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Thread: Frozen screw in Wheelchair.

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Tashiro View Post
    115 ft lbs is a tremendous torque for the light duty bolts I've seen on wheelchairs. (For example, lug nuts on some cars are only tightened to 90 ft lbs.) Make sure it's not 115 inch-lbs.
    That's it ! 115 inch Lbs Can a drill have that much torque ?

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clarence Martinn View Post
    I think the threads on the frame where the bolts go through, are too tight.
    It may be somehow the wrong bolts have been installed.

    Was this wheelchair purchased new?

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    It may be somehow the wrong bolts have been installed.

    Was this wheelchair purchased new?

    jtk
    Brand new about 2 years ago. Even the Dealer had a heck of a time adjusting the bolts on the brakes.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clarence Martinn View Post
    Brand new about 2 years ago. Even the Dealer had a heck of a time adjusting the bolts on the brakes.
    Clarence, do you have any way you can post images?

    If you have mentioned as to whether this is an occupant powered wheelchair or an electric wheelchair, it has slipped by me.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clarence Martinn View Post
    That's it ! 115 inch Lbs Can a drill have that much torque ?
    I don't know the torque specs for a typical 3/8 inch drill, but I doubt it can. To unstick a stuck bolt you'll probably need more toque than the spec for tightening it An impact driver is a different and better tool for the job than a drill. There's something about a series of impacts that works better than exerting a constant torque. An impact driver is very handy to have if you do projects involving screws and bolts.

  6. #21
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    115 in-lbs is not much torque. It's just shy of 10 ft-lbs, which is not much. If the screws are stuck, it's probably due to dirt or galling. The 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone is an excellent suggestion (an auto magazine did a test a number of years ago, and that mix came out on top over all the common commercial penetrants). Then use an impact driver if one is available--the high frequency of short impacts makes a world of difference in removing stuck fasteners. If you don't break them first...
    Jason

    "Don't get stuck on stupid." --Lt. Gen. Russel Honore


  7. #22
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    Using a impact wrench and something like liquid wrench works for me. I have a smaller impact tool that works on smaller bolts. It is not likely to break a bolt. I think the shocks of the impact wrench help the penetrating oil.

  8. #23
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    Most electric drills will not produce this kind of torque. If they did their makers would likely be liable for many a broken wrist.

    I had Dewalt drills that you could twist the chuck back and the hit the trigger and it was like a impact hammer. Loosened a lot of bolts with them

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerome Stanek View Post
    Most electric drills will not produce this kind of torque. If they did their makers would likely be liable for many a broken wrist.
    I had Dewalt drills that you could twist the chuck back and the hit the trigger and it was like a impact hammer. Loosened a lot of bolts with them
    The short bursts of an impact hammer are quite different than a drill bit running at full speed then all of a sudden catching and spinning the drill motor in a users hand.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  10. #25

    Brake on wheelchair

    Here is a picture showing that brand of wheelchair

  11. #26
    This is strange. I can post pictures, but the forum software will not let me view my own pictures that I just posted...

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clarence Martinn View Post
    This is strange. I can post pictures, but the forum software will not let me view my own pictures that I just posted...
    This is because you need to be a contributor to see posted images.

    This answers a lot of questions in my mind. If the brake is the leverage mechanism on the top blue tube resting against the wheel, then the bolt is likely torqued to 115 inch pounds.

    My guess is either the bolt was cross threaded or someone used a bolt with the wrong threads and forced it in during assembly. It could even be the original was supposed to be metric and someone used an SAE bolt.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #28
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    Good chance that bolt will snap when torqued enough to remove. You may have to drill it out. Check very carefully if it is metric or not so you get the correct wrench on the heads.
    Bil lD

  14. #29
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    If you are anywhere close to me, which I expect the chances are less than slim, I'll be glad to fix it for you.

  15. #30
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    Hi Clarence,
    I was going to say that the torque is in inch-pounds but everyone else beat me to it. Trying to get half that many foot-pounds would snap the bolt or crush the tubes.

    I can't see your picture either but if you have an Invacare getting the brakes set just right is a pain. My Mother has one and I've had to fiddle with it a couple times.

    One thing to check before you rip apart the brakes-if the tires are inflated make sure the pressure is correct. The first sign the tires on my Catalyst K-5 wheelchair are low is the brakes not holding. On my chair the tire pressure is 75 psi. If you have pneumatic tires DO NOT adjust the brakes if the tires are low. It won't end well.

    The solid rubber tires almost never need to have the brakes adjusted. Make sure the tires aren't shot, the wheels are mounted OK and the bearings OK before you make adjustments.

    I can't add anything about removing frozen bolts that hasn't already been said. My experience is that Parts Blaster works on rusted parts.

    -Tom

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