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Thread: New dovetail saw recommendations

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Edwardsville, IL.
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    The Grammercy mentioned has a hang angle of approx. 45*, The Lie Nielsen approx. 40*, Bad Axe approx. 30* The higher the hang angle the more aggressive the saw will be, given the same pitch, rake and fleam ( Fleam should be 0 ). Mine are 45*, 38*, and 32*. Depends on what mood I am in. The vintage saws vary quite a bit as well. If you get the opportunity, try different saws to get a better feel for what works for you. Happy hunting.

  2. #17
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    central tx
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    Well I ended up getting an NE plus ultra from Pete Taran. Looking forward to giving it a spin in the near future. I'll post back with some pics.

  3. #18
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    Thanks Derek - I aspire to be an advanced dovetailer so hopefully I'll grow into it! I've been focused on the "light touch" in my sawing lately.


    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Thomas, ideally you want to try the saws out to decide if they are comfortable in the hand and cut the way you like.

    The teeth of the Veritas are distinctive for having a 14 degree rake. This makes the saw cut less aggressively, but smoothly. Most other dovetail saws are filed more aggressively, with rake around the 5-6 degree range, and I recall my LN came with zero degree rake. This makes the LN very fast cutting but more tricky to start. The Veritas is a terrific saw to begin with, and may be better suited to thinner boards. I prefer using the LN. partly because it is better for very hard woods, and I have had enough years to learn to use a light touch when starting a cut. I like the LN. Compared with saws below, it has a thicker handle, and will suit a larger hand.

    These comments are simply to illustrate that there will be differences among saws out if the box. In reality, if you sharpen you own saws, after a couple of years, what you are left with is a handle and saw plate. The teeth may or may not be the same rake, but what remains is the way the saw feels in the hand. Having said this, one should not be afraid to modify a handle - for example, on many I have found the bump on the grip to be too high, and take it down.

    Some if the very best handles were made by Wenzloff. One of my go-to saws is an IT, which is the fore runner if LN. It has a slimmer handle compared with the LN. It requires a lighter touch. Today these original maker if these saws has started making saws again - Pete Taran. Consider him the father of the modern dovetail saw. The other saw I would look at is the Gramercy. Another go-to for me. It is a more advanced design with a higher aspect angle and also a thin handle that demands a light touch. These are saws for more advanced dovetailers.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Crawford View Post
    Well I ended up getting an NE plus ultra from Pete Taran. Looking forward to giving it a spin in the near future. I'll post back with some pics.
    Surely it isn't just me looking forward to seeing some images of your new saw when you give it a test drive.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #20
    Thomas: Excellent choice. I am quite happy with my NE Plus Ultra and I would be very surprised if you were not equally impressed. Phil

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Crawford View Post
    Well I ended up getting an NE plus ultra from Pete Taran. Looking forward to giving it a spin in the near future. I'll post back with some pics.

  6. #21
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    Just dropped 2 of my dovetail saws off at the sharpening service...will have them back home in about a week...

  7. #22
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    Jan 2007
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    Michiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Hmmmm..I size my saws to the work being done....
    Attachment 434041
    So, IF the wood is 3/16" thick...YMMV

    ( need to take the No. 68 out to be sharpened...)
    Attachment 434042
    What I use for 3/4" stock.....Disston No.4, 9ppi, 14" long, filed rip.
    Attachment 434043
    And, the 68 that needs sharpened....
    Good point Steven. I was doing some small Dovetails on 1/4" Alder this past weekend and even with the wood doubled up the LN Dovetail was too much saw. I switched to a Gents style razor saw and it worked so much better.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio, USA
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    Lee Valley saws are probably the best value and I love mine.

    My Bad Axe saw is the easiest to start in a cut, so it is probably not the fastest to cut.

    Ron Botz makes great saws. Just saying.

    Lie Nielsen was my first dovetail saw; great saw.

    If possible, try them in your hand to see how they feel, it really makes a huge difference.

  9. #24
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    Just dropped of both my Disston No. 4 and the Disston No. 68 at the Sharpening Service, today. Will get them back home in about a week.....normal charge is around $10....

  10. #25
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    Mar 2009
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    central tx
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    I'm starting to collect other saws that need sharpening, I really need to dig in and get decent at it myself. I sharpened one for my Stanley 150 mitre box and it cuts well but could be better. I think I'm missing how to really set the rake, staying with a consistent fleam wasn't as hard.

  11. #26
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    The rake is set by how the file is held. Visit vintagesaws.com and read the primer on saw sharpening in the library section. It shows how to make a block for the far end of the file to help in holding it consistently while filing the teeth.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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