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Thread: Wooden beater for a froe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
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    N CA
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    414

    Wooden beater for a froe

    I have some logs I've cut to a rough length and needed a froe to get them to rough size. I just rec'd the LN froe. I had an old knot that was intended to to be carved up to make my hammer, but when I went looking for it, well in a cleaning frenzy this winter it didn't make the cut but did make it to the fire. So, back to square one, prompting the question, what do you like in a Froe hammer?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    It's going to get beaten to a mush, so don't buy one for that job. Usually, just a Hickory limb with the handle whittled down with a hatchet, after sawing around the base of the head.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Longview WA
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    Do you have a lathe? Here is one turned out of alder firewood:

    Big Whacker.jpg

    It was a bit heavy so some more was removed above the handle.

    Without a lathe a piece of split firewood and tree limbs have had handles cut in to them with various tools:

    Froe Whackers.jpg

    This shows how much the "Big Whacker" was cut down.

    It also shows my mini froe and mini whacker.

    The one on the left was a piece of split firewood that had good balance. The one on the left is a piece of bog or bitter cherry.

    The mush ring can be seen on all of them where they contact the froe.

    jtk
    Last edited by Jim Koepke; 07-02-2020 at 2:23 PM. Reason: The broken ring - changed broken to mush, thank Tom
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
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    Merriam, KS
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    I have one out of Osage Orange. Heavy and pretty indestructible. It is a booger to shape, though.

  5. #5
    Froe mauls are a disposable item depending on your amount of use. Grab a nice size piece of hardwood firewood and shape it on a lathe if you have one. If not, use a draw knife or hatchet.

    Left click my name for homepage link.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    South Coastal Massachusetts
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    I used a Louisville slugger remnant that was broken at a local softball tournament.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Belden, Mississippi
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    I have one I made from a dogwood root ball. Pretty darned tough.
    On the other hand, I still have five fingers.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill White View Post
    I have one I made from a dogwood root ball. Pretty darned tough.
    I made mine from a chunk of dogwood, turned on the lathe.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    51
    we always use dogwood with froes, and also made wooden wedges out of dogwood when we were making split rail fence. Start with Iron wedges, then use the wooden ones down the crack.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Belden, Mississippi
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    Yep! Dogwood wedges here too.
    On the other hand, I still have five fingers.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Mountain City, TN
    Posts
    519
    I am using a hunk of locust I turned on my lathe. Before that, I used hard maple.

  12. #12
    I usually make two sides flat, to produce a 90 degrees angle, as to make it easier to hit the tip of the froe on big logs.
    Mine is quite small, being a barrel maker froe. The lie Nielsen or gransfors are longer iirc, geared towards shingles making.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    springfield,or
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    259
    Deadblow or rubber mallet? I have a old big rubber mallet, that I may have borrowed from my dad about 8 years ago, that I literally use for whacking almost anything. I bring it camping to hit the top of my hatchet. Assembly of stuff, hitting my chisels, setting my wood planes, and dang near about any other non metal hammer task. The mallet was half chewed up when I got it and just won't die. It's not technically a deadblow. But it has almost no perceivable bounce back.

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