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Thread: Jointer Technique

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2020
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    Jointer Technique

    I recently purchased a Grizzly G0855 jointer and have never owned or used one prior to this purchase. Are there any good reference videos out there for proper technique that people recommend? While a wide board laying flat going across is pretty straightforward, a shorter board on it's side is a bit unclear to me. As an example, running something like a 2x4 through makes me nervous. I'd like to learn proper technique up front for my safety and of course quality of work. Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Hi Gabriel,
    Here are several videos that may be helpful to you.
    David

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3d1qBxcnI0E
    Jointer Safety.jpg

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bbHwoi4kz8
    What Dies a Jointer Do.jpg

    This one may be good too, although I cringe watching him using his jointer with no push blocks.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlNo5_gD94E
    jointer and planer.jpg
    Last edited by David Buchhauser; 05-31-2020 at 1:52 AM.

  3. #3
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    Dec 2018
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    Washington DC
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    For what it's worth, there's safety, which is absolutely #1, and then there is the result. Which, when I started with jointers (and even now from time to time) can drive you nuts no matter how many videos you watch. I'd get a bunch of 2x6 lumber, a good straightedge and square, and get to work.

  4. #4
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    The biggest mistake folks make when learning to use their jointers is pressing down on the material, particularly on the infeed side. The whole idea behind a jointer is to take off the high spots remaining with each pass until the board is flat/straight.

    Safety is all about keeping your hands and fingers away from the cutterhead in all operations and that includes using appropriate aids like push blocks when necessary to insure one's digits are not where they shouldn't be. This is especially true with smaller stock being worked. Also keep clothing away.

    There is always debate about gloves when working rough stock to prevent splinters. In general, they shouldn't be used, but some folks do, particularly for face jointing wide boards, including myself. Make any choice wisely based on risk.A jointer head can chew up body parts really fast and really well...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    SoCal
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    The jointer and planer are a team. Good video but, subscibers only: https://www.finewoodworking.com/memb.../011160064.pdf

    Another video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gfGRW9VlWkI

    Jointer and planer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5G1PUkiCBbU
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  6. #6
    +1 for Jim’s comments. #1 issue I see is people white-knuckling boards on the way through. If you have a spiral head, feel for the board “sucking down” to the fence or the cast iron table and it will tell you how fast to feed. Other tips:

    -Good coat of paste wax on fence face and cast iron tops.
    -Invest in good push blocks. I’m a big fan of the Gripper.
    -I personally wear gloves but only the fitted Mecanix or elastic fabric-type ones with the nitrile palms. It’s the oversized, floppy, welding-type gloves that will get you into trouble.

    Best of luck with it.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Collegeville PA (30 min west of Philly)
    Posts
    695
    After reading some old posts here recently, I bought a pair of coarse red rubber floats (typically used for plaster finishing) as my push tools. I've been very happy with how well they grip material, they offer nice control, and the price was very reasonable.

    One such option: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


    The guys here also coached me to use additional supports beyond the infeed and outfeed when handling longer boards - without such helpers, you may find yourself really pushing down so hard to keep the piece from tipping off either side of the table... but as Jim mentioned, the goal is to really let the tool do the work, not brute force.

    All this from a relative novice, but just trying to pass along advice the SCM folks gave me that I have found particularly helpful.
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  8. #8
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    I wouldn’t wear gloves in any way shape or form, wadded up fabric is not something I want catching on a machine. I saw photos of a person whose shirt caught in a lathe (He did not survive, and the result was horrifying) and I have worn either tight cuffs or rolled sleeves everyday in the shop since then.

    WRT I use push blocks with medium to small stock. Never joint anything smaller than the manufacturer recommends.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  9. #9
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    I like Patrickís instructional video for jointers.https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ob3V5S...ndex=14&t=420s
    Pay attention to how he sets the outfeed table to knives Top dead center.
    A very accurate technique thatís not talked about very much and one I invented.
    Dont be a scaredy-cat
    Good Luck
    Aj

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    I wouldn’t wear gloves in any way shape or form, wadded up fabric is not something I want catching on a machine. I saw photos of a person whose shirt caught in a lathe (He did not survive, and the result was horrifying) and I have worn either tight cuffs or rolled sleeves everyday in the shop since then.

    WRT I use push blocks with medium to small stock. Never joint anything smaller than the manufacturer recommends.
    I have seen graphic video of a lathe operator, catching a sleeve, and he survived. But even with survival, it too was horrifying! Not to be replicated with this child. No loose sleeves here. It is also a lesson in why the automation systems I build put ALL devices in Manual at start-up (i.e. coming out of a shutdown or power fail). No surprise 're-starts'; it means the operator ALWAYS must take some action before any moving equipment will resume movement - no matter if its a 1/4" dump valve or a 400Hp pump ...something for the electrical DIYers to keep in mind when performing re-hab on that new-old saw starter circuit?

    These types of 'pull-in' accidents are fortunately rare. The number one cause of lost time accidents in my industry is hand injuries, mostly involving pinches, crushing, or tools slipping. Based on this, about 1 yr ago our Safety folks decreed impact-resistant gloves are mandatory. I am very much in Brian's camp on this - - even questioning the edict up thru management - - but have complied. We are allowed to remove them for 'dexterous' task requirements, so off they come for me to look at an instrument's wiring. And I leave the 400Hp pump couplings to the mechanics! ...Lost time accident rates are down.

    But in spite of the reduced accidents, in my shop, I too use push blocks. Period.

    I have openly joked that I can skin a knuckle just picking my nose. The sore spots are reminders to sharpen tools, secure the work properly, avoid excessive repetitive motion, or just slow down. But still no gloves.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    So Cal
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    Iíve had wear gloves when wood on my jointer several times. I had a cart full of Rough sawn vertical grain Douglas fir kiln dried. After handling the wood for a couple days I infected splinters in both hands. These are not ordinary splinters the fir is very hard to see because of the color of the wood is very close to skin color.
    Western red cedar splinters are so painful they get pulled on the spot.
    Itís ok to wear gloves for wood that splinters go septic
    I like push blocks too but not the plastic ones.
    I use shop made wood ones.
    Aj

  12. #12
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    May 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Shankar View Post
    For what it's worth, there's safety, which is absolutely #1, and then there is the result. Which, when I started with jointers (and even now from time to time) can drive you nuts no matter how many videos you watch. I'd get a bunch of 2x6 lumber, a good straightedge and square, and get to work.
    That's actually what I've started doing. I'm finding I am getting about .004 concave in the center of my boards though and am also trying to figure that out. It is totally driving me nuts.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malcolm McLeod View Post
    I have seen graphic video of a lathe operator, catching a sleeve, and he survived. But even with survival, it too was horrifying! Not to be replicated with this child. No loose sleeves here. It is also a lesson in why the automation systems I build put ALL devices in Manual at start-up (i.e. coming out of a shutdown or power fail). No surprise 're-starts'; it means the operator ALWAYS must take some action before any moving equipment will resume movement - no matter if its a 1/4" dump valve or a 400Hp pump ...something for the electrical DIYers to keep in mind when performing re-hab on that new-old saw starter circuit?

    These types of 'pull-in' accidents are fortunately rare. The number one cause of lost time accidents in my industry is hand injuries, mostly involving pinches, crushing, or tools slipping. Based on this, about 1 yr ago our Safety folks decreed impact-resistant gloves are mandatory. I am very much in Brian's camp on this - - even questioning the edict up thru management - - but have complied. We are allowed to remove them for 'dexterous' task requirements, so off they come for me to look at an instrument's wiring. And I leave the 400Hp pump couplings to the mechanics! ...Lost time accident rates are down.

    But in spite of the reduced accidents, in my shop, I too use push blocks. Period.

    I have openly joked that I can skin a knuckle just picking my nose. The sore spots are reminders to sharpen tools, secure the work properly, avoid excessive repetitive motion, or just slow down. But still no gloves.
    Do you use push blocks for every type of pass? I see some people have made some pretty nice ones that seem jointer specific.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2020
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    Redwood City, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Hughes View Post
    I like Patrick’s instructional video for jointers.https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ob3V5S...ndex=14&t=420s
    Pay attention to how he sets the outfeed table to knives Top dead center.
    A very accurate technique that’s not talked about very much and one I invented.
    Dont be a scaredy-cat
    Good Luck
    Great video thanks for the tip. Incidentally I set my outfeed table height using your method from another video I had watched. Worked far better than me fiddling with measuring how much the ruler was moving.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Redwood City, CA
    Posts
    59
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Riefer View Post
    After reading some old posts here recently, I bought a pair of coarse red rubber floats (typically used for plaster finishing) as my push tools. I've been very happy with how well they grip material, they offer nice control, and the price was very reasonable.

    One such option: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


    The guys here also coached me to use additional supports beyond the infeed and outfeed when handling longer boards - without such helpers, you may find yourself really pushing down so hard to keep the piece from tipping off either side of the table... but as Jim mentioned, the goal is to really let the tool do the work, not brute force.

    All this from a relative novice, but just trying to pass along advice the SCM folks gave me that I have found particularly helpful.
    Thank you, those push tools are far more reasonable that the woodworking specific stuff. I'll give something like those a go. I'm not liking the foam ones that it came with.

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