Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23

Thread: Any HVACR Pros Here - Question about Oxy/Acetylene Setup

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Conway, Arkansas
    Posts
    12,866
    Scott,
    Thank you for all the info you provided!
    My son is enjoying his 1st full time job in HVACR. He and I both, are learning how many tools he needs to do his daily work.
    Thanks & Happy Wood Chips,
    Dennis -
    Get the Benefits of Being an SMC Contributor..!
    ....DEBT is nothing more than yesterday's spending taken from tomorrow's income.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Hill, NC
    Posts
    2,358
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Peacock View Post
    Scott,
    Thank you for all the info you provided!
    My son is enjoying his 1st full time job in HVACR. He and I both, are learning how many tools he needs to do his daily work.
    You're welcome. A good set of gauges is the tool that is used the most, followed by a good multi-meter. I have both Fluke and Ideal meters, and prefer the Ideal clamp on model for HVAC. He will want one with voltage, amperage (current), ohm, and capacitor test capability. Many meters (such as my Fluke) have optional temperature probes, but if you go with a Fieldpiece manifold set it too has the temp probe option.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in the Land of Lincoln
    Posts
    1,191
    I was thinking when I went to welding school they told us if you were drawing the acetone out the flame would turn purple. I can't say even when using a rosebud that I ever have had that happen.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    4,507
    For HVAC work he will need an accurate platform scale for weighing in refrigerant. Make sure it is battery powered. I bought mine used for around $70. New they cost about $200 or more. Must be accurate to less then 1/2 ounce and weigh up to 40 pounds or 70 pounds.
    Mine has a nice valve feature that I have never used. It only works when plugged into an outlet. The scale itself is battery powered. I can hook the mainifold set up to the scales internal valves and program it to shut off when a given weight has been sent out of the tank. I think it can also shut down when the discharge pressure reaches a programed pressure. I think it is robinaire or TIF brand. I am sure they can be controlled remotely with a cell phone or bluetooth these days.
    Honestly I think the truck will come with the tanks, pump, and scales provided.
    Special flare nut wrenches are recommended for refrigerant line connections. Also a good flaring set and tubing benders. Not the spring type benders but the lever type. Probably 1/4" to 3/4" range will cover most stuff in residental work
    Bill D

    It is also a nice accurate shop scale for weighing wood for moisture content/density. Mixing chemical etc.
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 07-10-2020 at 12:57 AM.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Conway, Arkansas
    Posts
    12,866
    I was taught that if the brazing torch starts pulling acetone from the acetylene tank, the flame will burn with "sparkles" and that's the Acetone that is burning in the flame. I don't honestly know because I've never seen it happen before.
    Thanks & Happy Wood Chips,
    Dennis -
    Get the Benefits of Being an SMC Contributor..!
    ....DEBT is nothing more than yesterday's spending taken from tomorrow's income.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Conway, Arkansas
    Posts
    12,866
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott T Smith View Post
    You're welcome. A good set of gauges is the tool that is used the most, followed by a good multi-meter. I have both Fluke and Ideal meters, and prefer the Ideal clamp on model for HVAC. He will want one with voltage, amperage (current), ohm, and capacitor test capability. Many meters (such as my Fluke) have optional temperature probes, but if you go with a Fieldpiece manifold set it too has the temp probe option.
    Scott,
    I have helped him purchase tools like Fieldpiece, Fluke, Uniweld, YellowJacket, Klein, and more. Honestly, I'm amazed at how much trade tools cost these days for troubleshooting and repairing HVACR devices. The blasted leak detector I bought for him is a Fieldpiece that came highly recommended. That was a cool $310 delivered to the door. His Oxy/Acetylene setup should arrive by Monday then it will be checking around where to exchange his new and empty gas bottles for bottles filled with the proper gas for brazing.
    *sigh* The money bleeding continues.
    Thanks & Happy Wood Chips,
    Dennis -
    Get the Benefits of Being an SMC Contributor..!
    ....DEBT is nothing more than yesterday's spending taken from tomorrow's income.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in the Land of Lincoln
    Posts
    1,191
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis Peacock View Post
    Scott,
    I have helped him purchase tools like Fieldpiece, Fluke, Uniweld, YellowJacket, Klein, and more. Honestly, I'm amazed at how much trade tools cost these days for troubleshooting and repairing HVACR devices. The blasted leak detector I bought for him is a Fieldpiece that came highly recommended. That was a cool $310 delivered to the door. His Oxy/Acetylene setup should arrive by Monday then it will be checking around where to exchange his new and empty gas bottles for bottles filled with the proper gas for brazing.
    *sigh* The money bleeding continues.
    I would talk to your local welding gas distributor whomever it might be and see about a tank lease. It's not likely that they refill on the premises. All the bigger distributors have a hub in the area that they do all refilling at. They only operate the local distribution out of the store front and have dedicated facilities for refilling. I'm sure this is partly because of the safety procedures that have to be followed and the specialized equipment needed.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    4,507
    I see a lot of HVAC tools at pawn shops and ebay. I think a lot of folks try the trade and give it up. Maybe a government training program for tool purchases while in school. I would say quality tools should last a lifetime except for dry rot hoses. Not sure about digital gauges and scales.
    I am not aware that the tools have changed much since digital came out.
    Bill D

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •