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Thread: Marking knives for joinery

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Missouri
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    1,657
    Here is mine. I have 2 mill knives one ground single bevel right and one left. The same for the exactoís. The rest are more or less in order of use. The mill knives are used the most. Not good of course for dovetails but for most things are great in arthritic hands. The knife on the right end is good for plastics but it cuts on both ends, usually me that gets cut.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Stone Mountain, GA
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    584
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt Putnam View Post
    Mostly, I can no longer see a fine knife line either so I use a few tricks.

    * - Derek's blue tape trick is very useful for defining where the line is
    * - Knife the line and before you remove the tape, rule, or square follow up with a 0.5 mm pencil
    * - When I need to hit a specific measure that I cannot gauge, I lay the square across a flat tape and then pencil, knife, or both

    High contrast is the key
    The angle of light matters too. Bright overhead lights sometimes make knife lines disappear. So I keep a camping headlamp in the shop. I can sit it on a surface and provide raking light over a critical knife mark, making them very easy to see.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,270
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Seeing a knifed line can be difficult even for young eyes.

    A carpenters pencil with the flat edge cut to a chisel point on fine sandpaper can follow a knifed line quite well. Makes it a lot easier to see and it stays accurate.

    jtk
    Jim, no matter how careful you are with a pencil, the line will inevitably be thicker than a knifed line. One can work to the edge of a line, but a knifed line can register a chisel or a knife edge when using a square to continue it.

    I have long wanted to know more about how Japanese woodworkers use a sumitsubo. A centre line is marked (rather than using a reference side) and then they work from each side of the line. But this inked line has thickness. How does this work?

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    1,707
    My selection is pretty simple. On top is a Veritas I got years ago. Itís pretty sturdy and works well on the White Oak I use often. In the middle is a Czeck edge I got at a LN tool event in Cincinnati a few years back. Itís my preferred choice for fine grained woods. On the bottom is a home brew I made from a scroll saw blade and a scrap of Brazilian Rosewood. Itís very thin and was intended for dovetails. It serves its purpose pretty well.


    49F3217D-8934-461D-ABAC-03D663D03C14.jpg
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    8,754
    X-acto knives..
    Block Plane Box #2, last side.JPG
    Rather than this Kobalt.....blades are too thick on the Kobalt....but..
    Dovetailed Plane Box, marking knife.JPG
    When the edge gets dull on this little knife, I can simply replace it with a brand new one.....packs of 5 are fairly cheap...small handle is about the same as holding a pencil.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    DuBois, PA
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    1,802
    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    X-acto knives..
    Block Plane Box #2, last side.JPG
    Rather than this Kobalt.....blades are too thick on the Kobalt....but..
    Dovetailed Plane Box, marking knife.JPG
    When the edge gets dull on this little knife, I can simply replace it with a brand new one.....packs of 5 are fairly cheap...small handle is about the same as holding a pencil.
    Similar to what Joel/Tools for Working Wood sells. I have several laying around (cheap) and they work well!
    If the thunder don't get you, the lightning will.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
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    21,414
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Seeing a knifed line can be difficult even for young eyes.

    A carpenters pencil with the flat edge cut to a chisel point on fine sandpaper can follow a knifed line quite well. Makes it a lot easier to see and it stays accurate.

    jtk
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Jim, no matter how careful you are with a pencil, the line will inevitably be thicker than a knifed line. One can work to the edge of a line, but a knifed line can register a chisel or a knife edge when using a square to continue it.

    I have long wanted to know more about how Japanese woodworkers use a sumitsubo. A centre line is marked (rather than using a reference side) and then they work from each side of the line. But this inked line has thickness. How does this work?

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Derek, you may have misunderstood my comment on using a pencil in the knifed line. Here is an example:

    Penciled Knife Lines.jpg

    The lines were first made with a knife. The one on the right was made with the saw blade marking knife. The other two were made with the plane blade marking knife using different pressure for a light line in the middle and a heave line on the left. The pencil is not a carpenter's pencil, it is an artist pencil, if my memory is working it is likely a 2B (soft) lead. It was sharpened to a chisel point before marking the bottom half of the lines. Normally a carpenter's pencil is used, but this one was on the bench.

    On dark wood, rubbing chalk into the line makes it stand out to be seen.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,270
    Jim, I use a 0.5mm pencil. The lines are fine, and remain so. The issue I have with thicker pencils is that they need to be sharpened all the time to keep the line fine. As I mentioned earlier, the advantage of a knifed line, in addition to being and staying fine, is that it has a defined registration point.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Missouri
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    1,657
    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    Jim, I use a 0.5mm pencil. The lines are fine, and remain so. The issue I have with thicker pencils is that they need to be sharpened all the time to keep the line fine. As I mentioned earlier, the advantage of a knifed line, in addition to being and staying fine, is that it has a defined registration point.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    Derek I agree with you on knifed lines. I was just expressing how some very accurate markings can be made with pencils. A discussion could be good. That is why I started another thread about sumitsubo use and centerline marking.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,270
    Jim, I saw that - thanks for the new thread

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    The old pueblo in el norte.
    Posts
    290
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Zaffuto View Post
    Nice grouping of knives and I'm also the proud owner and user of a "Cohen knife"!

    T
    Yep, me too. It's the thinnest, narrowest marking knife I own, so it gets the 'hard to reach' jobs.
    ~mike

    scope creep

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