Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 26 of 26

Thread: Walnut Log help

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Hill, NC
    Posts
    2,339
    Jebidiah, the first photo in your pix shows an off-center pith in the log, and a wide sapwood band. The off-center pith indicates either a leaning tree, or a log end right below where the tree may have forked. Either way, there are inconsistent stresses in the log in the area of the off entered pith, and the wood will usually warp, twist, etc more than normal.

    The wide sapwood band is a concern (typically found in yard trees) because although it shrinks at the same rate, sapwood will dry faster than the heart wood, causing shrinkage stresses to occur along the outside of the boards. This typically leads to very deep end splits in the lumber.

    Im not able to read the log ends where you have applied the colored sealer, but it appears that the pith may be more centered in them, which is good.

    If it were me, I would not mill live edge lumber from any of the logs that had a very wide sapwood band (wider than 10% of the overall log diameter. Said differently, on a 20 diameter log, no more than 1 of sapwood on each side). The reason why is that many of the boards tend to split 2 - 3 feet into the board, rendering them almost useless.

    My mix of lumber would be 1/3 milled at 4/4, 1/3 at 5/4, and 1/3 at 8/4, but Id look at each log before making a final determination.

    I would not square the cant, but edge *some* but not all of the sapwood from each plank after milling, leaving 3/4 - 1 per side. That will allow you to have some nice bookmatched boards. Also, when the boards are straight line ripped after drying, having a narrow sapwood band along the edge of the boards will allow you to edge off sapwood instead of heart wood.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    West Granby CT
    Posts
    653
    Yes, I have thought about it more then once for all those reasons. I guess I have been more worried about the “learning curve”.

    One of the versions of the WoodMizer LT 15 seems like it would fall into what I would end up with. They make a wider version now, of course different engine choices from 14hp on up, and the option for push, crank, or automatic operation in that series.

    I wouldn’t need to travel anywhere with it and I have a tractor and forks to load logs.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    6,539
    Good info Scott. Thanks very much, from a guy who just started milling with a bandsaw mill about a year ago, but with a chainsaw mill for 15 years prior to that.

    OP, if you are interested in buying a mill, Woodland Mills new HM-130Max is hard to beat on price and performance. $4300 for a ground based mill that can handle a 30" dia log and also mill the full 30" width. You can extend the length to 16 ft or more, and you can add their Woodlander trailer, too, if you want a portable unit. I have last year's model, the HM-130 on the trailer, with log loading ramps and a hand winch to roll the logs up onto the mill. This is about a 24" black walnut log going up onto the mill.



    Between cuts I roll the log or cant on the mill with a cant hook most of the time, but for really heavy ones I use the winch by adding a cant hook to the end of the cable and wrapping it around the log. I stole that idea from Norwood and it works great. The mill truly is a one man operation. Hydraulics would be great, but I was on a budget (who isn't), and what you see in the photo plus extra blades and parts kit came to about $7300.

    The mill is super easy to operate and gives excellent cut quality:



    I was concerned the 14 hp motor wouldn't be enough but have been pleasantly surprised that it's more than enough even when cutting up to the 22" limit. Green wood cuts a lot easier than what we are used to with dry wood in our shops.

    Thanks for the feedback on what the mill operators are charging. Now that people know I have a mill they are starting to ask how much I would charge to mill their logs.

    If you want to build a solar kiln, it's not a hard project. After I bought the mill I built one with about 750 bf capacity using loosely based on plans from Wood magazine. I use solar panels to power the fans. It will dry air dry wood to 7% in 3 - 5 weeks.




    The drier cost about $2K all in to build.


    John

  4. #19
    Wow, what a great thread. It has been great being a fly on this wall. Thanks for sharing, Guys.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    West Granby CT
    Posts
    653
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott T Smith View Post
    Jebidiah, the first photo in your pix shows an off-center pith in the log, and a wide sapwood band. The off-center pith indicates either a leaning tree, or a log end right below where the tree may have forked. Either way, there are inconsistent stresses in the log in the area of the off entered pith, and the wood will usually warp, twist, etc more than normal.

    The wide sapwood band is a concern (typically found in yard trees) because although it shrinks at the same rate, sapwood will dry faster than the heart wood, causing shrinkage stresses to occur along the outside of the boards. This typically leads to very deep end splits in the lumber.

    I’m not able to read the log ends where you have applied the colored sealer, but it appears that the pith may be more centered in them, which is good.

    If it were me, I would not mill live edge lumber from any of the logs that had a very wide sapwood band (wider than 10% of the overall log diameter. Said differently, on a 20” diameter log, no more than 1” of sapwood on each side). The reason why is that many of the boards tend to split 2 - 3 feet into the board, rendering them almost useless.

    My mix of lumber would be 1/3 milled at 4/4, 1/3 at 5/4, and 1/3 at 8/4, but I’d look at each log before making a final determination.

    I would not square the cant, but edge *some* but not all of the sapwood from each plank after milling, leaving 3/4 - 1” per side. That will allow you to have some nice bookmatched boards. Also, when the boards are straight line ripped after drying, having a narrow sapwood band along the edge of the boards will allow you to edge off sapwood instead of heart wood.
    Thank you much for the info. I wish I took pics before I painted the ends, next time. The only one I hadn’t painted was the one I posted and that was the one 32’ feet up the tree. I just finished getting the logs up off the ground and squared a few of the ends....but of course I painted them before I read this. I did not measure the sap wood unfortunately but I think it was about 1”-1.5” or so. I did measure the pith and the bottom of the first log was about as centered as you can get at 28” diameter. The top of the next 8 foot log was also closely centered and was a 24” diameter. The sap on that end looked uniform but I didn’t pay much attention beyond that. I will be happy with whatever I get but your tips will certainly help getting usable stuff.

    Thank you.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    West Granby CT
    Posts
    653
    Thank you John TenEyck, I will check out the mill and the kiln plans.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    West Granby CT
    Posts
    653
    Scott Smith-

    I took a walk out to admire my organized pile. I’m afraid the only end that you can see much through the paint is the one shown. It is the top of the first 8’ section. The sap wood is about 1 1/2” each side and the diameter inside the bark is 26”. That doesn’t fall under the 10% rule so don’t slab any of this? Or is it close enough to give it a try and hope for the best? It will get used either way. I measured the centers top and bottom of the first (3) 8 footers and they are either nicely centered or as much as half inch off or so from center.

    I should have taken pics. Through internet research it seems you should seal the ends ASAP, so that is what I did. Of course I could have taken a pic before but it didn’t even cross my mind.

    A big hunk of bark peeled off the first 8’ log when I tried to get my forks under it, man that was heavy. Do the vertical lines / raised ridges mean anything I should be concerned about?

    If you see something that makes this project a waste of time? I certainly won’t be offended. So far I am into it for my time and $100 for the transport, even as firewood it would still be a win. I’d much rather have firewood then a big stack of twisted split junk, after paying a Sawyer, stacking etc......I have never had firewood do anything but what it was supposed to...haha

    D27E8D21-F55A-4471-A3FC-22006643A330.jpg

    3A707158-EA49-472C-B965-869F3F13A039.jpg

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    9,470
    Quote Originally Posted by Jebediah Eckert View Post
    Thank you much for the info. I wish I took pics before I painted the ends, next time. ...
    What paint did you use? The reason I ask is oil-based paints are reasonably good but latex paint has a poor reputation for protecting the end grain, even with several coats. Apparently moisture travels quickly through latex. I read in a government brochure that aluminum paint is good.

    A commonly used sealer is AnchorSeal from UC Coatings. It's a water-based wax emulsion, goes on with a paint brush or a sprayer, and dries to a coat of paraffin. Wax lets some water through but helps a lot to prevent end grain checks and cracks by slowing the moisture loss at the ends enough to let the moisture gradient inside flatten. I and other woodturners I know use it on the end grain of every turning blank and all good logs that I saw. A log without a good sealant will crack on the end since rapid drying from the pores causes rapid shrinkage in the first few inches. Many don't seal at all but I find I lose about 6" from each end without sealing.

    Fortunately, walnut is fairly stable when drying compared to some species.

    JKJ

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    West Granby CT
    Posts
    653
    It was leftover “oops” color exterior paint I bought for some beehives years ago and this was extra. I figured it was free, I had it on hand, and had to get rid of it anyhow. I used AnchorSeal on the cherry logs from years ago. If it wasn’t for the virus I would have ventured out and bought a bucket of it.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Hill, NC
    Posts
    2,339
    Quote Originally Posted by Jebediah Eckert View Post
    Scott Smith-

    I took a walk out to admire my organized pile. Im afraid the only end that you can see much through the paint is the one shown. It is the top of the first 8 section. The sap wood is about 1 1/2 each side and the diameter inside the bark is 26. That doesnt fall under the 10% rule so dont slab any of this? Or is it close enough to give it a try and hope for the best? It will get used either way. I measured the centers top and bottom of the first (3) 8 footers and they are either nicely centered or as much as half inch off or so from center.

    I should have taken pics. Through internet research it seems you should seal the ends ASAP, so that is what I did. Of course I could have taken a pic before but it didnt even cross my mind.

    A big hunk of bark peeled off the first 8 log when I tried to get my forks under it, man that was heavy. Do the vertical lines / raised ridges mean anything I should be concerned about?

    If you see something that makes this project a waste of time? I certainly wont be offended. So far I am into it for my time and $100 for the transport, even as firewood it would still be a win. Id much rather have firewood then a big stack of twisted split junk, after paying a Sawyer, stacking etc......I have never had firewood do anything but what it was supposed to...haha

    D27E8D21-F55A-4471-A3FC-22006643A330.jpg

    3A707158-EA49-472C-B965-869F3F13A039.jpg
    I think that youre ok to slab it, but I would edge 1/2 to 2/3 of the sapwood off; otherwise it may split significantly on you.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    West Granby CT
    Posts
    653
    Thanks Scott, appreciate it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •