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Thread: Adjustable outfeed table

  1. #1
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    Adjustable outfeed table

    I was at Home Depot today looking for Fathers Day deals (meh), but I have been thinking about making a new outfeed table for the cabinet saw. Right next to the door was a display of adjustable height workbenches. The 46" long one is about the size of the outfeed table I now use and am happy with, and it dawned on me that it might be a good idea for the start of a new adjustable outfeed table.

    The one I have been using has an old metal cart under it with wheels, kind of like a HD lumber cart only smaller. Years ago I made a temporary top on it out of an old formica desk top, which is raised up with about a 6" high space under the top where I keep jigs, and the like.

    It has worked out great, and the HD bench would make a good start for another, but with a lightweight cabinet underneath for storage of jigs etc. I especially like the adjustable top, because I could use it occasionally for other uses, like an outfeed table for my drum sander etc.

    I also use the current model for some assembly purposes if my regular workbench is already in use, another reason the wheels are handy. I could also run it over to augment the workbench if I need an extra wide or long space temporarily.

    It would definitely not be a heavy duty unit, but it doesn't have to be for my purposes. The fact that is is adjustable to the height of any tool or bench I have intrigues me.

    Any thoughts?
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  2. #2
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    I'm a major fan of adjustable height work surfaces. Given you want to use this one for outfeed support, too, be sure that it's height adjustability has enough fine adjustment to permit you to get it reasonably close to your saw table's height. Slightly lower is fine, but "a lot lower" doesn't really provide the support usually desired for longer workpieces.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    Up and down with a crank. Infinite adjustment within range.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Potter View Post
    Up and down with a crank. Infinite adjustment within range.
    That bodes well as long as the unit has reasonable weight handling for assembly work!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
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  6. #6
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    If itís the scissor type cart Iím thinking about, you loose storage space below. Iíd love to have one but canít give up that floorium.

  7. #7
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    I have been waffling on the Home Depot adjustable table myself. My concern is lateral force if things gt hung up. I keep waffling because due to the light weight construction I feel that it is one of those things where "as long as everything is fine, everything is fine". My latest attempt to convince myself involved some additions to help with structural strength. A drawer box or other storage fixture seems like it would do this and I am leaning toward it once again. The main thing stopping me is that I enjoy making items like this that are custom to my specific needs. It is also offset by the fact that I have a scissor lift table so a self-lifting function for heavy items is already at hand. I would not use the adjustment on the Home Depot table while much weight was on it; that is not what it is for.
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  8. #8
    I spent a lot of time thinking about outfeed tables. What I ended up doing was doing a 2X6 slab glue up, planed down to 4 1/2 at the end. Whole table weights north of 400, as it's the outfeed for the saw and router table both. Size of an aircraft carrier. Plenty of storage room for cabinets and drawers and jigs underneath. The important thing is height adjustability, as my concrete slab can move up to 1/4 inch with a lot of rain, wood moves, saw moves. I got some leveler feet online for 50$, and use a hex key to move each foot with a bottle jack lifting the corner. I can fine tune where the table meets the saw surface perfectly, I actually keep it 1/32 or 64 below so I never lip it with a board coming off saw. Can't tell you how much an outfeed table has improved safety, I'm no longer leaning over the saw to keep a long piece falling off the back. And the stability of a giant slab is awesome.

  9. #9
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    For my intended use, the lightweight construction is not a problem. My current temporary (over 10 yrs) one is about a quarter inch below the saw anyway, and has a bevel on the infeed side to avoid catches that might occur if I am sawing long items and pull the 24 X 48 table back to hold them. Do not want anything bigger, and no miter slots, because I rarely use the miter gage.

    The infinite adjustability is what interests me. I could use it on the two cabinet saws, my drum sander, for ripping on my 24" band saw, and the router table. It could also be a light duty assembly table if my bench is full. Maybe a light weight cabinet for holding jigs and templates underneath (?).

    One thing I would change is putting at least two good locking casters on to replace the originals.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  10. #10
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    If its one of theses https://www.googleadservices.com/pag...gQIDRBf&adurl= I have one and they work pritty good for a light weight work table and a out feed table, but difinetly not a work bench. and as stated its can only handle so much weight, it says Top: 300 lb. weight capacity ; Drawers: 35 lb. capacity
    Last edited by richard poitras; 07-01-2020 at 7:28 PM.
    Richard Poitras
    Central, Michigan....
    01-02-2006


  11. #11
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    As soon as I saw your post I looked up the tables you described. They are just what I needed for running slabs through my woodmaster drum sander (and maybe my planer if they fit). They are adjustable to precisely the level I need.
    I ordered the 72" version and picked it up this morning. I have not used it to catch slabs yet as that is still a two person job but so far I am happy with it. It feels very rigid and I expect it will work well for feeding / catching material.
    Last edited by Roger Bull; 07-01-2020 at 10:28 PM.

  12. #12
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    That's the one Richard. For my needs, 300# is more than enough.

    Interesting fact. I checked two HD locations near me, and they were not the same price. One was $30 less than the other for the same size. No drawers, rather make something I need.

    Question for you: Do you remember how the wheels attach on yours? Square flange with bolts, or threaded single bolt?
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  13. #13
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    I am looking at the no-drawer version. It goes low enough for my jointer and high enough for my bandsaw which are the two extremes of feed support requirements in my shop. Now you've gone and got me thinking about it again !!!
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  14. #14
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    The wheels on the Husky adjustable table attach with a single threaded bolt.

  15. #15
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    Sep 2007
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    Ames, IA
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    This looks like a good solution for me to use alternatively between my Sawstop and Dewalt 735 planer as out feed tables?

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