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Thread: First Furniture Project...Questions before I begin

  1. #16
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    Mar 2003
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    San Francisco, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa Starr View Post
    Jim - our home was built in 1838 on what was the frontier at the time. Strangely, (I think) the interior walls were framed with these rough sawn DF planks on flat. We re-framed with 2x4 for modern conveniences like electrical outlets. I saved the DF. Most are 14-16 wide, 2 or 2-1/2" thick around 9' long.
    Douglas Fir in Pennsylvania? My understanding is that the native range of Doug Fir is in the Rockies and west. I've seen pictures of Southern Yellow Pine, and it looks a lot like Doug Fir to me.

  2. #17
    Never heard of Doug. Fir being on East coast that early. Does Canada have it ?

  3. #18
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    Jun 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    Never heard of Doug. Fir being on East coast that early. Does Canada have it ?
    Mel thatís a good point. Itís would ridicules to haul Fir from the west coast back then. I could only imagine the Carpenters asking what wrong thereís trees right here.
    Aj

  4. #19
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    Nov 2013
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    Waterford, PA
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    Never thought about that...I'll have to research what else it might be that was more local at the time. It definitely looks and acts like Douglas Fir, but it makes no sense, if it wasn't native. I'll do more research and report back.

  5. #20
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa Starr View Post
    Jim - our home was built in 1838 on what was the frontier at the time. Strangely, (I think) the interior walls were framed with these rough sawn DF planks on flat. We re-framed with 2x4 for modern conveniences like electrical outlets. I saved the DF. Most are 14-16 wide, 2 or 2-1/2" thick around 9' long.
    Now I'm really drooling over that material. But I feel the same way about the wide pine floors we have, especially in the 250 year old portion of the home upstairs. Can't get stuff like that anymore.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #21
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    Dec 2006
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    Toronto Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa Starr View Post
    Never thought about that...I'll have to research what else it might be that was more local at the time. It definitely looks and acts like Douglas Fir, but it makes no sense, if it wasn't native. I'll do more research and report back.
    Douglas fir was common in the east, shipped by rail from the west coast.

    A few years ago I bought a lot of original growth Douglas Fir timbers from the Distillery District in Toronto.

    Do a google search on Distillery District Timber....Regards, Rod

  7. #22
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    Mar 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod Sheridan View Post
    Douglas fir was common in the east, shipped by rail from the west coast.
    This home was built in 1838. At that date, the US had less than 3000 miles of railroad, all east of the Mississippi. The first transcontinental railroad wasn't complete until 1869.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    How are the blocks held to the apron. Are they glued or do they have a tongue that goes into a slot on the apron. The slot on the apron method allows for wood movement. If glued solid then you need slots for the screws.
    Bil lD

  9. #24
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    Sep 2016
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    Modesto, CA, USA
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    Maybe start search here? maybe hemlock or pine?
    https://www.admoyer.com/blog/history...ia-bpid_9.aspx

  10. #25
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    May 2013
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    Northern Virginia
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    745
    Hemlock would be my first guess for Pennsylvania frontier softwood lumber.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Northern Illinois
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    579
    Loose tenons versus mortise and tenon? - For me, this is really a question about which you feel most comfortable doing. From a joint strength standpoint, mortise and tenon may be stronger, but not much really. Do whichever you feel you do the best or, if you want to try something new, try the one you haven't done before.

    As for top expansion/contraction, you should expect some, and maybe a lot, if you live in a climate where there are significant humidity variations between seasons. An easy way to attach a table top is with "table clips" which fit into a slot cut in the side of the table apron and are screwed to the top. Because the clips are not screwed into the sides (only the top), they top can expand and contract with no cracking. Clips are sold at Rockler and Woodcraft and probably other places. Very inexpensive and easy to install.

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