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Thread: Cross Cut Sled

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Orange Park, FL
    Posts
    982

    Cross Cut Sled

    What is a good choice for plywood and runners for a sled?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Elmodel, Ga.
    Posts
    534
    I used baltic birch ply and red oak for the runners. Haven't had a problem in 4 years. Some people have used hdpe or similar plastic for the runners since humitity and seasonal changes won't affect it. Some have used miter track or even aluminum miter bars. As long as there is no slop in the material.
    SWE

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lewiston, Idaho
    Posts
    27,335
    I made mine using baltic birch plywood for the body and red oak for the runners like Steve.
    Ken

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Orange Park, FL
    Posts
    982
    Thank you gentlemen. I have a 1988 Delta Unisaw. Any advice on dimensions?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,783
    1/2" BB, like the others and ash for the runners. As William Ng points out, orienting the grain of wood runners to be as vertical as possible does help combat seasonal movement. Still, I experienced about a 3 year tweaking period (especially on a double runner sled) where the runners would need minute sanding / trimming in place to make them glide perfectly again. After that, smooth sailing every time I use it.

    As to size, I have ended up with 5 or 6 sleds for my Delta Contractors table saw- I bought it in 1975ish so it is much sturdier than todays contractor saws. Two Incra and four shop made. I have one that can crosscut 4' plywood but the go-to sled is 25" between front and back fences to be able to handle 24" plywood for cabinets. I used a leftover BB ply piece and wish I hadn't as I feel it isn't wide enough. At the very least, go all the way out to the left wing of your TS.

    I have SMC to thank for my sleds- woodworking got better after I joined. If you haven't watched William Ng's you tube video on adjusting the fence to be perfectly square, that's a must see.

    Using an accurate sled over any miter gauge that drags the workpiece across the saw top is superior IMO.

  6. #6
    ENCO, now MSC sells pieces of aluminum that are exactly 3/4" wide X 3/8" thick. They only come in 24" lengths though. That's my weapon of choice.

  7. #7
    I used a quarter sheet of birch veneer plywood from Home Depot for the base, the back stop is a piece of 2 x 2 oak left over from a deacon bench project and a scrap piece of cherry for the runner. It has remained flat and square to the blade.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    2,498
    I use the Incra Miter Slider bars. Yes, a bit more expensive but very adjustable to fit EXACTLY and do not change with weather. If they get loose, it is easy to adjust. When a sled gets worn out, I tried the miter slider bar. I have been using the same one for years.

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