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Thread: Hobbyist: Kreg Adaptive Cutting System?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
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    Hobbyist: Kreg Adaptive Cutting System?

    I am really trying to come up with a cost effective setup that also meets my needs. I came across the Kreg Adaptive cutting system, and it seemed to check off a lot of boxes. None the less how things appear in Youtube videos or blogs doesn't always translate into the real world. I'm likely going to be working with mostly dimensional lumber, or at the very least s3s from the sawmill, and sheet goods. Home projects like planter boxes, bathroom vanities, cabinets (shop quality mostly, but may want to redo my kitchen down the road), etc.

    I've been looking heavily at table saws, but I don't know if the investment and floor space is ideal. I'm ok with the footprint of a table saw if the benefit outweighs the use of space. I just don't know if a table saw will offer much more than a track saw and the Adaptive cutting system for my needs, and have the ability to fold up the table and hang up on a wall.


    https://www.woodcraft.com/products/k...aster-kit-kreg

  2. #2
    For that amount of money, I would look for a used contractor's saw. Or make a guide rail, and a grid table with folding legs.

  3. #3
    I think the Kreg will work for you about 80% of the time. As I see it, you will have problems with small wood pieces. Hard to get them under the track and cut them. You could get a couple handsaws and use them on small pieces, if you have a decent workbench with multiple ways to hold smaller pieces of wood easily. If you have casters on a tablesaw it can be snugged into a corner when not in use, but still takes up room you may not have.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
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    I used to have a Bosch 4100 contractor's table saw on the gravity rise stand. It was a very nice saw for the money and the gravity rise stand lets you fold up the legs and store the saw vertically, which doesn't take up much room. This setup can be had for $600. With a crosscut sled and miter gauge, maybe an outfeed table, you can get a lot done with it.


  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian W Evans View Post
    I used to have a Bosch 4100 contractor's table saw on the gravity rise stand. It was a very nice saw for the money and the gravity rise stand lets you fold up the legs and store the saw vertically, which doesn't take up much room. This setup can be had for $600. With a crosscut sled and miter gauge, maybe an outfeed table, you can get a lot done with it.
    One of my friends stationed here brought his 4100 with him for use in his garage shop. He built a great cabinet for it on lockable wheels that includes side and outfeed tables. It works well with his 2kVA step-down transformer.

  6. #6
    My setup is after decades of changes and includes a table saw (SawStop PCS) and a track saw (DeWalt). My extension table/work surface is a 3x7 foot bench with a dual layer top and 20mm holes on 4 inch centers in the top surface. I use rail dogs and regular dogs for crosscuts. I made the holes using a Woodrave router base and pegboard. It is surprisingly accurate.

    I have not used the Kreg track saw nor seen a review comparing it to others. There are lots of alternatives these days. The low end is probably the Wen - Izzy Swan reviewed it and decided to make it part of his shop. Most people seem to like the Makita in what I would call the mid priced range. It has the advantage of a Festool compatible rail over my DeWalt. If the Kreg cuts as well as the Makita or DeWalt it is a good alternative. It probably does.

    Their table setup is much cheaper than the Festool MFT and does similar things. One disadvantage is Kreg decided to use 3/4 holes instead of the normal 20mm. That limits you to their accessories. But it seems to be a well thought out table. I would look seriously at Ron Paulk's workbench design before getting this, however. You can set it up so you can break it down for storage, that is how he designed it. With dogs, I think it will do most if not all what a MFT or Kreg table will do. But it will take you time to make it.

    I think you can probably get by without a table saw but I also think you will be happier with at least a portable table saw. It is much easier to use the table saw on small pieces of wood, as has been mentioned, and to make joints. While I have a cabinet saw I think you can function fine with a smaller table saw if you have a track saw. That setup would take up less space. No reason you can't start with the track saw and see if you need a table saw too. A track saw will work well with a shop vac. A cabinet saw will need a DC. Many portable table saws will also work with a shop vac.

  7. #7
    Although I myself can't envision a shop without a table saw, from what I've seen it is definitely doable and a completely viable option when space is limited.

    A track saw/MFT table type setup is best suited sheet goods, but dimensional lumber can be ripped and cross cut as well. In fact, I use my track saw to establish a straight edge on boards to straighten an edge, trim off sapwood or defects.

    Dados, grooves, rabbets, etc. can be done with a router.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Engel View Post
    Although I myself can't envision a shop without a table saw, from what I've seen it is definitely doable and a completely viable option when space is limited.

    A track saw/MFT table type setup is best suited sheet goods, but dimensional lumber can be ripped and cross cut as well. In fact, I use my track saw to establish a straight edge on boards to straighten an edge, trim off sapwood or defects.

    Dados, grooves, rabbets, etc. can be done with a router.
    Yeah I am definitely looking at my overall big picture. I can deal with a table saw, but as it has already been mentioned in this thread you're going to need to have a dedicated DC system taking up even more space. I still have time before I pull the trigger, so I am going to think long and hard about the various projects I will (and can) be doing over the next 2-3 years and decide if this Kreg setup is right for me.

    I don't plan on getting a planer, jointer, drum sander, or other large items for a long time, so the DC will only have use for the table saw. I can simply use my shop vac for the track saw, router, ROS, etc.
    Last edited by Scott Winter; 06-25-2020 at 1:25 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Franklin, Tennessee
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Dwight View Post
    I think you can probably get by without a table saw but I also think you will be happier with at least a portable table saw. It is much easier to use the table saw on small pieces of wood, as has been mentioned, and to make joints. While I have a cabinet saw I think you can function fine with a smaller table saw if you have a track saw. That setup would take up less space. No reason you can't start with the track saw and see if you need a table saw too. A track saw will work well with a shop vac. A cabinet saw will need a DC. Many portable table saws will also work with a shop vac.
    This is very similar to my setup. I've got a Bosch 4100 (on the gravity rise stand), a Dewalt track saw, a Paulk-inspired work top, and a shop vac rigged up with a Dust Deputy and a smart switch. The track saw is used to cut sheet goods to size, the table saw can do rips and (with a sled) joinery cross cuts. Compared to most on this site, my projects (and abilities) are pretty modest, but in line with the projects you outlined earlier. My equipment is not the limiting factor in what I can accomplish in my part-time workshop, and I'm able to put all my toys away when I'm done playing and park the cars in the garage.

    Someday(!) I will upgrade to Sawstop grade equipment, but for now, the quality, footprint, and especially the budget fit my needs just fine. YMMV.

    As has been mentioned in many a thread, I think the key is to figure out what you want to build, and fit the tools to the task. There are a zillion ways to do this, but if you're not careful, you can spend a ton of money in the wrong areas.

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