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Thread: New Hermes spindle

  1. #1

    New Hermes spindle

    Hi folks,

    Spindle question... The pressure knob on my TrophyMaster spindle no longer affects the float - it is always rigid no matter if it's completely screwed to the top or the bottom. Any hints to free it up short of sending it off to be rebuilt? I've never personally had a spindle off of a machine but am willing. I don't have a replacement spindle and we're a one-machine shop that can't be down for very long. (I'm looking for a 2nd table and/or a spare spindle.)

    Charles

  2. #2
    It's likely just froze up and needs to be freed, does it look like one of these?
    spndl.jpg

    If so, loosen the set screws holding it in the housing and drop it out...

    These are very simple really- Problem is, the slide and tube can 'weld' them selves together over time via surface rust that can form simply from humidity. What you need to do obviously is separate the slide from the spindle.
    spndl2.jpg

    First trick is to try to loosen the 'bond' by hand, and get the spindle tube to move up thru the outer slide ("slide" is my term, don't know what its actual name is )
    spndl3.jpg
    --work the outer slide loose from the spindle tube, but resist the urge to twist the slide! There's a tiny brass pin in the tube near the bottom of the slide, that fits into a slot in the slide to keep it from turning, and it's very easy to shear it off or push it into the tube! You may be able to fiddle with it enough to loosen it by hand. If not, if you have a rubber or leather hammer, or even a small length of 2x4 will work: remove the micrometer collar from the spindle, grasp the slide firmly with one hand, and lightly rap the bottom of the spindle to try to move it upward, OR place the wood on a table and drive the bottom of the spindle -gently but firmly- into the wood.

    If you can't get it to move, some WD40 or Liquid Wrench is in order; with the spindle upright, apply it all around the snap ring and let it soak in awhile, and try again...

    Once you get it to move: all you need is some snap ring pliers to remove the snap ring at the top--
    snprng.jpg

    and pull the slide off and remove the spring-- you may need to use the wood trick to get it to move the other way. If it's real bad, you may need to use a wood dowel or similar to fully remove the spindle from the slide...
    spapt.jpg
    --you can see my spindle has sign's of surface rust. Just remove the guck, from the tube and inside the slide, with scotchbrite or steel wool. Wipe both area's afterward with some oil, then remove all the oil you can with a paper towel or rag. These things like DRY, oil just attracts dirt...

    Also note look hard you can see my spindle's brass pin is pushed in -- that's why don't twist!

    Hope this helps---

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    Last edited by Kev Williams; 06-16-2020 at 2:23 PM.
    ========================================
    ELEVEN - rotary cutter tool machines
    FOUR - CO2 lasers
    THREE - fiber lasers
    ONE - vinyl cutter
    CASmate, Corel, Gravostyle


  3. #3
    Kev,

    Excellent reply! Thanks for the pics too - it got me to donate! With this info, I'm emboldened to go at it.

    I have only ever used the software depth control to engrave brass, 99% under 1"x4". I have never used a nose cone/micrometer but I wanted to engrave a larger area and thought I might need the nose cone. I figured I'd need the slide to be working too. I have a Delrin nose cone but not sure if it would scratch lacquered brass.

    Thanks for the reply - yes it'll help.

    C

  4. #4
    -A N Y T H I N G- that touches that lacquered brass will scratch it! And Delrin won't help because the engraved chips will embed into it. What you want to do is engrave a couple of square inches at a time, zeroing out your tool for each area...

    For the record, all 11 of my rotary machines, 2 of my lasers and the vinyl cutter are Gravograph/New Hermes
    ========================================
    ELEVEN - rotary cutter tool machines
    FOUR - CO2 lasers
    THREE - fiber lasers
    ONE - vinyl cutter
    CASmate, Corel, Gravostyle


  5. #5
    Hey Kev, Thanks again for the spindle tutorial - I was able to free it up by hand once it was off of the machine - thanks for the note on the brass pin; I would have tried to twist as well. It had a good bit of tarnishing/rust but I got it all cleaned out and it performs now better than ever. I know the TM gets some knocks but this has been a workhorse for 17 years so it's a keeper. I just got a line on a local IS400 with GS5 that I'm going to go after so I can speed up my throughput.

  6. #6
    17 years, barely broke in! -My NEWEST Gravograph tool-machine is 15 years old, the oldest, still used every day, is 37...

    Glad you got 'er fixed up
    ========================================
    ELEVEN - rotary cutter tool machines
    FOUR - CO2 lasers
    THREE - fiber lasers
    ONE - vinyl cutter
    CASmate, Corel, Gravostyle


  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Glenn View Post
    Kev,

    I have never used a nose cone/micrometer but I wanted to engrave a larger area and thought I might need the nose cone. I figured I'd need the slide to be working too. I have a Delrin nose cone but not sure if it would scratch lacquered brass.C
    Maybe you need to look into burnishers. Carbide works for brass, diamond will work for brass, alum & glass. You will need the slide working, the "knurled barrel" above the spring increases/decreases your pressure, which you will need to lighten up for burnishing.

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