Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: oscillators with plunge bases?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Posts
    181

    oscillators with plunge bases?

    Besides the Festool Vecturo are there any other oscilaltors that have a plunge base attachment? 600 bucks is a tad too much and I keep getting routers in my google searches. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,231
    Do you already have a Fein? I see articles about connecting a Fein multitool to the Festool plunge base. The base costs $150, not $600. For instance

    http://forum.toolsinaction.com/topic...timaster-350q/ and

    https://www.festoolownersgroup.com/o...w-plunge-base/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Posts
    181
    thanks, I'll look into it. Don't have any tools now but am shopping around

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
    Posts
    3,775
    How would a plunge base on an oscillator be beneficial?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,231
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Rozmiarek View Post
    How would a plunge base on an oscillator be beneficial?
    IMHO, those oscillating saws are pretty crude tools -- kinda like Sawzalls on a smaller scale. They're completely hand-guided, and particularly if you attempt to plunge it straight into a workpiece it dances around until it finally bites. Perhaps a plunge base for it would offer better control. I'm not saying I'd spend $150 find out if it does -- just trying to guess an answer to your question.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Western Nebraska
    Posts
    3,775
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    IMHO, those oscillating saws are pretty crude tools -- kinda like Sawzalls on a smaller scale. They're completely hand-guided, and particularly if you attempt to plunge it straight into a workpiece it dances around until it finally bites. Perhaps a plunge base for it would offer better control. I'm not saying I'd spend $150 find out if it does -- just trying to guess an answer to your question.
    I agree. They are useful but I can't see how a plunge base improves anything. The only thing that I could think of was if someone was trying to plunge for mortises but that wouldn't work very well. Would make lots of smoke though.

  7. #7
    I recently used a wooden straight edge and oscillating tool to cut the ends off an open staircase; to convert it to a ďcapturedĒ staircase. The stringer is varnished, not painted, so no caulking to cover up mistakes. Thankfully the treads and risers were fir. The straight edge makes these tools fairly precise, at least in one direction. A vertical guide, like a plunge base, would guide the saw in the other direction. With the stairs, there was some hand tool cleanup on the vertical plane, but the long lines came out perfectly.

    There are much better and a wider variety of blades available than a few years ago. Blade selection goes a long way toward better results.

    This is a tool that really excels in remodeling. I donít have much use for it in woodworking, but I wonder how I ever worked without one in construction.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    53,294
    Eric, I bought one last year (Ridgid) to help with a home repair where it was the right tool for the job. I'd previously not even considered one for my stable of tools. That said, I never considered a vertical stand like the OP is asking about. I'm sure there are operations where that might be useful.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #9
    I have three oscillating tools, a HF (forgot that one in the other thread), a cordless Ryobi (useful for drywall work), and a Fein. I bought the Festool plunge base and have used it attached to the Fein. One usage was to make a square hole for a newel post in an oak thread. With a good blade, the Fein cut the hole easily and accurately. It still is not something I would routinely use in woodworking although it could be used to flush cut plugs and things like that. That is one of the few things I use hand tools for, however.

  10. #10
    Jim, Iím not even sure what Iíd use a plunge base for, but Festool finds ways to solve problems we didnít even know we had. Fein did the same when they built the Multimaster.

    I really like the brushless motors and variable speed in the trigger. My Fein has been sitting in its box for months since I picked up a cordless Dewalt.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •