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Thread: V3000 heats up garage

  1. #1

    V3000 heats up garage

    Hello,

    i have the Oneida V3000 dust collector in a single car garage. After using it for a while, the garage gets really warm. I have 6Ē pvc pipe and use only a small amount of flex hose. I don't open the doors often since we have neighbours close by. Is this normal? Is there anything I should change? Iíve had the collector about 2.5 years.

    thanks for any insight,
    Elaine

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Bay Area, CA
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    It's rated at 13 amps at 230 volts. Even at 8 amps it's almost 1800 watts of heater, basically. The power has to be going somewhere.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,288
    Yeah, dust collectors generate heat. A V3000 has a 3 hp motor. It draws 13 A at 230 volts, which is about 2 kilowatts. Y'know the electric space heaters that plug in an ordinary outlet? They come in various sizes, but many put out 1000 watts of heat. So your V3000 is putting out as much heat as two of those.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Wes Grass View Post
    It's rated at 13 amps at 230 volts. Even at 8 amps it's almost 1800 watts of heater, basically. The power has to be going somewhere.
    ok that makes sense. Thanks for your reply.

  5. #5
    No wonder it gets so warm. Thanks for your reply. I wanted to make sure I didnít have anything wrong. Cheers

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    Entropy, the entire universe is going to hell.
    Bill D

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    San Francisco Bay Area
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    My CV max is 5HP and it’s using a little over 3k watts. I can really feel it in my 3 car garage.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
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    20,603
    Run your shop vac for a few minutes. Put your hand at the exhaust port. Back when we took care of houses I would use a shop vac exhaust stream to hurry along a defrosting freezer. Moving air makes friction, friction makes static and heat. After running my 2HP cyclone for quite awhile the motor is not noticeably 'hot' but, the moving air is nice and warm.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 07-31-2020 at 10:07 AM.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  9. #9
    Compressing air heats it up, which is what the blower does.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
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    2,156
    My V5000 will significantly heat up the shop after extended operation.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
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    1,980
    Dang. Math sounds right, guess Ive just never ran mine continuously long enough to feel the effect.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

  12. #12
    I notice it with my 3 hp Dust Gorilla, especially in the summer. If it is drawing full power, I think the math works out that it is roughly a 10,000 BTU heater, which my 7,000 BTU window AC can't keep up with. Fortunately, I generally don't run it more than about a hour at a time. In the winter, it just means the unit heater runs less.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Arlington, TX
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    299
    If you prefer to keep the DC running between "needing" it (to avoid start/stop cycles on the motor), consider closing all blast gates, such that it moves no air. It will draw less electrical power, which translates into less heat, and a lot less heat into the shop air. It may exhaust a blast of hot air when you open a gate to use, but overall, it will heat your shop less.

    -- Andy - Arlington TX

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    4,792
    ALL power gets converted into heat energy. It may first do some work like moving air but that movng air will eventuall come to as stop as friction slows it down. Friction dumps the energy into heat. Noise heats up what ever it touches, light heats up what it sees etc.
    Bil lD.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
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    65
    The calculations here are wrong, they are assuming 0% efficiency ( that means no work gets done, but we know the fans are moving air).
    The power that goes directly to heat is the amount left over after the work (sucking dust) is done.

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