Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: Hinges For Inset Cabinet Doors

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    11

    Hinges For Inset Cabinet Doors

    I recently built a set of medicine cabinets that have inset doors. Obviously, inset doors aren't very forgiving as the gap around all for sides needs to be pretty close to perfect. On previous projects I have used traditional hinges, which were a pain to get everything lined up just right, but once it was everything just worked. On this project I used euro style hinges, which are nice because they offer adjustment in all directions, but they also seem to have quite a bit of play in them. Basically I can grab the door from the edge and with light pushing and pulling I'm able to make the hinge mechanisms move around a little bit. This results in the door sagging a little bit when closed and throwing the spacing off between the door and the face frame. All the adjustment screws are tightened down as much as possible.

    So that leads to my question, is this normal? If not does anyone have recommendations of euro style hinges that are really solid without any play?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,155
    Your hinges may have a bit of play in them, but I don't see why it is a problem. You close the door, observe where it sits, and tweak it until you get the gaps right. Because of the hinge play, you may be able to rattle the door up and down, but that doesn't happen to the door in usual use. Gravity works, all the time.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Dawson Creek, BC
    Posts
    958
    You could try Sugastune, but I doubt they will be much better. You need to look at the little knuckle that needs to tuck into the cup when the door closes. The size constraints make it difficult to fix the problem you are talking about, and even the smallest of doors gives you a whole lot of leverage. Sugastune makes a nice concealed hinge that is adjustable, but it is a bit hard on the pocket book.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    144
    Hi Mark,

    I always use Blum euro hinges for inset doors. I've had good luck with them being solid and haven't noticed the play you noted. Once I get them adjusted, they seem to stay dialed in and very solid.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    11
    Jamie,

    Sure, that's what I'm trying to do. Kind of tedious but should work for these doors. I think my question was really for the future. What hinge options are out there that are more precise.

    Brad,

    I'll take a look at the Sugastune concealed hinges. All my projects are for my own home and the number of hinges I need is fairly small, so don't mind paying for a more expensive hinge if the result is a very solid feeling door.

  6. #6
    Knife hinges work well for inset doors and are solid if you get a quality hinge (brusso, or lee valley, for example.) They are, however, a pain to install and have zero adjustability. And I wouldn't use them on big heavy doors.
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,155
    Mark, you say "All the adjustment screws are tightened down as much as possible." That doesn't sound right. There are two kinds of screws on Euro hinges: fastening, and adjustment. The fastening screws fasten the hinge to the cabinet. They should be tightened down. The adjustment screws adjust the door's position. They should not be tightened. They should be set to where the door is right. If you have adjustment screws tightened fully, that means they're at the end of their adjustment range. That's a different problem from play in the hinge.

    (Okay, there is an exception my characterization of fastening/adjustment. In the olden days, the screws which set the up/down position of the door were both adjustment and fastening. But I haven't seen that kind of hinge in decades. And the screws which adjust the door angle have always been just adjustment.)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Northern Michigan
    Posts
    4,785
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Kanof View Post
    Jamie,

    Sure, that's what I'm trying to do. Kind of tedious but should work for these doors. I think my question was really for the future. What hinge options are out there that are more precise.

    Brad,

    I'll take a look at the Sugastune concealed hinges. All my projects are for my own home and the number of hinges I need is fairly small, so don't mind paying for a more expensive hinge if the result is a very solid feeling door.

    Allow yourself a touch more room from your door edge to the cup boring. If you need to gain more space away from the frame you can always shim out the base if you run out of adjustment that way, but you can not make the door go back farther than it will allow without doing something ugly. Know what I mean?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    743
    What brand and model of hinges?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    507
    Inset is no place to skimp on quality.


    Sounds like you need a better hinge. Blum has been mentioned and is top shelf. Salice is too. These are probably the most widely distributed in the States. Grass and Hettich also make quality hinges, but aren't as easy to find.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    fayetteville Arkansas
    Posts
    568
    Yep, Blum is the way to go, save yourself headaches. I built all my kitchen and bath cabinets with insert doors on Blum hinges. No slop, sagging or unwanted movement.

  12. #12
    Blum is the industry standard and my choice. Download the catalog and learn how to read the set up charts.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Edgerton View Post
    Allow yourself a touch more room from your door edge to the cup boring. If you need to gain more space away from the frame you can always shim out the base if you run out of adjustment that way, but you can not make the door go back farther than it will allow without doing something ugly. Know what I mean?
    Yes, I know what you mean, great idea. I'll give this a try next time I do this type of door.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    Inset is no place to skimp on quality.


    Sounds like you need a better hinge. Blum has been mentioned and is top shelf. Salice is too. These are probably the most widely distributed in the States. Grass and Hettich also make quality hinges, but aren't as easy to find.
    Agreed on not skimping on quality. I also had some depth restrictions in this application, so I was limited in what I could find that would fit. Given that Blum makes so many hinges, they may have something that would have worked for me, but I could not find it at the time.

  15. #15
    id start with design, cabinets depending on style had hinges that are seen.

    On the Euro they are not as tight as butt hinges will be. Same with slides. I have lots of years meeting someone new and then adjusting their kitchen doors with my swiss army knife. Why? Last one two doors would not even close. Ive had hinge companies tell me which hinge and base plate only to find they dont work even supplying a drawing. Last time one of them gave me tons of hinges and base plates for me to find what works. Ive had euro hinges fail and last show was told they redesigned them. I dont like door gaps that you can pass a sandwich through and inset doors are supposed to be recessed slightly whether beaded frames or not. Soon as you do that and dont have big gaps it all gets harder to have swing clearance.

    Even if you use butt hinges your middle door gap canl still change with the seasons depending on where it sits if all styles shrink a bit in winter with the furnace thats where it shows up then goes back in the summer depending.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •