Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Cat Litter to dry Rough Turned Pieces

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, TX
    Posts
    2,493

    Cat Litter to dry Rough Turned Pieces

    A friend says he is now using unscented cheap cat litter to dry his green turned pieces. I says to use a garbage bag and place some litter under the piece and inside the piece and seal bag. The moisture will be down to about 10% in a month. Any experience out there and advice. I need to dry a couple of pieces too big for microwave and don't have year plus for drying.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kapolei Hawaii
    Posts
    3,040
    Unsure of cat litter... Could run into some dollars.
    What is your tine frame? Google Cindy Drozda fridge kiln. It's a real cheap way of drying stuff. I run 3 series of increasing wattage bulbs, as she says to do. In 3 or 4 weeks, I get pretty much dry wood. 1 week per wattage rating seems to do the trick. I run 40/60/75..... That is what the local hardware store had. I'm sure you could use others. I can give you some pointers if you want.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Northwest Indiana
    Posts
    592
    "Cat Litter" might get expensive, but oil-dry is a more generic form. Most auto stores should have 30-40 pound bags at $10-$15. Haven't bought any in a while, but a quick search showed a local location with 33 pounds for $10 +/-. Certainly is a thought, and could be used many times.
    earl

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, TX
    Posts
    2,493
    Quote Originally Posted by Earl McLain View Post
    "Cat Litter" might get expensive, but oil-dry is a more generic form. Most auto stores should have 30-40 pound bags at $10-$15. Haven't bought any in a while, but a quick search showed a local location with 33 pounds for $10 +/-. Certainly is a thought, and could be used many times.
    earl
    Found 25# for under $5 at local grocery store, and was told it can be reused. Guess set out in sunlight in open pan to drive out moisture would bring back some absorbency. I do use the cat litter for oil spots anyway so not a lost investment.

    Earlier reply about refrig dryer would work except for space required. I use a smaller "dryer" box to help cure oil finish on pieces to both raise temp slightly and reduce humidity, and box is located in attic where shop space is not critical.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Strongsville OH
    Posts
    89

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    9,705
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Canfield View Post
    A friend says he is now using unscented cheap cat litter to dry his green turned pieces. I says to use a garbage bag and place some litter under the piece and inside the piece and seal bag. The moisture will be down to about 10% in a month. Any experience out there and advice. I need to dry a couple of pieces too big for microwave and don't have year plus for drying.
    Much cat litter is made from clay. It's excellent for soaking up liquids but does it work as a desiccant and absorb water vapor? A test with a hygrometer might be interesting. There has been some discussion here of using desiccant for drying wood.

    Desiccant is dried for reuse in an oven so I assume cat litter made from clay could be dried the same way.

    Sorry, I have no personal experience with either cat litter or desiccant for drdying rough turned pieces. Those I have done used the were not under a time crunch so I used the anchorseal and air drying on the shelf method. I do have a lot of experience drying desiccant - I either use indicator desiccant or the non-indicator type with a little indicator desiccant mixed in.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    College Station, Texas
    Posts
    200
    I use Purina Tidy Cats Non-clumping Cat Litter. You can get 30# at Walmart for about $7.00. I like non-clumping because it will not bind much to the wet bowl blank like clumping litter. Have never tried to regenerate it, not worth the effort.

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Purina-Ti...SABEgJnZ_D_BwE
    Way south of most everybody...

  8. #8
    Gentlemen, After reading these interesting ideas on drying wet bowls with cat litter and etc., which got me to thinking. Are there or can there be others ways to speed the process of drying bowls? Could it or would it be possible to use Damp Rid moisture bags for this process? I use them in our closets to draw any moisture that might occur around clothing. I envision putting a bowl along with the Damp Rid in a lidded five gallon bucket and let it set for a few days and see what the results might be. I would assume but not sure that Damp Rid is a desiccant ? What are your thoughts ?
    Last edited by Harold Walsh; 07-02-2020 at 9:58 PM. Reason: misspelled word.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, TX
    Posts
    2,493
    Well I put a 18"x10"NE & 16" x9" NE bowl/tray and 11"D x5H and 8"Dx5"H thick bowls stacked with cat litter below and layed in the long and inside the smaller in a trash bag. The weight of each piece was marked and dated with combined weight of about 25# and 15# of cat litter used. I plan to check in a few weeks and see how weight change is progressing. Not all surfaces are in contact with the litter so will try to see how that works as opposed to complete immersing which would have required a lot more litter.

    The Damp Rid is an interesting though since it works with air moisture probably better than the litter. Then one would likely need to elevate the piece on a rack or spacers to allow air around the piece in a bag. Anyone want to try?






    3

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Canfield View Post
    Well I put a 18"x10"NE & 16" x9" NE bowl/tray and 11"D x5H and 8"Dx5"H thick bowls stacked with cat litter below and layed in the long and inside the smaller in a trash bag. The weight of each piece was marked and dated with combined weight of about 25# and 15# of cat litter used. I plan to check in a few weeks and see how weight change is progressing. Not all surfaces are in contact with the litter so will try to see how that works as opposed to complete immersing which would have required a lot more litter.

    The Damp Rid is an interesting though since it works with air moisture probably better than the litter. Then one would likely need to elevate the piece on a rack or spacers to allow air around the piece in a bag. Anyone want to try?






    3
    You might not see any weight loss of the entire bag with everything sealed in it. You would probably just get a transfer of moisture if it works from the wood to the litter. The damp rid is mostly calcium chloride with a tiny bit of sodium and potassium chloride.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, TX
    Posts
    2,493
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris A Lawrence View Post
    You might not see any weight loss of the entire bag with everything sealed in it. You would probably just get a transfer of moisture if it works from the wood to the litter. The damp rid is mostly calcium chloride with a tiny bit of sodium and potassium chloride.
    I put individual weights on pieces and that is what I will be comparing. I realize that the weight of the sealed bag will not change even though the litter is absorbing moisture from the wood. I am thinking that some fresh litter might be needed as the wood moisture goes down. I will also try weighing the "wet" litter when removed to see if I can lower its weight by drying the litter in hot sun on pan.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    801
    You might want to try to put a piece in wood shavings (or something else) to get something to compare to. A microwave would work too. With a microwave you could just dry a similar sized piece from the same tree and see what percentage of weight loss. That way you would have an idea where your target is and how close you are. You could find it works well but only gets it down to, say, 25% and then goes slowly. You might also find that the KL touching the work does absorb the water but once it does it prevents moisture from going further out. If so simply removing them and putting them back in would put new KL next to the bowl and could speed up drying. It could take a few times experimenting to get a system that works. Even if it worked to go from say 50% to 25% moisture in a short time it could be worth it.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, TX
    Posts
    2,493
    I pulled the pieces out of the litter Tuesday and weighed. All the pieces had a small weight reduction, but nothing dramatic. The larger pieces with more surface area and contact with the litter had a little more weight loss by percentage but I think that wood shavings in paper would have done as well. Possibly using paper bags versus the trash bags would work better. I will continue with this test, but so far not impressed and more difficult handling the extra weight of litter versus wood shavings.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •