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Thread: Going Neander' Well, probably mostly... or at least a lot more...

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    N. Idaho
    Posts
    1,140
    Jerome, you must have more Neander in you than I!

    I have a nice bandsaw and it has definitely paid for itself by allowing me to efficiently dimension lumber from free and near free sources of wood. And shop-sawn veneer is a favored theme. Definitely, hands-down, would be the last power tool I sold.

    Erich, have been enjoying watching your projects and good luck with the shop rearrangements.

    Best,
    Chris
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  2. #47
    Congrats on selling your table saw. I would recommend the following book for a hybrid woodworker, it is by Jim Tolpin and is called "The new traditional woodworker". https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/14...imtolpincom-20.

    In my experience the following tools compliment a hybrid shop well. A 15-16" bandsaw (PM1500), festool TS-55 (can be used for jointing edges and crosscutting boards--with Peter Parfits crosscut jigs it is better than an MFT, 12" dewalt planer, and a drill press. I have a dedicated crosscut parf guide board that is setup with a fixed 90 degree fence w/flip stops for the festool TS55 that I set on-top of sawhorses or a workbench when dedicated crosscuts are needed and stores on the wall when not in use.

    I also have a portable dewalt 8.25" table saw that is stored in a shed and Kapex on a rolling stand that I only use outdoors on the occasional home DIY project. These tools are the largest dust producers which is why they aren't used inside my shop. Good luck, I think you will find that hybrid woodworking is enjoyable and certain machines enhance that experience and do not detract from it.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Warwick, RI
    Posts
    401
    My answer to planers are handplanes and a 19x38 drum sander. I have small bandsaw that handles most of ripping needs. I may upgrade that someday but I really don't have much need for instruments. I get my back and sides cut almost to size and then run through the DS to final dimensions. I love hybrid woodworking but try to steer towards hand tools whenever possible.

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    462
    Thank John,

    I actually have a Festool tracksaw (and jigsaw, and ROS, and Domino...) So I'll probably never be totally neander. But I find I only want to use the tracksaw on plywood. I am hand sawing all solid wood. I also will probably never get rid of my drill press. Just used it the other day to drill some clearance holes in steel to put some casters on my lathe stand. Can't imagine doing that by hand.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    462
    Well, I sold the Tablesaw to a friend who has no interest in hand tools, but does have interest in keeping his fingers.
    The Festool SCMS went to a co-worker (who I had no idea was a woodworker) who is also a creeker and saw the classified post. Small world!

    Up next, need to get rid of the giant air compressor.

    Also, I bought a lathe and bed extension... it is now on retractable casters. But this was a step backwards for freeing up shop space. Doh!

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,772
    Yes from your picture the air compressor has to go.

    When My MIL bought me a lathe it refreshed my interest in woodworking. I don't use it much but it's great to be able to add turned details to otherwise uninteresting pieces. Little turned columns for shelf dividers, urned legs on my bench, and on the mailbox, and many more. OTOH I really have no use for turned bowls or plates.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    23,408
    Blog Entries
    1
    Also, I bought a lathe and bed extension...
    A lathe comes in handy for making tool handles. Most of my chisels have shop made handles.

    My current project is a small stool for SWMBO. Two of the three legs have been finished on the lathe.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    462
    I got the lathe because I want to (eventually) do chairs. It is fun, but I'm already seeing I'm going to have to get a wheeled stand for the grinder. It needs to get used too frequently while turning to have to pull it out from under the router table. There goes some more floor space. (Sigh).

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
    Posts
    918
    Quote Originally Posted by Erich Weidner View Post
    ... It needs to get used too frequently while turning to have to pull it out from under the router table. There goes some more floor space. (Sigh).
    Could you mount it on a base, e.g. 18mm, or greater, baltic birch plywood and get that out when turning and clamp it to something solid but not used so much when turning? E.g. the end of your work bench.

    That way you can stow it between turning (& sharpening) sessions and avoid tying up the floor space, but still have it out while actually turning.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    462
    Thanks David. Actually, I already did that. Kind of had to to mount the wolverine sharpening jig. I also added some handles.
    It is just a pain to have to fish it out each time, but I guess I should just not be so lazy. The floor space is precious. Bonus, it is heavy enough I don't need to clamp it down.

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