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Thread: Prepping solid wood before cutting.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    837

    Prepping solid wood before cutting.

    I'm learning my new toy, a Shaper Origin.

    For now I'm making some gag gift coasters and some door signs.

    I'm making these out of solid wood, Maple, Walnut and Cherry.

    I plan to engrave the design and then airbrush the cut out engraved areas with paint.

    I wonder if there is a sealer I could coat the wood with before I start CNC'ing, so when I airbrush the paint doesn't bleed so much into the grain on the top surface that will remain natural wood.

    My first test project, I engraved to around .7mm, but by the time I sanded the surface to remove the overspray, in the pores of the wood, I nearly sanded the design out.

    If a sealer is not an option, I'll just have to engrave a little deeper.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Many use Oramask for this purpose. I have some but have yet to use it.

    David
    David
    CurlyWoodShop on Etsy, David Falkner on YouTube, difalkner on Instagram

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    52,993
    Yes, Mask is a normal way to do this kind of thing if the general surface will remain flat. Oramask, like Dave mentions, is the "better" product for this because it's adhesion properties are more designed for the purpose, but you can use clear "Contact Shelf Liner". It may lift a little in sharp corners, however. It's also a good practice after cutting through the mask, to use some wax free shellac to seal the wood and mask edges before spraying your paint into the recesses to avoid paint bleed into end grain and reduce creep under the mask.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
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    837
    Thank you both, that pointed me in what I think is the right direction.

    After Youtube searches for Oramask, I found a few videos that I think will solve my problem.

    From what I've gathered, these seem to be the steps.

    1) Prepare surface sanded to 220.
    2) Use a couple of coats of Sanding Sealing or Shellac on uncut finished surface, light sanding between coats.
    3) Apply Oramask.
    4) Cut design with CNC.
    5) Apply Sanding sealer to cut areas lightly, most likely via airbrush.
    6) Apply Acrylic paint as desired to cut areas.
    7) Peel off Oramask and lightly sand entire surface, hopefully to remove any minimal bleeding.
    8) Apply finish, which will probably be Polyurethane.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    52,993
    That's a good list in general. One step after applying the mask is to insure it's "down"...a rubber roller is your friend here.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Red Deer, Alberta
    Posts
    860
    a rubber roller is your friend here.
    As is sharp tools. Dull bits and mask don't go well together...
    Funny, I don't remember being absent minded...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    837
    Followed the suggestions above, that Oramask worked out well. Wife is happy.


  8. #8
    Glad it worked for you; project looks good!

    David
    David
    CurlyWoodShop on Etsy, David Falkner on YouTube, difalkner on Instagram

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,993
    Really nice work!! But I will admit that for a spit second I thought that was some kind of alien being in the graphic. LOL
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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