Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 24 of 24

Thread: NJ Shop Build - Basement Under Shop

  1. #16
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    9
    Thank you again to everyone. Reading through these ideas is encouraging. In fact in addition to your suggestions, I also now now see the possibility for a potential bathroom, slop sink, and maybe use it as a spray area. Will allow the overall structure to be smaller with more utility.

    Ben, I am just starting the process - so no pictures yet. But will be happy to share as things progress.

    Sal

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,856
    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Cangialosi View Post
    Will allow the overall structure to be smaller with more utility.
    Um...never go smaller unless you're under duress/penalty of death...and even then, don't do it!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #18
    Agree with Jim. If anything make it 2' wider and 4' longer.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,856
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Andrew View Post
    Agree with Jim. If anything make it 2' wider and 4' longer.
    I wish I could find a shop-stretcher to do that...I coulda' had a bigger CNC. LOL
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #20
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    9
    Ok Got it... Just a momentary slip from sanity!
    Thanks,
    Sal

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    1,835
    You’ll want to factor in for finishing the basement walls with rigid foam insulation and drywall. Cool basement-level masonry walls will perspire in humid weather making it difficult to keep things dry w/o running a dehumidifier 24/7 in the warmer months. To that end, I’d make sure to install a sump basin and pump.

  7. #22
    As long as we are living vicariously with your build, the suggestions on a hatch through the floor are good, but take that same idea up one more story. I have an 8/12 pitch on my 30x34 shop. it allowed me to go with attic trusses that offer 7x8x30' of storage area upstairs. Not wanting to dedicate space for staircase I have a 350# folding AL ladder. Yes it is tight, but it works well. Roof structure is 24" oc and I cut a 48" baythat is in line with the large overhead door. I put a 1000# winch up top and made a platform for lifts. It is only for light storage and I keep that in mind, but if you don't make a spot for HER light storage she will "need" some of your space. Protect it at all costs, because once she gets a toe-hold it is the very definition of the Domino Theory. I keep all manner of "stuff" up there and bring it up and down as needed.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    9
    Good point, Peter. I hadn't consider that aspect. Particularly the need for a sump pump.

    All of these ideas will lead to a more successful result from the builder as they are less likely to be left out of the conversation.

    Hope this benefits others that are looking to build a shop now or in the future the way it is benefiting me

    Sal

  9. #24
    One thing no one has mentioned is the need to consider overengineering the shop floor if you build a basement under it. Most homes use 2x floor joists on 16" centers over basements and are designed for a 40# psf dead load (weight of the structure and furniture) and a 100# psf live load (people). Shops are an entirely different situation with potentially very heavy machine tools having small footprints. As an example, I lucked into a Crescent P24 surface planer several years ago - at 4,000+ pounds in a 3x4' footprint, i.e., 335# psf - I'd be reckless to put it on a floor not designed for such a load (it sits in my garage on a 6" concrete slab). A friend with a two level workshop had to install a pair of support columns and a carrying I beam for a heavy piece of machinery. Temporary columns/beams were used as the thing was moved into position. Of course, if you're a Neanderthal woodworker, or never intend to get anything heavier than a Craftsman tablesaw, there will be no problem. If you're like many of us, OTOH, you'll wish you had designed your shop with the possibility of ever heavier tool acquisition in mind.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •