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Thread: Saw advice

  1. #46
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    I have seen lights next to guys in videos or pictures when sharpening. I'll make sure I set one up.

  2. #47
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    Being able to see what you are doing is probably the most important part.
    My saw sharpening kit includes a few different wearable magnifiers. My intention is to hunt for and purchase one or two more in the future.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #48
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    Stew, great comments about what to look for in a vintage saw.

    I would also suggest looking for a straight saw plate. A slight bend over the length of the saw is no big deal, but a definite kink or bend is trouble. They can be straightened with hammer and anvil if you know what you're doing, but even then the kink will always be a weak spot more likely to kink in the future. Too many straight ones available to worry over the others.

  4. #49
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    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
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    IMAG0001.JPG
    Rehabbed D-8
    relatives.jpg
    Rehabbed D-100 and D-112
    shorty saw.jpg
    Panel saw in front, is a D(no hyphen)8, 10ppi, 20" panel saw....

  5. #50
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    Jan 2012
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    Austin, TX
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    I'm a bit late to the party... but FWIW I bought two vintage saws from Pete Taran, one rip, one cross cut, which have already seen much use. He resharpened them before sending. Price was way less than a modern premium like Bad-Axe. (I did purchase some Bad-Axe back saws, but it takes forever to get something from them due to lead times, these two saws arrived months sooner and I got a good bit of work done with them).

    I've much less used my table saw since... but when I'm staring at a rip of more than 3 or so feet... I usually drag out the tablesaw.
    My CMS is in serious risk of being sold. I've not made a crosscut by anything but hand in months.
    Last edited by Erich Weidner; 05-30-2020 at 12:34 AM.

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erich Weidner View Post

    I've much less used my table saw since... but when I'm staring at a rip of more than 3 or so feet... I usually drag out the tablesaw.
    My CMS is in serious risk of being sold. I've not made a crosscut by anything but hand in months.
    Welcome to the quiet side of woodworking.
    Less dust, too.

    If you square your stock on 4 sides and mark all the way around, a pair of bench hooks will make it easier. I prefer a dedicated Miter box for precision - but that can be a feature of a bench hook.


    http://www.badaxetoolworks.com/bad-a...-hook-sets.php

  7. #52
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    Feb 2016
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    Odessa, Tx
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    Ok guys, I know I can use a couple of pieces of wood and clamp the saw in the vise. Or use my small saw vise I used for my dovetail saw and move the big saw a couple times but I dont think the faces are very true to each other. It screeches when sharpening on a certain section of the vise, really annoying.

    Anyways, great excuse for a new project. A wooden saw vise. I figure I might as well go big enough for any saw, so I want something like what the guy from Wood by Wright made. Bottom clamps into bench vise so that top is at a comfortable level and twin screws to get an even tightness. I know there are different kinds but I like the look.

    Question: and this also goes for my regular bench vise too.

    I have a big roll of rawhide tooling leather. Fairly thick. Should I line my vises with it? Rough or smooth side out if yes.

  8. #53
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    Some saw vises have a groove under the top edge. This is for a piece of leather to dampen the screech. On my old one blue tape across the edge did the trick.

    My Gramercy saw vise seems to work well without it. Looks like there may not be any pictures of it on my computer. Did find this though:

    Wood Saw Vise 905.jpg

    Bob Smalser posted a tutorial on saw rehab which includes his shop made saw vise. It can be found in the archive >

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?103805

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #54
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    Feb 2016
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    Thanks Jim! I looked at my small vise and there are little plug spots. Looks like to hold something. 3 on on side 2 on the other.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #55
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    Sometimes, they used a couple strips of rubber hose. Make a slice lengthwise, and slip onto the jaws...( got any old, worn out rubber air hose?)

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Matthews View Post
    If you square your stock on 4 sides and mark all the way around, a pair of bench hooks will make it easier. I prefer a dedicated Miter box for precision - but that can be a feature of a bench hook
    Yes, I made a pair out of scrap Baltic birch plywood. Definitely improved my game.

  12. #57
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    One thing that seems to be helping to improve my sawing is to watch the reflection on the saw plate. For 90 cuts it should look like an extension of the piece being cut. Being off vertical makes the piece seem to bow up or down. Being off square makes the board look bent.

    It also reveals any unwanted movement during the stroke of the saw.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #58
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    Feb 2016
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    Odessa, Tx
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    Well I cleaned the saw I mentioned before. It cost 35 bucks but it looked cool, I know terrible reason to buy a saw, and the teeth was like 5 PPI and I needed a rip saw, all the others are crosscut.

    I soaked it in WD40 for a bit and following Vintagesaws advice I scraped and lightly sanded. I also only cleaned and oiled handle for now. I can make out some of the etching, the teeth are not rounded like a couple old saws I have hanging up and since they still look ok I think ill give sharpening a go!

    Oh and it says 5.5 in the corner.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #59
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    Feb 2016
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    Odessa, Tx
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    Ok, I'm getting ready to sharpen and I'm looking at all the teeth. I noticed the heel teeth and toe teeth looked just s bit different. So I measured them.

    Heel is 5 ppi, toe is 6 ppi. The middle falls in the 5.5 range.

    Is this normal?

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blake M Williams View Post
    Ok, I'm getting ready to sharpen and I'm looking at all the teeth. I noticed the heel teeth and toe teeth looked just s bit different. So I measured them.

    Heel is 5 ppi, toe is 6 ppi. The middle falls in the 5.5 range.

    Is this normal?
    Not on an old saw. Some might call it a progressive pitch sharpening. Some might change the pronunciation a little.

    Unless you want to do a lot of work or can send it out to have the teeth recut it might be easier to keep what you have.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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