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Thread: Wiring Grizzly 1029 for 220v - wiring does not match manual

  1. #1

    Wiring Grizzly 1029 for 220v - wiring does not match manual

    I bought a barely used 1993 vintage Grizzly 1029 DC (6" dust port, 6" to two 4" Y connector) from a friend. The plug is 110v, and works that way but draws a lot of current. I want to convert to 220v because I have an available 220v circuit right next to the DC and the DC is on the same 110v circuit as the table saw (pops the 20A breaker when under load). The Grizzly manual shows 4 wires coming from the motor to the wiring block, but the DC has only two wires coming out of the motor housing, both yellow! The power cable from the wiring junction to the switch and the power cord both have red, black, and green wires. The red and black wires are each connected to one of the yellow wires.

    What do I do now? Any advice is appreciated.

    DC 1029 junction_resized.jpgDC 1029 wires from motor_resized.jpg

  2. #2
    It would appear that your motor is only able to run on 120 volts. Normally on a multiple voltage motor there would be several wires inside the junction box and a diagram showing how to switch voltage.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

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  3. #3
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    Like Lee said, with only two wires in the junction box it's unlikely that you can change the voltage. Is there a nameplate on the motor? If so, what does it say? A pic would be good.
    Beranek's Law:

    It has been remarked that if one selects his own components, builds his own enclosure, and is convinced he has made a wise choice of design, then his own loudspeaker sounds better to him than does anyone else's loudspeaker. In this case, the frequency response of the loudspeaker seems to play only a minor part in forming a person's opinion.
    L.L. Beranek, Acoustics (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1954), p.208.

  4. #4
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    Welcome.

    What does motor nameplate show? Any chance of getting a pic?
    (As Capt Schierer says, it is possible it’s 120V-only.)
    Molann an obair an saor.

    If Heaven ain't alot like Texas, I don't wanna go. - Hank Jr.

  5. #5
    Sorry, should have included that. Here it is.
    It does say 220v, 10 amp.


    DC 1029 motor nameplate.jpg

  6. #6
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    From the motor plate, it seems like the device is 220 only. That it runs when plugged into 110 is surprising. I'd replace the 110 plug with one that plugs into your 220 outlet, and see if that runs correctly.

  7. #7
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    You might also quiz the friend you bought it from. Why did he have a 110 plug on it? Was he running it on 110? If he was running it on 110, why was he doing that when the motor plate says it is a 220 machine?

  8. #8
    https://www.quora.com/What-happens-w...tor-on-110v-AC

    Per the nameplate it should run great at 220, but you might just blow it up

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    The Grizzly web site lists the G1029 as discontinued, but says it is a 220 volt machine. https://www.grizzly.com/products/Gri...ollector/G1029

  10. #10
    Replacing the plug was my thought, too. I bought one today, just in case. On this forum I read that running 220 on a DC wired for 110 was a no-no, but did not find anything about the other way around. The manual says the DC comes wired for 220 but without a plug, so it wouldn't surprise me if he just wired a 110 plug. He probably never even used the DC. I bought his whole Grizzly setup and the planer and DC look new. The jointer was probably the only thing he used. He's very old now but maybe I'll talk to his son the next time I see him. With the lockdown here in CA it might be awhile. I'm in one of the 7 Bay Area counties whose restrictions are more strict than CA state rules.

    Anyway, thanks all for your help. I feel better now about replacing the plug.
    My first post! Great site!

  11. #11
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    When we moved into our house there were a few 220 v circuits that had 110 v receptacles on them. Cheaper and easier to find than the appropriate recep/plug for some DIY folks. All good until somebody besides the "installer" uses them for something!! Passed the home inspection--but i had them replaced the week we moved in.

    earl

  12. #12
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    Perhaps the previous owner installed the incorrect cord cap (plug) on the power cord from the dust collector. If the mating receptacle was also incorrectly wired (ie. 120 wired for 220) then that would explain the discrepancy.
    David

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Earl McLain View Post
    When we moved into our house there were a few 220 v circuits that had 110 v receptacles on them. Cheaper and easier to find than the appropriate recep/plug for some DIY folks. All good until somebody besides the "installer" uses them for something!! Passed the home inspection--but i had them replaced the week we moved in.

    earl
    I've seen people to this to use pre-made extension cords before.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Krausnick View Post
    I bought a barely used 1993 vintage Grizzly 1029 DC (6" dust port, 6" to two 4" Y connector) from a friend. The plug is 110v, and works that way but draws a lot of current. I want to convert to 220v because I have an available 220v circuit right next to the DC and the DC is on the same 110v circuit as the table saw (pops the 20A breaker when under load). The Grizzly manual shows 4 wires coming from the motor to the wiring block, but the DC has only two wires coming out of the motor housing, both yellow! The power cable from the wiring junction to the switch and the power cord both have red, black, and green wires. The red and black wires are each connected to one of the yellow wires.

    What do I do now? Any advice is appreciated.

    DC 1029 junction_resized.jpgDC 1029 wires from motor_resized.jpg
    No white wire? For 110 operation, you should have a green, colored ( either red, or black,) and a white. A few years back, I bought a Delta 12" center pivot RAS from state surplus. Tag said "motor bad." Label on motor said 220 volts only, but saw had a 15 amp, 110 volt plug on it. Put correct plug on saw, and magically the motor was no longer bad.

  15. #15
    Just thought I'd close the loop on this. I replaced the 110v plug with the plug that corresponds to my 220v outlet, plugged in, and turned it on for a few seconds. No smoke. So I used it for about 30 minutes while connected to the table saw. No problems, so replacing the plug allows 220v operation. Thanks for all your help.

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