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Thread: Byrd head for shaper

  1. #16
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Northern Virginia
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    743
    The amana head works reasonably well.
    IMG_20190109_183424_264.jpg

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    I use a router with a template and template guides all the time, but I've never heard of a bandsaw with a template and a follower. Sounds interesting. Care to publish a photo or two?
    Hey Jamie, Here are a few photos that I took of my process, sorry if the photos don't totally explain it (only photos I could find). I have since, improved my process a little bit by matching the follower (the home made fence clamped to the bandsaw) shape to the curve of the template. There was a good article by Brian Boggs in Fine Woodworking not too long ago. If you are interested, I could shoot some better photos next time I set it up. Similar principles apply as discussed above about making the template longer for lead in , lead out...The other thing that I have started to do is to have the template on the bottom, which is a little trickier, because you can't see the template/follower interface, but is easier because you can don't have to float the follower above the table and also allows me to do some more creative things with the templates.
    IMG_1415.jpgIMG_1416.jpgIMG_1418.jpg

  3. #18
    I have a 3 HP Grizzly shaper that I've used for similar work. Normally has a 3/4" spindle in it, but I also have a 1" spindle for it. When I was doing rockers, I first made my templates and had toggle clamps to hold the work piece down onto the template. As far as a cutterhead I've tried a 2" high conventional cutter with OK results most of the time. I've since gotten a 2" high spiral insert cutter head for it which I prefer. It's 4" o.d. with a 1 1/4" bore along with a 4" bearing. To use the cutter and bearing, I use a pair of T-bushings along with a Double T-bushing to fit between the cutter and bearing (I have 3/4" to 1 1/4" and 1" to 1 1/4" T-bushings and Double T-bushings) , I did mill one side of the double bushing down about maybe 1/8" so the double and T-bushing did not touch each other inside the bearing. With this setup I can use the cutter and bearing on either spindle in the shaper as sometimes it's a quick job and don't want to swap out the spindle.
    The templates I used are extended maybe 3" to 4" beyond the end of the work piece on both ends. Using a starter pin I'm able to pivot the template in the area before the work piece onto the bearing then move the template and work piece past the cutterhead to end beyond the piece to be shaped. Once the bottom arc is done, I use another template and shape the upper portion of the rocker. Been doing this for some time and it's worked out well. Happens I've gotten great results with the spiral insert cutterhead regardless of the grain in the pieces being shaped. The work pieces are trimmed to about 1/8" proud of the line to be shaped to, so it's not a massive cut though this spiral cutterhead seems to be able to hog off much more wood if desired though I don't do that.
    Hope that helps
    Last edited by Paul Haus; 05-18-2020 at 6:27 AM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    9,151
    Quote Originally Posted by scott lipscomb View Post
    Hey Jamie, Here are a few photos that I took of my process, sorry if the photos don't totally explain it (only photos I could find). I have since, improved my process a little bit by matching the follower (the home made fence clamped to the bandsaw) shape to the curve of the template. There was a good article by Brian Boggs in Fine Woodworking not too long ago. If you are interested, I could shoot some better photos next time I set it up. Similar principles apply as discussed above about making the template longer for lead in , lead out...The other thing that I have started to do is to have the template on the bottom, which is a little trickier, because you can't see the template/follower interface, but is easier because you can don't have to float the follower above the table and also allows me to do some more creative things with the templates.
    Thanks for trying, but I don't get it from those photos. I'll go look for the Boggs article.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
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    9,151
    Quote Originally Posted by scott lipscomb View Post
    Hey Jamie, Here are a few photos that I took of my process, sorry if the photos don't totally explain it (only photos I could find). I have since, improved my process a little bit by matching the follower (the home made fence clamped to the bandsaw) shape to the curve of the template. There was a good article by Brian Boggs in Fine Woodworking not too long ago. If you are interested, I could shoot some better photos next time I set it up. Similar principles apply as discussed above about making the template longer for lead in , lead out...The other thing that I have started to do is to have the template on the bottom, which is a little trickier, because you can't see the template/follower interface, but is easier because you can don't have to float the follower above the table and also allows me to do some more creative things with the templates.
    IMG_1415.jpgIMG_1416.jpgIMG_1418.jpg
    So.. in your first photo, the follower is that piece of baltic birch just in front of the blade. It touches the template, which is fastened to the top of the workpiece. The template and workpiece can be seen in the third photo. In both the first and third pix, there's wood below the follower. I *think* that's just offcuts.
    In the Boggs write-up (Nov/Dec 2018), it seems that he has fastened his follower to the blade guide, as contrasted to your approach, where it fastens to the table.

  6. #21
    Jamie, the guide finger is adjusted flush with the blade and works like a fixed guide collar on a shaper (without the offset). I have used a similar guide with a cutout around the blade so the template can bear on it both before and after the cut. I generally prefer the shaper because I can get a more precise result with less sanding, but there is no doubt the bandsaw setup is safer and gives decent results.

    https://www.finewoodworking.com/2008...complex-curves

    One thing that Joe Calhoon touched on relating to safety is that often a curved template can be run with the powerfeed. If the workpiece can be secured with screws on a hidden face that helps. It may be necessary to remove all but one wheel to accommodate feeding the curve. A serpentine curve like a Maloof rocker would be more difficult than a plain arc.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    954
    Kevin,
    I generally use the feeder on long and flatter curves. Tight radius I prefer hand feed. On door and window parts the template can usually be screwed somewhere. In this picture I attached to the tenons. Using the feeder - one wheel by tilting on its nose or if your feeder does not do that just remove wheels. The center of wheel should be approximately 20mm to the outfeed side of cutter center.
    my templates are quick and dirty and would stress for first time users to build good templates. It’s also possible with split tooling for door and window work to use no template but that’s another subject.

    88747C10-B61D-4AD5-A7E0-14E6C941C2C0.jpgA2BA58C8-98EA-461A-BF3B-8AC31EC66904.jpg

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    954
    Bandsaw and sanding is a method I use for a lot of one off work. I have a nice Oliver 381 that makes that easy. But generally shaper is better if any quantity or in the case of windows and doors where a profile is required.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    741
    Thanks for all the replies. One of the reasons why I started this now, before I'm ready to try, is I wanted time to process all of the different opinions.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    741
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Haus View Post
    I have a 3 HP Grizzly shaper that I've used for similar work. Normally has a 3/4" spindle in it, but I also have a 1" spindle for it. When I was doing rockers, I first made my templates and had toggle clamps to hold the work piece down onto the template. As far as a cutterhead I've tried a 2" high conventional cutter with OK results most of the time. I've since gotten a 2" high spiral insert cutter head for it which I prefer. It's 4" o.d. with a 1 1/4" bore along with a 4" bearing. To use the cutter and bearing, I use a pair of T-bushings along with a Double T-bushing to fit between the cutter and bearing (I have 3/4" to 1 1/4" and 1" to 1 1/4" T-bushings and Double T-bushings) , I did mill one side of the double bushing down about maybe 1/8" so the double and T-bushing did not touch each other inside the bearing. With this setup I can use the cutter and bearing on either spindle in the shaper as sometimes it's a quick job and don't want to swap out the spindle.
    The templates I used are extended maybe 3" to 4" beyond the end of the work piece on both ends. Using a starter pin I'm able to pivot the template in the area before the work piece onto the bearing then move the template and work piece past the cutterhead to end beyond the piece to be shaped. Once the bottom arc is done, I use another template and shape the upper portion of the rocker. Been doing this for some time and it's worked out well. Happens I've gotten great results with the spiral insert cutterhead regardless of the grain in the pieces being shaped. The work pieces are trimmed to about 1/8" proud of the line to be shaped to, so it's not a massive cut though this spiral cutterhead seems to be able to hog off much more wood if desired though I don't do that.
    Hope that helps
    Paul, what speed do you run your spiral cutter at?

  11. #26
    if its a poitras 2800 I seem to remember them being 7,000 RPM

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Santa Cruz, CA
    Posts
    77
    Yes, that's correct, Jamie. Apologize again that I didn't photograph the process very well. The third photo shows the template on the piece. Its not a great example because its better if the template is long to give a little bit of lead it. Also, since then, I have started to put the follower on the bottom, so that I can clamp it to the table. The other thing that I have started to do is make the follower the inverse shape of the template curve to give better registration. I also apologize for using the term "follower" as it doesn't seem to follow anything and its in front of the blade, not behind it, though I have also started to use one that is both in front and behind. I'll try to take better photos and maybe start a new thread next time I batch some curved chair parts.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
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    9,151
    Quote Originally Posted by scott lipscomb View Post
    .. I'll try to take better photos and maybe start a new thread next time I batch some curved chair parts...
    That would be good. I think I see what's going on, but I'll bet there's more.

  14. #29
    was told 7000 RPM but found 6000 on printed material

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Zeller View Post
    Paul, what speed do you run your spiral cutter at?
    I run it at the lower shaper speed, 7K rpm IIRC. Hope that helps.

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