures would be so helpful.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    I would suggest 3/4 unistrut with the two part strap. Easy and secure.

    unistrut pipe hangers

  3. #3
    I used big hose clamps to secure my 5 inch duct, I got them from Amazon. I drilled a hole in them and screwed them to the wall which is OSB. On the ceiling, I did not have a floor joist where I wanted it so I screwed a piece of plywood (narrow like 2 inches wide) to two joists spanning where I wanted the duct and screwed the clamp to that. Works fine. I think the plywood I used is 5mm luan. It sags a little but hasn't failed to support the duct. 1/2 inch would be safer. (My ceiling is 5/8 drywall, there is a bedroom above my shop)

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Frederick View Post
    I would suggest 3/4 unistrut with the two part strap. Easy and secure.

    unistrut pipe hangers
    Second this idea. It's what I used to secure my vertical drops along walls. Or Sammy rod hangers and ordinary swivel pipe hangers. What are you fastening to - wood joists?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    I used 3/4" perforated metal hanging strap from the the local home center. Inexpensive and worked well.
    Dick Mahany.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    SoCal
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    I am faced with this same challenge in my new shop plans. Being a woodworker (we're a clever lot but, often too clever for our own good) I came up with several versions of a bracket that would screw to the ceiling joists and accept various retainers for the pipe. In the end I stopped, fell back, took a breath and did the math. A 10' section of ASTM-2729 (my 6" pipe of choice) weighs about 13 pounds (the figure used for shipping 100 feet divided by 10).

    This led me to a simple milled hardwood 1-1/2" square block 6" long. This block can be supported by a centered, counter-bored 1/4" or 5/16" fender washer / lag screw that goes 2-1/2" into the joist either directly or through drywall. This allows for pivoting in the direction required. Perforated hanging strap screwed in at each end of the block is well within spec for this weight, especially if two or more support points are used.

    Duct Hanger-1.JPG . Duct Hanger-2.JPG . Duct Hanger-3.JPG

    This is the method I will be going forward with unless something more complicated and time consuming worms its way into my head before I hang. My plan is to have the bottom of the pipe at ~ 8" below the ceiling. The lights will hang just below this to avoid shadows.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 08-01-2020 at 8:14 PM.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  7. #7
    Perforated metal strap is certainly economical but looks tacky IMHO if exposed. If that's not a concern nylon strap or steel cable might also be an option. But Glenn is correct in that metal ducts are not heavy and don't require the support as water filled pipe, etc. I used 3/8" rod to support my horizontal runs and had to laugh at myself during the installation because it was so overkill.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    4,497
    I did it hillbilly and used automotive serpentine belt with a screw at each end. I figure the rubber transmits less vibration then plumbers tape. Now I would use the plastic plumbers tape. It was a pain to get a screw driven through the rubber belting.
    Bill D

  9. I spent a lot of time researching ways and methods to hang dust pipe. The absolute best way (and most expensive) is to use actual pipe hangers in the size that matches your duct (see blastgate.com pipe hanger sections). Those pipe hangers can be mounted to the ceiling via 3/8 threaded rod and are available in single 3/8 rod or duel 3/8 rod hanging configurations. My dust collector uses a 12 trunk line and the corresponding pipe hangers in 12 were stupid expensive without factoring in the 3/8 threaded rod and beam brackets (my shop is a metal framed building which required brackets for the ceiling end of the threaded rod which added even more potential cost)

    I decided not to go that route as each 12 hanger plus threaded rod and beam brackets came out to over $50 per mounting location of my memory serves me correctly.

    I instead decided to use perforated metal strap. It works great, is easy to hang and if you take your time and do it neatly it looks good too. Maybe not as good as pipe hangers but not bad either.

    Another option is steel wire or steel rope as its called. This stuff is fairly cheap and easy to work with. You just need some thimbles (the U shaped brackets for steel rope) and the corresponding wire rope clamps both of which are cheap. It also helps to get the cutting shears made specifically to cut wire or steel rope. They can be had for $25 or so.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    New York, NY
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    If you’re going to hang your duct tight to the ceiling, I’d suggest using these steel strap hangars from Ductmate.
    Run a screw with a washer through the center hole into a joist or anchor above and loop stainless hose clamp through, joining it loosely once in position. The hose clamp should be a few inches larger than the OD of the pipe so it can be left slack while you assemble everything. Cinch the hose clamps together once assembled using a nut driver in a cordless drill.


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    I used heavy, heavy plastic wire ties from the electrical section of the 'borg...24" long ones. While I used pieces of wood to provide something to loop the ties around and hang the duct, those hanger things that Peter shows are a really nice idea. I used the same method on my wall drops with. some pieces of 2x2 with drilled holes to contain the straps.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Kelly View Post
    If youre going to hang your duct tight to the ceiling, Id suggest using these steel strap hangars from Ductmate.
    Run a screw with a washer through the center hole into a joist or anchor above and loop stainless hose clamp through, joining it loosely once in position. The hose clamp should be a few inches larger than the OD of the pipe so it can be left slack while you assemble everything. Cinch the hose clamps together once assembled using a nut driver in a cordless drill.

    Interesting hanger ... not expensive overall and I doubt you can get the duct any tighter to the ceiling than that.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
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    Elizabethtown, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    Interesting hanger ... not expensive overall and I doubt you can get the duct any tighter to the ceiling than that.
    Actually you can use a circle type duct hanger with bent tabs, drill a hole on center line opposite the tabs and screw/bolt that to the ceiling. Any sheetmetal shop should be able to make these for you.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Celina, TX
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    187

    Close and Cheap

    I just recently finished hanging 6" DC pipe in my shop. I have 12' ceilings, but also wanted to keep the pipe as close as possible to avoid shadows from my flush mounted lights and maximize vertical space. I ended up using some scrap cedar I had left over from the trim and found some relatively inexpensive 6" metal pipe strap hangers on Amazon (2 for $13) (see link below). I cut pieces of the 1x4 cedar 20" long and anchored it into the ceiling joists. I had to put an extra block under each end of the strap since they weren't quite big enough to go around the OD of the pipe. I ended up painting the blocks to match the ceiling and blend in better. I considered other options, but they were either quite a bit more expensive or didn't look as finished.

    https://www.amazon.com/6inch-Bracket-Stainless-Tension-Assortment/dp/B082NNHDZ7/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=6+inch+pipe+strap+han gers&qid=1596414379&sr=8-2
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Charlie Barnes; 08-02-2020 at 9:03 PM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    114
    Great tips everyone, thanks! I really like the clips posted by Peter with some heavy duty plastic zip ties. This sounds very quick, easy and cheap. I need cheap after putting the building up and buying the duct!

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