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Thread: A Journey of 100 Feet - Windows to Apple

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Michigan
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    A Journey of 100 Feet - Windows to Apple

    When I retired 4 years ago and turned in my company laptop I switched to Apple.

    Pro
    Many problems disappeared. Some were things like malware and some were related to the new software work was constantly pushing out for my convenience.

    Was worried about tech support but Apple help is very good. Not as committed as we had at work but good enough so far. Not sure what I would have had with Windows.

    Con
    I had to learn to use another big load of software (Apple). I will never be as capable with it as I was with Windows but I don't need to be.

    Could not live without Excel and missed Word and Powerpoint so I bought these to run inside Apple. They open slowly but they work.

    A Journey of 100 Feet is one of my favorite movies.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    I was in same situation a few years ago but with perseverance proficiency comes. The filing system used by Apple was the biggest challenge. Some things like “time machine” I use, but still do not quite like how it works. Anyway, I am happy that the switch to Apple was made.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    The old pueblo in el norte.
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    The easiest thing is to just let it be what it is. If you try and make it windows it'll be painful.

    FWIW, Office was available on Apple based computers before PCs
    ~mike

    scope creep

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Lots of good things to like about Mac computers but my favorite is the ability to choose your boot drive at startup.

    So if you keep a current external clone (or 2) and your main computer's HD fails, you can boot from the clone- even as an external disk- and keep on keepin' on.

  5. #5
    I thought about switching, once, and visited an Apple store.

    They had a chihuahua...wearing a very small (chihuahua-sized) Apple store employee T-shirt?

    I picked up a laptop, couldn't figure out how to turn it on, accidentally set off the security alarm in the process, and the dog started barking at me.

    I decided that I was fine with my PC.

  6. #6
    I went to work for a company many years ago and they used Apple computers. The one I had was very slow. But I found it pretty easy to switch from Windows to the Apple - the basic concepts were the same.

    But then the company switched to Windows PCs. Not sure why but one day they replaced my Apple with a PC. I was experienced on a PC so no problems for me.

    Since then I've stayed with the PC although I have a Apple iPhone and use iCloud for both the iPhone and the PC.

    One thing I found is that it's slow and difficult to get pictures directly off the iPhone (through a USB cable) but the phone uploads the pictures fairly quickly to iCloud and I can get the pictures off iCloud through a browser.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  7. #7
    The only Apple computers I've ever had are the two Apple IIe's that came with my first 2 computer driven engravers back in the early 80's. They'll likely be the last Apples too. I have 11 CNC rotary tool engravers, 4 C02 lasers, 3 fiber lasers and a vinyl cutter in my house, and I don't think a one of 'em will run on an Apple. Maybe the fibers, not sure really. But there's one thing about Apple that just irks me: They build a pretty good computer, I-pads are nice, but their I-phones... They're great as 'smart' devices go, they have a pretty good camera, do lots of cool things, but as TELEPHONES go, they're in DEAD LAST place. People talking on I-phones, to my ears, sound like they're inside a sheet metal box being dragged down a highway littered with mattress springs. After 13 years, why can't they make the phone talk decent? So- I have to wonder what Apple has 'let slide' about their computers over the years?

    That said, it's not like I have any shining reviews for Windows, what with 'forced obsolescence' being their main business model. What I find hard to believe, is that Microsoft hasn't figured out how much more money they could make by simply collecting subscription money people like me would gladly pay for ongoing automatic updates for XP and 7, rather than being forced into the Win10 black hole...

    Computers...
    ========================================
    ELEVEN - rotary cutter tool machines
    FOUR - CO2 lasers
    THREE - fiber lasers
    ONE - vinyl cutter
    CASmate, Corel, Gravostyle


  8. #8
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    Minneapolis, MN
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    4,184
    The biggest issue with Apple Mac computers for most consumers is they cost so darn much compared to a Windows PC. There are lots of pros and some cons for buying a Mac.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kev Williams View Post
    People talking on I-phones, to my ears, sound like they're inside a sheet metal box being dragged down a highway littered with mattress springs. After 13 years, why can't they make the phone talk decent? So- I have to wonder what Apple has 'let slide' about their computers over the years?
    I haven't really noticed that, other than people who put it on speaker then hold the phone right in front of their face. But using the phone as a handset (and not smashed into their cheek), or with a normal headset.. it seems to be fine.


    Now, from a development standpoint.. it's literally impossible to maintain 20 year old operating systems indefinitely.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Elfert View Post
    The biggest issue with Apple Mac computers for most consumers is they cost so darn much compared to a Windows PC. There are lots of pros and some cons for buying a Mac.
    I agree. The computers are pretty, but obscenely expensive, and the internal build quality is atrocious, at least partly by design. Check out Louis Rossmann’s repair videos. Unfortunately, Mac OS X is the best (mainstream) OS in the business by far (and my experience with Linux variations and Windows stretches from the present back through the mists of time.) So I’m kind of stuck with that.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    ...and the internal build quality is atrocious, at least partly by design. Check out Louis Rossmann’s repair videos.
    So this at least partly answers my 'what has Apple has let slide' question
    ========================================
    ELEVEN - rotary cutter tool machines
    FOUR - CO2 lasers
    THREE - fiber lasers
    ONE - vinyl cutter
    CASmate, Corel, Gravostyle


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    The old pueblo in el norte.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    I agree. The computers are pretty, but obscenely expensive, and the internal build quality is atrocious, at least partly by design. Check out Louis Rossmann’s repair videos. Unfortunately, Mac OS X is the best (mainstream) OS in the business by far (and my experience with Linux variations and Windows stretches from the present back through the mists of time.) So I’m kind of stuck with that.
    It's fully application supported Unix, and I love it for that.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    837
    I'm a retired software developer. I started back in the '70s on IBM mainframes, moved to HP mini's in the early 80's and since the mid 80's to around 2010 have been developing DOS and Window based software using various computer languages.

    Around 2010, the wife persuaded me to get an Apple laptop. I'd probably used an Apple computer for all of about 30 minutes in the prior 30 years.

    It was a bit of a learning curve, but I don't miss my old Window platforms.

    I do feel a bit removed from the workings of the software, maybe because I've never developed on IOS.

    I'm on my second MacBook Pro and I guess we have drunk the Apple KoolAid and have a house littered with iPhones, iPads, etc..

  14. #14
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    I switched back in 2010 at home and two years later switched for work via approved BYOD. I was constantly having all kinds of frustrating things with the company provided laptops including both hardware and software issues. They all went away when I bought that MBPr13. For the few things I needed to use Windows for, I just ran it in a VM via Parallels. I got my own Office 365 subscription and used that for Word, PowerPoint and Excel...and there was zero slowness. In fact, that machine was noticeably faster than any of the Windows machines I had been issued by the company. My Mid-2010 iMac still runs almost like new and is kept as a spare in my office. My primary machine is now a 2019 Macbook Pro 15" and I still use the mid-2012 Macbook Pro 13" retina in my shop as a second machine when I don't want to stand and use the CNC machine for looking things up, etc. They all "just work" and I've also had good support experiences the few times I had to use it. The only "repair" has been a new battery for the 2012 MBPr13 and they conveniently swapped out a few other things at no charge at the same time they were doing the battery replacement which involved a new top case because it's a fixed battery.

    Younger daughter uses a Macbook Air that she got when she was 16 and she's now about to turn 21. It still runs and looks like new. And we're all iPhone/iPad/AppleTV here, too. Stuff just works.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I switched back in 2010 at home and two years later switched for work via approved BYOD. I was constantly having all kinds of frustrating things with the company provided laptops including both hardware and software issues. They all went away when I bought that MBPr13. For the few things I needed to use Windows for, I just ran it in a VM via Parallels. I got my own Office 365 subscription and used that for Word, PowerPoint and Excel...and there was zero slowness. In fact, that machine was noticeably faster than any of the Windows machines I had been issued by the company. My Mid-2010 iMac still runs almost like new and is kept as a spare in my office. My primary machine is now a 2019 Macbook Pro 15" and I still use the mid-2012 Macbook Pro 13" retina in my shop as a second machine when I don't want to stand and use the CNC machine for looking things up, etc. They all "just work" and I've also had good support experiences the few times I had to use it. The only "repair" has been a new battery for the 2012 MBPr13 and they conveniently swapped out a few other things at no charge at the same time they were doing the battery replacement which involved a new top case because it's a fixed battery.

    Younger daughter uses a Macbook Air that she got when she was 16 and she's now about to turn 21. It still runs and looks like new. And we're all iPhone/iPad/AppleTV here, too. Stuff just works.
    In case you didn’t already know this, there’s a “secret” repair program that Apple has, to repair/replace the keyboards on late-2016+ 15” MBP’s (IOW. All of them for the past 4 years) for 4 years after date of purchase. I’m so grateful that I was able to mothball this Spawn Of Satan and buy a new 16” MBP. The keyboard was just that awful. I had to use an external for any serious work.

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