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Thread: To much weight?

  1. #1
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    To much weight?

    How much is to much weight on a stud. I am in the process of totally reorganizing my shop so the workflow is better and I have more room to move around. One of the things taking up way to much space in my shop is all of my bessy clamps. I decided to try out the woodpecker clamp it rack as it seemed to have a really high density compared to my old hooks that held a single clamp each. I mounted up 6 pair of mine tonight and was able to get 40 of the clamps on the hooks. 7 are the 12” ones but the rest are 24” - 50”. I used a piece of 3/4” BB ply and it’s screwed in to two studs, which also happen to be part of the sheer wall in the house. Do you see any concerns about that being to much weight hanging there or it’s fine. I still have 8 of the bessy 8ft++ clamps and another 20 of the 1ft ones to find homes for. I use the 1’ ones for making laminated blanks for peppermills and other turned items. I’ll install those on another wall to spread out the load. Thanks
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  2. #2
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    Not even close. One stud takes 10000 plus pounds of pressure to crush in a hydraulic press on end. I think you will be fine.

  3. #3
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    In such situations it's not just vertical load on the stud, it will create some horizontal pull force. It depends how many nails are holding the stud at the top but it will likely be Ok.

  4. #4
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    You should be fine.
    You have tied two vertical studs together with the BB. The clamps are essentially flush to the wall so there is very little angle of moment. You probably have 150lbs. of clamps on the wall. All of the weight is downward force load. People used to mount tube televisions to walls back in the day, and those stuck out quite a bit from a wall.
    Wood storage racks on studded walls are more of a problem. The weight is considerable, there are generally multiple"shelves", and the actual weight itself is distributed from the wall, to the widest boards. No you have angular moment which can cause the stud(s) to bow along their length, and possibly crack.
    A Civil, or Mechanical engineer could tell you exactly what your load is, but they would need to know weights, distribution, distances from the wall, etc. I think you're fine though.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  5. #5
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    If you've hung 150lbs of clamps an average of 8" from the plane of the wall, say 6' above the floor, the horizontal force on the two studs you've attached to is less than 20lbs static load. Not going to be a problem.

  6. #6
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    I asked a similar question several years ago, and got similar responses. My take away was to focus much more on the quality of screws to fasten cabinets, etc to the studs.

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....hang-on-a-wall
    Brian

    "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger or more complicated...it takes a touch of genius and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction." - E.F. Schumacher

  7. #7
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    Hopefully you used some good screws for mounting the brackets and the plywood.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  8. #8
    As others have said, the weight is no problem. But mostly I just wanted to express clamp envy
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  9. #9
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    I don't think you are even close to the weight I'm hanging with 5 rows of shelves fully loaded with books on a standard sheet-rocked wall.

    I do believe that sheet rock or even a thin plywood skin contributes mightily in distributing the load.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Cannon View Post
    I don't think you are even close to the weight I'm hanging with 5 rows of shelves fully loaded with books on a standard sheet-rocked wall.

    I do believe that sheet rock or even a thin plywood skin contributes mightily in distributing the load.
    Most of the structural strength of a wall is the sheeting.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  11. #11
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    What's a sheer wall? You can park a pickup on a 2x4, clamps are nothing.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Tymchak View Post
    I asked a similar question several years ago, and got similar responses. My take away was to focus much more on the quality of screws to fasten cabinets, etc to the studs.

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....hang-on-a-wall
    Thanks everyone for the replies. I have been busy with work this week and forgot about this thread. I used the lag screws that came with the brackets to hold the brackets to the BB. As for the BB to the studs I have standardized on all GRK fasteners in the shop for the most part (got tired of broken cheap/crappy fasteners from the Borg) so I used 3 of their 3-1/2” R4 screws in each in each of the two studs. They seems to be quality screws and I felt they were strong enough but if you guys think otherwise I can go put some lag screws in as well. Thanks again!

  13. #13
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    GRK screws are way stronger than standard lag bolt type fasteners. They are made for structural uses in construction.

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