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Thread: Shipping equipment

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baltimore
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    15

    Shipping equipment

    Looking for a reputable shipper that will pick up equipment and ship across the country. Has any one worked with a company they would recommend? What was the experience like? Rough costs? thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    4,470
    how big? if it will fit in a gaylord fedex has flat rate shipping crates. I think they will pick up and deliver to a home address. The price includes the pallet and the gaylord. I think 1,200 pounds weight limit and the box is about a four foot cube.
    Bill D

    http://fedex.postclickmarketing.com/...eightboxupdate

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    5,869
    How many pieces of equipment, how heavy, etc will change these replies you get. One piece of equipment is different than a whole shop.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    1,754
    Rough cost? How about rough idea on machinery? I don't know anyone that will pick up without crating or bolting to a pallet. I've only had bad experiences over the last few years. Got jabbed for using wrong freight class once. Another jab when I underestimated the weight of the skids a millwright company made to ship a huge industrial lathe. I also got a shipment on a eTrike that the driver didn't even want to move to the back of the truck because the box of crushed and half way off the skid.

  5. #5
    For a one time thing, it will be more than if you move numerous things a month. My costs are very reasonable.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baltimore
    Posts
    15
    One machine is a slider at about 800lbs. and the other machine is a Jointer at about 1000 lbs.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    802
    I've often looked at shipping equipment as I've seen some things in auctions that I would like. But finding someone who can package a machine correctly and ship it has always been one of the biggest reasons i haven't. I've never even got to the cost part of it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Flower mound, Tx
    Posts
    514
    I have used Old Dominion in the past and had very good service through each phase of the process. I thought they were pretty reasonable. The tricky part is always the crating, pickup and delivery. There are plenty of threads on this forum about delivery fails. The bigger/heavier the machine, the bigger the cost/logistics.
    I don’t own a forklift but have rented them three times and they’re expensive.
    I would NOT recommend FedEx.
    Good luck

  9. #9
    The only things I have had destroyed were in crates. A skid bigger than machine, banding and a good wrap job seem to get handled better.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    53,236
    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    The only things I have had destroyed were in crates. A skid bigger than machine, banding and a good wrap job seem to get handled better.
    I can see this....a big skid/pallet that exceeds the dimensions of the tooling with the machine very thoroughly tied down to the skid/pallet and then wrapped as you indicate. Of course, my CNC came in a full crate that just barely fit in the commercial trailer...





    OP, while I kinda agree with Darcy, it's important that you meet the carrier's requirements. If they will accept a pallet and wrap and still insure it in full, that's a lot leas work to package things up. If they require a full crate...then that's what you need to do. Size also matters. Pallet and wrap is going to work better for "big stuff" and full crate is likely going to be better for smaller gear...but should still be very clearly marked all over "do not stack". Wink, wink...nod, nod...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I can see this....a big skid/pallet that exceeds the dimensions of the tooling with the machine very thoroughly tied down to the skid/pallet and then wrapped as you indicate. Of course, my CNC came in a full crate that just barely fit in the commercial trailer...





    OP, while I kinda agree with Darcy, it's important that you meet the carrier's requirements. If they will accept a pallet and wrap and still insure it in full, that's a lot leas work to package things up. If they require a full crate...then that's what you need to do. Size also matters. Pallet and wrap is going to work better for "big stuff" and full crate is likely going to be better for smaller gear...but should still be very clearly marked all over "do not stack". Wink, wink...nod, nod...
    I have learned way more about logistics, LTL and freight then I every thought I would need.

    It's a funny game.

    I think the dock jockeys think they can rough house a crate more than a skid with product/material/equipment secured on it.

    Also, you really wouldn't believe how nice things ride just packed into the back of a semi.

  12. #12
    The very best deal I have ever come across is from Fastenal's third party shipping, who will ship very inexpensively between their stores. You must drop off and pickup at their store. If a heavy machine that requires a forklift, check that the particular stores you plan to use actually have a forklift. Shipped a pallet-ized 8" PM jointer from coast to coast for ~$200.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    The only things I have had destroyed were in crates. A skid bigger than machine, banding and a good wrap job seem to get handled better.
    This has been my experience as well. If the warehouse guys can "see" it, they tend to be more a careful where if it's just a cardboard or OSB crate, they'll harpoon it/back into it all day long with a forklift. At least in my experience. These days, we ship machines heavily shrink-wrapped but on open-framed skids with tip-n-tells and those little caution pyramids on top. If you do all this, really minimizes the risk. Good luck with it.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,283
    Skid design and the subsequent handling is scary.

    The skid will flex, especially when picked up by one corner.

    Forks that are too short or not inserted all the way in will definitely be applied, and tilted way back.

    The pallet will be pushed around by the fork tips.

    Tight fork pockets are way frustrating for operators. You don't want that.

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