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Thread: Amish moving a barn

  1. #1
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    Amish moving a barn

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZL7TqSeDus
    The barn is in great shape and well worth moving. No idea why it is being moved but I see there is a buried pipeline in the area maybe they needed to dig under the barn.
    Bill D

    The German Brethern who live here drive cars and have cell phones.

  2. #2
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    Wee bit o' teamwork there...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    Great comments too!

  4. #4
    Impressive.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

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  5. #5
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    Had some friends who sold their place to an Amish family. The Amish family wanted a Morton building on the other side of the road. They just put poles under the building, picked it up, down the lane, and put it on the other side of the road. Quite a sight.
    John

  6. #6
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    I thought it was interesting the leader kept saying slow, slow. I would have thought he would have been telling them they could go a little faster. Tortuse and the hare I suppose. I bet that was not his first rodeo.
    I have read an average house weighs 10-20 tons. Easier to move a barn no power or sewer lines. I assume they added temporary horizontal beams near the bottom to grab onto. I bet the women made a big lunch for after the move. Probably better then the standard pizza if you help me move deal.
    Bill D
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 05-31-2020 at 6:19 PM.

  7. #7
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    Rushing risked multiple folks tripping, so the leader was probably trying to insure that the pace presented the least risk for injury. I'm sure that the post-move meal was...impressive...and very justified!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
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    Pretty cool. Rough calc: 22 x 35 is 770 guys in there. amazing. Uphill. Downhill. Spin it to the left.
    If it wasn't for the "last minute", nothing would ever get done.

  9. #9
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    Cool video, certainly wouldn’t have been possible with a pole barn.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Kelly View Post
    Cool video, certainly wouldn’t have been possible with a pole barn.
    that is a pole barn

  11. #11
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    Yup...pole barn with the poles cut off at the ground. That means it has to be fastened to the ground in the new location but that's certainly doable in a number of ways.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
    In my house, this feat would have soon been followed by "actually, I think it looked better in the first spot."

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by pete costa View Post
    in my house, this feat would have soon been followed by "actually, i think it looked better in the first spot."
    roflol!!!!!!!!!!!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
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    So anyone know what the the correlation from horse power to "Amish power" is ? There is definitely a lot of guys in there helping.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    I thought it was interesting the leader kept saying slow, slow. I would have thought he would have been telling them they could go a little faster. Tortuse and the hare I suppose. I bet that was not his first rodeo.
    I have read an average house weighs 10-20 tons. Easier to move a barn no power or sewer lines. I assume they added temporary horizontal beams near the bottom to grab onto. I bet the women made a big lunch for after the move. Probably better then the standard pizza if you help me move deal.
    Bill D
    When we moved our house (actually a disused one room school house), the 24' X 32' one story frame sitting on beams, gutted, weighed 26,000 lbs. It was easy to get that weight, because the thing was sitting on 4 hydraulic jacks of known specs, so going from the static pressure in the hydraulic reservoir to weight was a simple calculation : psi / sq in of ram - lbs of house. So I'd guess the "average" american house, is a bit North of 20 tons, given the small size of our cottage and the fact that it was gutted.

    The pole barn is a whole different construction, but it's not terribly heavy. I reckon that one is probably 48' X 36' or there abouts with 10' sidewalls. So, roughly 40 square of steel. If it's the typical 26 gauge steel of commodity pole barns, that's 75 lbs/square, or 3000 lbs total. It'll have 6" X 6" posts, and a lot of pine 2" lumber for trusses and rafters. It's an old building, so the lumber'll be dry. Rough calculation would say on the order of 3600 bd ft of lumber would cover the wood requirements, so maybe 12,000lbs there. In other words, the building probably weighs less than 15,000 lbs. 250 men could lift it without breaking a sweat. Stick with the younger Amish - who are accustomed to a lot of physical labor - and you wouldn't need even that many.

    But very impressive teamwork, nonetheless - which will surprise none of us who live around and see the Amish regularly. They are very good at that sort of thing.

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