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Thread: 3rd Stall 13-15' x 52' setup

  1. #16
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    Okay, I get the corral concept now. I think I'll plan out the space and then have to work in it for a while then make any adjustments. I need to read and watch more about assembly tables to get some ideas.

  2. #17
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    Over time, you'll also begin to see a pattern on what you use the most, so those will tend to be parked "more convenient" than tools that are more rarely used which tend to end up tucked more out of the way in the "corral".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
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    Jon ,on the slider cutting full sheets of plywood. You either rip whole sheet full length into pieces and then continue to break down crosscutting those pieces or crosscut sheet first. Usually if you have the slide length to rip 8 feet you start with that. When I owned my first slider, Minimax SC2 it only had a 50'' throw so I started sheet breakdown with a crosscut. With sheet goods it would be very rare to need 8' space to the left of blade,maybe with solid lumber that starts longer than 8'. I use my rip capacity on my slider way more than I did on my Unisaw (50"). Both as a rip fence in the traditional sense and as bump fence for crosscutting to length all the time. I use my saw about 50/50 for sheet goods and solid stock.I like your slider placement in the drawing. Give thought to sheet good storage and loading of the saw. Place jointer/planer/bandsaw near your hardwood storage. Everything else can be fit in where they fit or made moveable. I also have a small "corral". good luck.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kees View Post
    Jon ,on the slider cutting full sheets of plywood. You either rip whole sheet full length into pieces and then continue to break down crosscutting those pieces or crosscut sheet first. Usually if you have the slide length to rip 8 feet you start with that. When I owned my first slider, Minimax SC2 it only had a 50'' throw so I started sheet breakdown with a crosscut. With sheet goods it would be very rare to need 8' space to the left of blade,maybe with solid lumber that starts longer than 8'. I use my rip capacity on my slider way more than I did on my Unisaw (50"). Both as a rip fence in the traditional sense and as bump fence for crosscutting to length all the time. I use my saw about 50/50 for sheet goods and solid stock.I like your slider placement in the drawing. Give thought to sheet good storage and loading of the saw. Place jointer/planer/bandsaw near your hardwood storage. Everything else can be fit in where they fit or made moveable. I also have a small "corral". good luck.
    Nice. I watched a video with Sam Blasco and he said something like, "nice thing with sliders, you cut and just keep turning the panel left." I like that idea.

    Are you supposed to store sheet goods flat or stood up?

    I'm thinking of multi level wood rack for solid boards, but not sure on the panels.

  5. #20
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    Ideally, sheet goods are stored on edge but in such a way that they cannot bend. Flat storage requires a huge amount of space and a high quality rack. Folks with high ceilings can put the short side down. The rest of us have to put the long edges down.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Ideally, sheet goods are stored on edge but in such a way that they cannot bend. Flat storage requires a huge amount of space and a high quality rack. Folks with high ceilings can put the short side down. The rest of us have to put the long edges down.
    So ideally, set on short edge totally flat against wall and devise something to stop it from pulling away from wall?

  7. #22
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    You can build a formal structure that provides proper support so that the sheets can "lean" for gravity to keep them in place, but no bend because they are fully supportive. A few degrees is all that is necessary. I did that for my horizontal rack and I think someone posted a similar arrangement not long ago for a vertical rack. This principle applies for folks who store lumber vertical, too. You don't just lean it against the wall and hope it doesn't bend...you create a support structure that takes care of keeping the boards "flat" while they are leaning slightly to keep them in place.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    You can build a formal structure that provides proper support so that the sheets can "lean" for gravity to keep them in place, but no bend because they are fully supportive. A few degrees is all that is necessary. I did that for my horizontal rack and I think someone posted a similar arrangement not long ago for a vertical rack. This principle applies for folks who store lumber vertical, too. You don't just lean it against the wall and hope it doesn't bend...you create a support structure that takes care of keeping the boards "flat" while they are leaning slightly to keep them in place.
    https://www.familyhandyman.com/artic...ywood-spacers/

    What's your take on this article that says you should have air between the sheets? Seems it would be hard to have air and support the boards at the same time.

    Anybody hear of a 4.5'x8' assembly table that has sheet good storage below it to lay them totally flat? Wouldn't be very convenient to get at the sheet on the bottom, but if you already want a big assembly table, it could double as storage for these awkward panels.

  9. #24
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    I did this, might give you some ideas


  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisA Edwards View Post
    I did this, might give you some ideas


    I need a Ducati sign! I like that mobile cart too. I doubt I'll have a ton of panels to store, but I like how you've got a little of everything storage there. Looks pretty stable AND mobile!

  11. #26
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    Jon I have sheet goods stored in a rack a lot like Chris except my rack is 4'x4' on the floor and vertical located right in a corner in my shop right next to a 10'x10' OH door. My solid lumber racks are vertical with dividers about 12'' apart and the slight back slope that Jim Becker mentioned above. The solid wood racks are located right on the other side of my door. Right in front of this storage sit my jointer and planer. I planned my storage for material and the TS location in the middle of my shop floor as well as the jointer and planer locations. These two have conduits run under my concrete coming up out of the floor and electrical plugs installed in metal RV pedestals bolted to the floor with drill in anchor bolts. After this the rest of my machines were placed where I thought they would work,some (most ) have moved .

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Steffen View Post

    What's your take on this article that says you should have air between the sheets? Seems it would be hard to have air and support the boards at the same time.
    "Theoretically", airflow between sheets and between boards for solid stock would be ideal...but it's impractical for dried material, IMHO. I do sticker dry solid stock when it first comes into my shop from time to time. Sheet goods? Not going to happen.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  13. #28
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    I'm not sure what happened to my post, but.... Thanks for all the replies, I've got lots to think about on my 3 hour drive home tomorrow.

    I had asked about torsion boxes, but I think the answer lies in this thread.
    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....on-box-madness

  14. #29
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    You deleted your most previous recent post prior the new one, Jon.

    Torsion boxes are great for assembly including clamping if they are setup well for the need.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    You deleted your most previous recent post prior the new one, Jon.

    Torsion boxes are great for assembly including clamping if they are setup well for the need.
    I tried editing it, must have hit the delete button instead. Wasn't sure if my phone just freaked out cuz I have spotty reception.

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