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Thread: 3rd Stall 13-15' x 52' setup

  1. #1
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    3rd Stall 13-15' x 52' setup

    Our 24x26 garage currently has my 15' tracksaw table, miter stand, 2 festool cross cut tables, family stuff, kids stuff. Our minivan and truck get parked outside, ALL YEAR LONG. We live in Wisconsin, so snowblowing with 2 cars in the driveway is a pain. Not having a tablesaw is a pain. When i heard from a buddy that my 13-15' x 52' 3rd stall addition on my garage would only cost $20-25,000, i jumped at it. The builder can't do it until spring, so i'm planning things.

    I've got a pretty detailed plan that i've tried to post a few times to this thread. This forum seems to handle photos differently than i'm used to. The photo is either HUGE, or teeny tiny. Can somebody help me? is there a certain size I should be using? I either attach the picture, or paste it, and then it says the text i've entered is too long like it converted my photo to text.

    EDIT: I guess its attached as a thumbnail.........
    10 outlets in ceiling for LED shop lights on 4 way switch, fully insulated with 2" insulated garage doors. No windows, but 2 large skylights for natural light.

    ~So the green thing is a mobile parts washer, got my truck,
    ~the red thing is a possible 2 post Rotary car lift. Not sure if I'm installing that or not.
    ~The small blue things are 2 air purifiers, i've got a smaller WEN brand one, was going to get another large WEN.
    ~Large Blue thing is a sealed combusion HotDawg heater. Not sure if I should do 75,100, 125k BTU....
    ~Compressor in the corner.
    ~Oneida V3000 dust collector in another. Having a small utility sink installed next to the Rado pipe.

    ~Gray thing is the new location of surface mounted subpanel so I can easily add more circuits.
    ~Salmon colored box is my toolbox, blue thing will be a 28k BTU window air conditioner framed into the wall like some apartments do.
    ~Long gray thing with purple boxes will be some kind of mitersaw station with some other bench tools like an oscilating belt sander, maybe my drill press.
    ~Larger purple box is a future jointer that I can move around.

    ~Big yellow-ish box is the space needed for some kind of sliding table saw. it of course won't be that big, but need that space for sliding and the material. I can slide the wagon forward if I'm working on the car lift.

    ~Other purple boxes are for stuff like mobile planer, maybe a band saw, router table.

    i NEED:
    Some kind of assembly table for sure, that'll be on wheels. Shelving, cabinets, some kind of material rack probably to the left of the tool box.

    Other than not doing the car lift (which i might not do anyway) and parking my truck outside for more shop space. What do you guys think?

    3rd stall.jpg
    Last edited by Jon Steffen; 07-03-2020 at 10:58 PM.

  2. #2
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    or should i do this with all the mobile stuff on the other side?
    3rd stall 2.jpg


    My original idea was that any lumber or panels I bring in will come from the left and can be easily loaded onto the saw.

    or this with the saw flipped around? Then i would have to carry panels through the whole shop to the saw and cut from right to left.... thoughts?

    3rd stall 3.jpg

  3. #3
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    I think this is a "to scale" of what the saw would look like, just saw, with no panel on it.
    shop best option.jpg
    Last edited by Jon Steffen; 07-04-2020 at 12:14 AM.

  4. #4
    After I bought my current house I knew I needed a dedicated shop so I had a 14x24 extra garage added. It is small but works for me. I have a garage door at one end and a passage door at the other. One long wall has two windows - my ex insisted - so it has wood storage and a few other things. It will soon get bandsaw along that wall and it is where the 5 inch trunk line for my DC runs. The other long wall has a long bench with my CMS and RAS on it with flip stops that work for both. Drawers for storage go below. The box with the drawers is 30 inches high (PT kick space included) so the tools are shimmed up to my preferred 38 inch table height. In the center, I have my 36 inch PCS and a 3x7 foot outfeed/work table/track saw cutting station. 3x7 supports full sheets well and I can back my pickup up to the garage door and slide sheets onto the table for cutting. It's size lets me have an aisle on both sides. The top has 20mm holes on 4 inch centers made using pegboard and a woodrave router base. I put long dogs on my shortest tracksaw track for accurate crosscuts to about 31 inches wide stock. No need for a MFT. No space for one either.

  5. #5
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    How high will your ceilings be? If you have 10'-13' feet, why not do a 4 post car lift.

    I did this is a couple of garages, a few houses ago. I actually never intended to use it for lifting a vehicle, but actually did it for storage of motorcycles, lawn mowers, etc., that basically created another bay.

    I bought a 9000lb rated BendPak that could rise to 6' 8" clearance. This allowed me to park my Suburban beneath when it was raised. It was a 110v electric and would rise in about a minute and come down in about 20 seconds.

    Here's a video os still images of a couple of these garages.


    This is link to a slideshow of better pictures
    https://www.mad-ducati.com/SlideShow...kUEbnOiFh2Uv03
    Last edited by ChrisA Edwards; 07-04-2020 at 7:04 PM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisA Edwards View Post
    How high will your ceilings be? If you have 10'-13' feet, why not do a 4 post car lift.

    I did this is a couple of garages, a few houses ago. I actually never intended to use it for lifting a vehicle, but actually did it for storage of motorcycles, lawn mowers, etc., that basically created another bay.

    I bought a 9000lb rated BendPak that could rise to 6' 8" clearance. This allowed me to park my Suburban beneath when it was raised. It was a 110v electric and would rise in about a minute and come down in about 20 seconds.

    Here's a video os still images of a couple of these garages.


    This is link to a slideshow of better pictures
    https://www.mad-ducati.com/SlideShow...kUEbnOiFh2Uv03
    I'm doing 12' ceilings. The lift was going to be so i could work on my Jeep. If I need more space i'll consider the 4 post, but for now I was wondering what people thought of the woodshop setup.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisA Edwards View Post
    How high will your ceilings be? If you have 10'-13' feet, why not do a 4 post car lift.

    I did this is a couple of garages, a few houses ago. I actually never intended to use it for lifting a vehicle, but actually did it for storage of motorcycles, lawn mowers, etc., that basically created another bay.

    I bought a 9000lb rated BendPak that could rise to 6' 8" clearance. This allowed me to park my Suburban beneath when it was raised. It was a 110v electric and would rise in about a minute and come down in about 20 seconds.

    Here's a video os still images of a couple of these garages.


    This is link to a slideshow of better pictures
    https://www.mad-ducati.com/SlideShow...kUEbnOiFh2Uv03
    Holy crap I just watched that video. you sir know how pack a garage. you put that lift to full use. I love the elevator to more storage. you've got more guts than me, i'd be afraid i'd drop a bike off there. I could see doing that for dirt bikes and scooters, but those are full size motorcycles! lol, nice.

    Thinking more and more about this, I never thought of adding an additional 100-200SF of "upper storage" to my shop before......And with 7500-9000-14000 lbs of lift, you could store quite the stuff on that. Huge pile of lumber you're working with, lawn mower, long term once a year storage stuff....Maybe your suggestion wasn't as crazy as I first thought it was. How did you build your platform on the lift? 2x4s and plywood with a few anchors through the steel tread plates?
    Last edited by Jon Steffen; 07-05-2020 at 1:02 AM.

  8. #8
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    The platform was two layers of 3/4" 4' x 8' sheets of plywood giving me a 8' x 16' x 1.5" platform. I made two 8' x 8' sections, four sheets screwed together, and just laid them on the metal ramps.

    The lift was 16' long and the metal ramps were 6' wide, I had to notch the corners of the plywood for the 4 posts, but the plywood gave me that extra 2' of width and an extra 32sq/ft, which suited the wheelbase better for storing my motorcycles.

    It really was like adding an extra bay to the garage for about $2800.

    I had the garage door rails and opener moved, so rather than hanging down 5 feet from the ceiling, the door ran straight up the wall and as close to the ceiling as possible. This gave me maximum height above the lift.

    The guy down the street collected DeLorean's. He have three lifts, one in each bay of his garage, and had 6 DeLoreans.
    Last edited by ChrisA Edwards; 07-05-2020 at 9:12 AM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisA Edwards View Post
    The platform was two layers of 3/4" 4' x 8' sheets of plywood giving me a 8' x 16' x 1.5" platform. I made two 8' x 8' sections, four sheets screwed together, and just laid them on the metal ramps.

    The lift was 16' long and the metal ramps were 6' wide, I had to notch the corners of the plywood for the 4 posts, but the plywood gave me that extra 2' of width and an extra 32sq/ft, which suited the wheelbase better for storing my motorcycles.

    It really was like adding an extra bay to the garage for about $2800.

    I had the garage door rails and opener moved, so rather than hanging down 5 feet from the ceiling, the door ran straight up the wall and as close to the ceiling as possible. This gave me maximum height above the lift.

    The guy down the street collected DeLorean's. He have three lifts, one in each bay of his garage, and had 6 DeLoreans.
    Lol, that's a lot of DeLoreans!

    I'm getting jackshaft door openers installed, and the front door will be 11' tall, so that'll already hug the ceiling a lot.

    My last garage had roof pitch garage tracks to hug the ceiling as much as possible. Very neat.

    I don't think this will be a mod I'm going to do immediately, but I'll plan the layout with this in mind.
    Great spot for my dethatcher, aerator, snowblower, mower deck storage so I don't keep tripping over them in my storage "shed", 18x20 carport in the backyard.

  10. #10
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    does anybody else have any comments/feedback about the wood shop layouts I posted?

  11. #11
    Jon,

    I spent some time on your diagrams and am still not confident I fully understand them. Putting the table saw in the center and other tools around the edges with mobile bases so they can come out when needed is a sound idea I and many others use, I believe.

    I am not in the slider camp, however. I know many people here love theirs and I might too if I ever get one but that is very unlikely. Especially for my small shop I just don't think it would work well. I would have to spend considerable time thinking about handling of sheet goods before going that way. I do not see how that would be easy to do in your layout either. I use a smaller table saw + track saw because it allows me to slide sheet goods out of my pickup onto my cut table and only have to move the smaller cut pieces around the shop. I am not saying there isn't a way to do it for your slider based shop, just that I do not see it. Once you have the sheet on the slider, I think it could work very well to cut it up. My concern is getting it there. I can lift full sheets of 3/4 plywood and MDF but I do not want to if I can avoid it.

    So I think your idea of table saw in the center and other tools around the edges is good. Maybe you do not need my cross cut bench along a wall with the slider. But for me it works well. But I encourage you to think through movement of sheet goods if you think you will need to do that often.

    Jim

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    Jon,

    I spent some time on your diagrams and am still not confident I fully understand them.
    Sorry about that. The last diagram probably makes the most sense. The first 3 where as if a sheet of plywood were on the sliding table. If you imagine a 8 foot sheet of plywood that passes through a tablesaw blade, it has to be at least 16 feet of space. The slider is a bit longer than 8 feet, so you actually need 20 feet depth, in my case this is from left to right in the diagrams. Also if you have a 50" table to the right of the blade, and have a full 4x8 sheet to cross cut on the left, you need at least 12+ feet of space in this orientation.

    If you look at my last drawing, below. I would back my truck into the garage, offload a sheet onto the sliding tablesaw that's roughly in the middle of the garage. then have tools around the walls that can hopefully be wheeled out.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
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    Jon, with that narrow space, you'll likely be happier with using the slider outrigger if you opt for a narrower "rip capacity" on the right side...IE a shorter rip fence setup. I had to cut mine down by 16" for that reason. For your mobile tools, you may also find it more efficient to have more of a "corral" setup rather than stacking them along the walls, probably toward the right side of the drawing. That leaves more space for operating your slider as well as for assembling and finishing things.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Jon, with that narrow space, you'll likely be happier with using the slider outrigger if you opt for a narrower "rip capacity" on the right side...IE a shorter rip fence setup. I had to cut mine down by 16" for that reason. For your mobile tools, you may also find it more efficient to have more of a "corral" setup rather than stacking them along the walls, probably toward the right side of the drawing. That leaves more space for operating your slider as well as for assembling and finishing things.
    Good food for thought. It would be impossible to cross cut anything more than 9 feet to the left of the saw blade if I had a 50" setup to the right of blade. SIGHHHH

    I don't understand the corral concept.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Steffen View Post
    Good food for thought. It would be impossible to cross cut anything more than 9 feet to the left of the saw blade if I had a 50" setup to the right of blade. SIGHHHH
    Occasionally, the reduced width to the right bites me for a cross cut on a long piece of material since I removed my miter saw upstairs to the lumber storage area...but that's driven by a stairway in the way, anyway. So I just do it a different way. 99% of the time, it's a non-issue. We have to work within the space we have and being able to walk by the outrigger is more important to me than losing a little capacity to the right side since most workpiece extension is to the left of the blade with a slider.

    I don't understand the corral concept.
    That's where you park all the mobile tools not in use in "one corner of the shop" rather than lining the walls. The idea is to maximise open space for more flexibility.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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