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Thread: Project: Fixed Pane Windows

  1. #31
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    Feb 2009
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    Looks really good, Jim. I did drive by your house a week or so ago and made it a point to look at the door you did, which looks great. These windows are going to be a nice upgrade.
    And there was trouble, taking place...

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Mueller View Post
    I also like the fact that you left the existing sill and outside framing. Keeps the character in tact.
    The window frames and sills are integral to the structure. They are built like "post and beam" including wood pins through the joints. Stiles and top rail are something like 5x5 and the sill is even more massive. No way would they come out of the wall without damaging the stone. For as old as they likely are (may or more likely may not be original) they are in remarkably good condition.

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    Thanks for the kind words, folks.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #33
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    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Wurster View Post
    Looks really good, Jim. I did drive by your house a week or so ago and made it a point to look at the door you did, which looks great. These windows are going to be a nice upgrade.
    Thanks! The front of the building will look even better once I have the windows in. It will look "half good" first, however, since only the one closest to the rest of the house will get done initially. That room will then become Professor Dr. SWMBO's office so I can do the more involved work required in the other room at the end of that portion of the building. You're welcome to come take a closer look...just need a mask.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
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    Averill Park NY
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    123
    Great looking windows. For your beautiful home!
    Some Blue Tools
    Some Yellow Tools
    And a Pet Grizzly
    ShapeokoXL
    Blue and White 50 Watt

  5. #35
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Thanks, Clark. Since you saw it up close and personal, you can appreciate why I'm trying to "keep the look" while dealing with the problem.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    WNY
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    Looks great Jim. With the old trim back on you'd never know it's a new sash behind it. It was a lot of work but I'd say well worth it to keep the architectural integrity.

    John

  7. #37
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    Jan 2007
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    Michiana
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    Are these single glazed or dual glazed?
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  8. #38
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    Are these single glazed or dual glazed?
    Double glazed, insulated, low-E glass panels that I had made to size. They are replacing single glazed (actuall "glazed" where the glaze is still present) worn out single-hung sashes that are "darn old".
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #39
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    Jan 2007
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    Michiana
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    Glad you had the IGU made. I’m in the window manufacturing business. We make over 2,000,000 IGU annually. I’ve seen folks make their own dual glazed windows by putting glass on both sides of the wood muntin bars. They’re pretty at first but fog up immediately.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Yea, getting them made to specification made sense, Rob. I do a lot of things DIY in addition to my woodworking, but glass is what it is and best left to the pros, including for the reason you state.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #41
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    Mar 2003
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    Number two is installed...numbers three and four will happen when I renovate the other room after moving Professor Dr. SWMBO's office out of it. No sense in the disruption now and the one on the back side can be used for loading in materials for the floor replacement which eliminates some awkward material handling.

    This one is on the front side of the building that faces the road. Before:

    IMG_7819.jpg

    The new pane slipped in easier this time as I took another sixteenth off the width to insure I didn't have to work too hard while on a platform a foot and a half off the ground. A tiny bit more caulk, but that's what it's for.

    IMG_7822.jpg

    And...finished up after repairing the punky sill, priming bare and the old frame and then two new coats of color.

    IMG_7823.jpg

    IMG_7824.jpg

    There is pretty much zero road noise in this room now and the heat of the sun is mitigated with the low-e glass. That's going to be a very comfortable room for Professor Dr. SWMBO's new office.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #42
    Jim,

    Don't use Poplar if it is going to be outside, or exposed to weather, Poplar is horrible for exterior applications. It rots extremely easy outside.

  13. #43
    Jim is one of the "old wise ones". The green poplar is much better than the white, I've had good luck with it.

  14. #44
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Alison View Post
    Jim,

    Don't use Poplar if it is going to be outside, or exposed to weather, Poplar is horrible for exterior applications. It rots extremely easy outside.
    I'm very aware of tulip poplar's properties having used thousands of board feet of it, much of which was harvested on our property. There's no direct exposure of the bare wood to the elements here and I expect a future owner will also replace these windows with custom sized working sashes. Clear pine was not available as an alternative without buying a large quantity.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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