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Thread: Card scraper hook - how long does it last?

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bill epstein View Post
    Neanderthal? Really?
    If you need to angle the card more than a few degrees off 90 you applied too coarse a burr. Start over.

    Or buy yourself a $1000 imported belt sander and forget the whole thing.
    Simple tools should not be fiddly. I've seen too many otherwise capable woodworkers flummoxed by the card scraper to think otherwise.

    In a recent video from Christian Beeksvort he uses an ancient belt sander, to illustrate your point.

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by bill epstein View Post
    Neanderthal? Really?



    When the scraper fails to yield nice shavings, simply lay it flat on the bench and pass the burnisher, also flat, over it a few times which will remove any remaining burr making the "tick-tick" sound that's characteristic and re-apply the burnisher to the edge. Just like a plane blade, it isn't necessary to go back to the file and stone for quite awhile.
    I agree with this, although I confess it took me a while to realize it. Just today, I did exactly what Bill is describing with a scraper that once upon a time, I would have gone back to file and stone. Within a couple of minutes, the burr came back like new, producing the shavings you see below.
    The only place I would disagree is anyone suggesting going straight from a file to turning a burr. I feel you get a better, sharper burr if you refine the edge of the scraper with progressively finer stones at 90 degrees before drawing and turning the burr.

    If I were guessing, I would say the OP's issue may be tilting the burnisher too much. 1-3 degrees is barely any tilt at all. It is very easy to overdo it and then the hook is exaggerated and weak, and I think this is the most common beginner mistake.

    One other tip, protect your scraper edges just like any tool edge. I use these plastic presentation binders you can get at any office supply place.

    William Ng has a very good video on scraper edge prep, I follow what he demonstrates pretty much exactly. Yes, agree with the others that this is a humble and simple tool. Don't overthink it, and with very little practice, you'll develop a feel for it.


    image2.jpegimage1.jpegimage0.jpeg
    Last edited by Edwin Santos; 05-27-2020 at 7:24 PM.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bill epstein View Post
    ... lay it flat on the bench and pass the burnisher, also flat, over it a few times which will remove any remaining burr making the "tick-tick" sound that's characteristic and re-apply the burnisher to the edge. ...
    In a 1956 book on woodturning the author described "ticketing" the scrapers with a burnisher. Said the that term came from the sound.

    JKJ

  4. #19
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Learning to turn a burr on a scraper was an "ah-hah" moment for me. I've found that a drop of oil spread along the edge is absolutely necessary for a smooth burr. Also, once it dulls a bit, it can easily be brought back with a swipe or two.

    I just use my fine DMT stone after the file. I press hard on the flat face 4 or 5 times and not so much on the edge. It amazes me how many fluffy shavings you can get from four sides of a card scraper before its time to grab a fresh one.

    Check your burr quality by dragging your fingernail down the edge. You shouldn't feel any nicks at all.

    Also, don't worry so much about the angles. Just go for as slight as you can. You'll feel it getting fragile if you go too far.

    Also, in use, it takes a lot of pressure to hold the scraper just right and get a continuous shaving. If you go fast, it's going to get hot. Either wear some gloves or find some kind of insulator. I use a leather piece that matches the size of my scrapers.

    Dan

  5. #20
    Like you and others, I struggled with getting a card scraper to perform properly. Someone here at SMC suggested the video by Michael Pekovicho of Fine Woodworking. His technique worked so well for me I bookmarked it and review it each time I need to renew the edges on my scrapers. I was also amazed to learn how little pressure it takes to form the burr.
    Lee Schierer
    Captain USNR(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  6. #21
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    The important step to developing a STRONG hook is to avoid bending it too far and too fast.

    1. Draw the steel out to produce metal to turn.

    2. Now turn the hook in two moves: the first at 5 degrees, and the second at 10 degrees.

    Full article: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Woodwor...29Scraper.html


    About 5 light strokes from the left and 5 from the right with a thin carbide burnisher (compliments of Tony Z about 10 years ago. Thanks Tony!).






    Turn the hook at about 5 degrees. Do the 5 and 5 again ...




    This is another crucial omitted step - do it again but at closer to 10 degrees.




    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    The important step to developing a STRONG hook is to avoid bending it too far and too fast.

    1. Draw the steel out to produce metal to turn.

    2. Now turn the hook in two moves: the first at 5 degrees, and the second at 10 degrees.

    Full article: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Woodwor...29Scraper.html


    About 5 light strokes from the left and 5 from the right with a thin carbide burnisher (compliments of Tony Z about 10 years ago. Thanks Tony!).






    Turn the hook at about 5 degrees. Do the 5 and 5 again ...




    This is another crucial omitted step - do it again but at closer to 10 degrees.




    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    For the OP's benefit, it may be the angle of the camera distorting things, but the photos above imply way more burnisher tilt angle than optimal.
    An exaggerated angle will create an excessive burr which will be weaker. Another clue is that an excessive burnishing angle will cause you to have to hold the scraper at a more acute angle to the work in order to cut. What you're seeking is a scraper position not too far from upright.
    Lee mentioned the Michael Pekovich video, which illustrates a very subtle burnisher tilt, barely off 90 degrees. I recommend William Ng's video also, which will show the same tilt as Pekovich though he has a different style of hand held burnishing.

    Not a criticism of Derek by any means, like I say, it could be the angle of the camera and not that he's demonstrating poor technique. But for many beginners, too much angle is the bigger pitfall than too little, especially based on the OP's description of his issues which is why I point it out. The 5-10 degree description is sound, but my point is that it only takes a tilt just barely off 90 degrees to achieve it.
    Last edited by Edwin Santos; 05-29-2020 at 4:31 PM.

  8. #23
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    I often talk about my mentor. I think about what he taught every time I do certain things. He would always say when dealing with angles think about a clock. “Lay the clock on its side with 12 o’clock at the end of your burnisher. Push the burnisher down to 1 minute after twelve, never past 2 minutes after, push down with your thumb like your sticking down a stamp. Two times, no more. I think that way every time I do it. Works for me. File and then stoned on a fine carborundum stone in those days.

  9. #24
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    Feb 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    For the OP's benefit, it may be the angle of the camera distorting things, but the photos above imply way more burnisher tilt angle than optimal.
    ....
    5 degrees and then 10 degrees is what I wrote. One can judge this by eye after a while. The photo is just a demo and angles are distorted by the lens. Don’t get hung up on this. Draw a couple of lines on a board and stand it next to you if you need.

    The point I was making is that one should not aim to do 10 degrees in one shot. Doing in two does not stress the metal firming the hook as much. That makes for a stronger hook.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

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