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Thread: ID this wood?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    State College, PA
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    ID this wood?

    Any idea what this wood is? The finish has been removed.

    8FACB511-1509-421A-81B6-397268E88622.jpg

    Wiping with mineral spirits brings out a reddish tone.

    0D0DD3D9-77E3-4D14-892E-AC986E2DF2BC.jpg

    This is part of a dresser. I believe the dresser to be at least 70 years old, maybe 100.

  2. #2
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    It looks like Black Walnut.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Columbus, OH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    It looks like Black Walnut.
    Agreed. Likely air dried given the red tones are still there and the age you are providing.
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  4. #4
    Definitely walnut.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    NE Iowa
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    Almost certainly naturally dried black walnut.

  6. #6
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    Jul 2010
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    Thanks guys! I guess all the black walnut I’ve seen has been kiln dried and probably steamed too. The rich red tones threw me off the trail.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Aubuchon View Post
    Thanks guys! I guess all the black walnut I’ve seen has been kiln dried and probably steamed too. The rich red tones threw me off the trail.
    Steaming black walnut should be a crime. Actually, it is a crime against the aesthetics of wood, we just don't have a way of punishing the guilty.

    Beyond steaming, air dried black walnut is much nicer than kiln dried, if you're interested in color and character. The best color and character though, comes from walnut that has stewed in the log on the ground long enough for the sapwood to decay. Quite often, incredible definition of the grain, with subtle reds, greens and purples will appear.

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