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Thread: Restoring Flood Damaged Equipment

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    Cambridge Vermont
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    In this case I think the state is going to have to pony up. It could take some time but there's lots of actors in this that didn't do the right thing. The company that owned the dam is most likely not going to be able to afford the damage. But from what I understand the company was sued by the state when they lowered the water level to mitigate the risk and were forced to raise it back up. Usually when something is declared a federal disaster there's money available. Hopefully it works out for him.

  2. #17
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    Mar 2003
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    52,968
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    Wow. So whole towns and cities will have to be abandoned because of this. Welcome to the future, sadly.
    It's pretty much always been this way. Read your homeowner's policy...it's very likely that there's specific language that precludes flood damage. This is why folks who have homes within the 100 year flood pattern have to cover separate flood insurance to get loans. In the case of a major flood like this, Federal and State disaster relief helps to cover the cost of rebuilding and loss for businesses and homeowners. There may be other factors in this particular situation because the flood is the result of dam failures.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    It's pretty much always been this way. Read your homeowner's policy...it's very likely that there's specific language that precludes flood damage. This is why folks who have homes within the 100 year flood pattern have to cover separate flood insurance to get loans. In the case of a major flood like this, Federal and State disaster relief helps to cover the cost of rebuilding and loss for businesses and homeowners. There may be other factors in this particular situation because the flood is the result of dam failures.
    Dams owned by a for profit corporation. This could take a decade before any cash flows.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
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    278
    I was watching James Hamilton’s YouTube blog yesterday about the dam breaking and the resulting issues.
    He said the dams were privately owned, and were unprofitable anyway, therefore no prospect of rebuilding. My assessment is that the dam owner’s insurance company could be on the hook, but you know insurance companies.
    Young enough to remember doing it;
    Old enough to wish I could do it again.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
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    763
    Not that I want to turn this into a debate over the dam but in 2018 the state took over oversight of the dam when the operator lost their federal license to generate electricity for not adding an additional 4 spill ways (they wanted to add only 2). The state then sued the dam owner for lowering the water level saying that millions of fresh water mussels were killed. After loosing the private company was forced to return the level back to it's original unsafe level. With the amount of money lost something would have to pass in congress to proved federal relief money for those who suffered a loss. I have no clue what insurance the private company had but they will most likely realize it's going to reach the max and counter sue the state. Meanwhile the company is most likely going to file for bankruptcy. I'm not sure even if Michigan has the funds to cover this.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    135
    Folks, I'd prefer that this post didn't turn into a discussion of the politics surrounding the situation. I would be happy to hear more suggestions for restoring flood damaged equipment though.

    Thanks,
    Davre
    Last edited by Dave Bunge; 05-29-2020 at 2:17 PM.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    135

    Removing Rust

    Any advice on removing rust? I found a thread from 10 years ago https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....ove-rust/page4

    Soaking or scrubbing with Bar Keepers Friend or Evaporust seemed to be pretty popular. Is there anything new on the scene since then?

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    4,332
    Evaporust is mostly EDTA in water. EDTA in water soaking will chelate rust pretty well. Evaporust has stuff in it to keep the PH at the best levels but EDTA is cheap. It will neutralize about one pound of rust for one pound of EDTA. I just make a glacial solurion and soak stuff in it. Best to fully submerge the stuff for there is risk of etching water lines. I buy my EDTA from ebay as a powder.
    It is safe enough that people eat it to clean out there system?
    Bil lD

    I think this is evaporust:

    https://patents.google.com/patent/US20040102344

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
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    1,976
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Bunge View Post
    Any advice on removing rust? I found a thread from 10 years ago https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....ove-rust/page4

    Soaking or scrubbing with Bar Keepers Friend or Evaporust seemed to be pretty popular. Is there anything new on the scene since then?
    Search YouTube for rust removers. There's tons of content on comparing rust removal methods.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Peoria, IL
    Posts
    1,727
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Bunge View Post
    Any advice on removing rust? I found a thread from 10 years ago https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....ove-rust/page4

    Soaking or scrubbing with Bar Keepers Friend or Evaporust seemed to be pretty popular. Is there anything new on the scene since then?

    For removing rust off tables, I prefer to start with a single edge razor blade in a scraper handle. Does a great job getting off the thick stuff and your choice after that.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Porter,TX
    Posts
    1,279
    Guessing he is having to focus on his basement and getting it back into shape before he has power turned back on? But to the machines I would start by drying and coating the cast iron surface,pull the motors then take the plate off where wires are and rotate them to drain out the water. If possible if he could put them in room that is dry with a humidifier sure would be big help in getting them dry. But flash rust is for certain.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    763
    If the rust is pretty heavy I would use a 4 1/2" grinder with a wire cup wheel. Wear eye protection and a mask. It'll remove most of the rust quickly but it will be dusty so do it outside. For the final step on the flat surfaces I like to use a little oil and some silicon carbide snadpaper with a block. Like sanding wood just keep going up to finer grits until it looks as smooth as you would like.

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