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Thread: Cleaning 'waxed' turning blanks

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    9,619
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Just be sure to mill them proud of final and let them acclimate after slicing and dicing so moisture equalized. Thin stickers are needed for this. Moving air is nice, too.
    I think it he was going to make bandsaw boxes cut out of single solid blocks, sectioning and gluing to get an outside shell with a back and an inner hollow drawer or two. If well done (or lucky) it's difficult to see the glue lines and for the uninitiated to imagine how they are made.
    https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entri...wn-bandsaw-box

    Mark, depending on where you live and your environment 12% is a reasonable number for air-dried wood. In my air conditioned/heated shop blocks get a little drier but not much. (I don't heat or cool to typical urban american standards.) I would also consider them ready for use. Fortunately the width of the bandsaw blade kerf always seems to provide a little extra clearance.

    JKJ

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,952
    That makes sense, John. I didn't have the connection to bandsawn boxes when I made my comment.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Grand Island, Ne.
    Posts
    234
    The "wax coated wood" brings back bad memories for me. Several years ago, a very inexperienced ME bought a turned wood carvers mallet on a whim. Nice mallet, heavy, balanced. But the waxy surface bothered me and not thinking (knowing) I scraped all the wax off. Couldn't figure out what that was for LOL. In a couple weeks I found out...that thing split all over the place! Man, that must have been wet when it was turned!!

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Houston, Texas area
    Posts
    1,078
    John was correct in my approach. Basically you cut pieces off the block and glue them back together. The end result appears to be carved out of a solid block, minus the kerfs.

    Thanks everyone as always for the help. I shall install my Diemaster 1/4" blade today and start cutting, unless the wife gives me other projects. I bought the 1/4" blade 3 years ago when I set up the shop and it has never been installed. Only the resaw blade has been used.
    Mark McFarlane

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