Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst ... 2345678910 LastLast
Results 76 to 90 of 137

Thread: Made in China sentiment

  1. #76
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,961
    Prop-65 warning may also get triggered by packaging.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #77
    its been around forever in different ways. I can think of friends who said no their parents wont buy a german car.

  3. #78
    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Lake View Post
    its been around forever in different ways. I can think of friends who said no their parents wont buy a german car.
    This reminds me of my friend Steve who was an event photographer in the 80s. He got hired to shoot a Bat Mitzvah, and the day before the event, the client called him and stipulated that he was not allowed to use a German camera because if the Grandma saw it, she'd come unglued.
    He was a bit heartbroken to have to leave his favorite Rollei twin lens reflex at home, but luckily he also owned a Nikon which saved the day.
    The rest of us tried to persuade him to load it with Agfa film, but he didn't want to live dangerously.
    Good times.

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    6,481
    Blog Entries
    7
    That sentiment still oddly common, I think it is often to avoid dishonoring those who served or those affected by a terrible regime. I don't know people in the latter group, but I know a few who have served. I greatly admire those who’ve served but have also taken notice that many of them do not hold those same resentments toward former enemies. Also, given that we've put so much effort into rebuilding those former enemies into allies it seems reasonable to patronize them. I certainly don't mean to speak for veterans, but this has been a phenomenon I have witnessed.

    My grandfather, as example, who fought from D-Day +3 and with the 86th Airborne until VE Day (and finished his duty in the Phillipines) found an enjoyment in restoring Volkswagen cars. My grandfather in his division helped to liberate Attendorn labor camp.

    I also recall having watched a program about a D-day veteran who became pen-pals, and finally good friends in real life, with a German machine gunner who manned a pillbox on Omaha beach. Couldn't find the GI's name in a quick search but I found the Wehrmacht soldier. Anywho, if those two can become friends, anyone can let past grievances go.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_Severloh
    Last edited by Brian Holcombe; 05-20-2020 at 2:37 PM.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  5. #80
    I'm all for made in (Insert your own country you currently live in)...USA for me. But, if I have to choose a more inexpensive version due to my project requirements at the time, I don't mind buying from other countries and China wouldn't be different to me whether it's Cambodia, Taiwan or Japan. It's all the same to me and they all have the same horrible guidelines when it comes to how they treat their workers.

    What are we going to do when we have to buy a phone, computer, tablet? Heck, a CNC machine? It very well is going to come from overseas and most of the time, China.

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    3,926
    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    In light of this discussion, I find myself wondering if people in other countries have similar conversations over the reluctance to buy products from the USA for political or quality perception reasons.

    Or is it a uniquely American attitude?
    I think if you were able to widely poll the global population you would find a massive amount of individuals who despise the USA for a multitude of reasons. Some for good reason, some because of propaganda, some due to political, social, economic, and military, issues.

    A close friend once spend some time interning in college in Australia, and he commented endlessly about going out to a bar on an evening and being repeatedly referred to as a "sepo". Someone from the US was referred to as coming from "the septic tank".

    This is from an ally nation, a white nation. You do the math extrapolated out to those that are non-white, dont like us to begin with, we have exploited,... I'd guess your poll would have some weight on all sides.

    Sadly as it pertains to this thread it doesnt really have anything to due with nation of origin. It has to do with what the corporations and marketing profiteers specify the country of origin to make and they, for the sake of money, allow themselves to be sold down the river with a perceived reputation.
    Last edited by Mark Bolton; 05-21-2020 at 5:08 PM.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  7. #82
    To some people the USA is a lot like Tom Brady ; we are too talented and win too much. My question to the Aussie who
    does not like us is : When do the natives get some beach property?

  8. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Bolton View Post
    I think if you were able to widely poll the global population you would find a massive amount of individuals who despise the USA for a multitude of reasons. Some for good reason, some because of propaganda, some due to political, social, economic, and military, issues.
    Well it's far from a wide poll, but since posting my question, I have been casually asking about other countries' perceptions, and a friend who does a fair amount of business in China told me an interesting story. It's well known that the middle class in China is exploding, and apparently American products are held in high regard. As an example it holds huge bragging rights for people with young families to buy items such as baby formula, diapers, strollers other such products from Costco because of the prestige associated with American brands. And of course these people make sure all their friends know that they are buying these products.
    Having a Tesla is a major status symbol in China because they see it as an iconic American brand. Maybe even more so than we do here in the US.

  9. #84
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Peshtigo,WI
    Posts
    882
    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    In light of this discussion, I find myself wondering if people in other countries have similar conversations over the reluctance to buy products from the USA for political or quality perception reasons.

    Or is it a uniquely American attitude?
    When I was in the Navy and on deployments in the Mediterranean I would enjoy buying newspapers from various countries that were printed in English just to see what they had to say about us. Not all of it was good.
    Confidence: The feeling you experience before you fully understand the situation

  10. #85
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,961
    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    Having a Tesla is a major status symbol in China because they see it as an iconic American brand. Maybe even more so than we do here in the US.
    The same with Buick...probably the only reason the brand still exists in GM is the huge Chinese market for the brand.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Bruette View Post
    When I was in the Navy and on deployments in the Mediterranean I would enjoy buying newspapers from various countries that were printed in English just to see what they had to say about us. Not all of it was good.
    Fair enough. Not everything I say about france is good either. And if I can talk trash, why can't they? At the end of the day, we often demonstrate why this is a great country. Plenty of faults. But plenty of heart. Gordon Sinclair said it very well. Go listen again, if it's been a while. LINK
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  12. #87
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    9,985
    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    In light of this discussion, I find myself wondering if people in other countries have similar conversations over the reluctance to buy products from the USA for political or quality perception reasons.

    Or is it a uniquely American attitude?
    Yes we do....Rod

  13. #88
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    2,487
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Bolton View Post
    I think if you were able to widely poll the global population you would find a massive amount of individuals who despise the USA for a multitude of reasons. Some for good reason, some because of propaganda, some due to political, social, economic, and military, issues.

    A close friend once spend some time interning in college in Australia, and he commented endlessly about going out to a bar on an evening and being repeatedly referred to as a "sepo". Someone from the US was referred to as coming from "the septic tank".

    This is from an ally nation, a white nation. You do the math extrapolated out to those that are non-white, dont like us to begin with, we have exploited,... I'd guess your poll would have some weight on all sides.

    Sadly as it pertains to this thread it doesnt really have anything to due with nation of origin. It has to do with what the corporations and marketing profiteers specify the country of origin to make and they, for the sake of money, allow themselves to be sold down the river with a perceived reputation.
    What Americans Really Think of Australia


    Health care: While Australians may have a moan about the national health care system, to Americans it is nothing short of an incredible gift. In America, medical expenses are a leading cause of bankruptcy, and drug companies dominate politics and advertising. They also admire Australia’s policies to keep cigarette smoking less accessible.


    Free-to-air TV: Watching TV in Australia is as simple as buying a television and plugging it in. Straight away you are met with a variety of channels, all without paying another cent. In America, you can’t get any channels without paying fees to a cable or satellite company. And when you do, you are given so many channels it’s completely overwhelming to a lot of people.


    Food: Australia is a country full of culturally diverse cuisine, and the majority of our chefs take pride in using only the freshest ingredients. Supermarkets are doing great at promoting healthy foods over pre-packaged salt-ridden goods, and the coffee is just as good as in countries such as Paris and Italy.


    Boutique shops: Boutique shops are a thing of the past in America, especially in big towns and cities. Identical malls sell identical wares and serve identical foods from identically inferior cafes and restaurants. In Australia, all you have to do is walk along King St in Newtown, Sydney and you will be flooded with unique stores.


    Roads: Roads in Australia are simple and generally traffic-free, as opposed to insanely knotted with looping overpasses and busy traffic made up of angry people running late.


    Religion: While religion is very much a part of Australian life, it’s not thrown in your face like it is in America. The USA creates big public shows of devotion when it comes to religion, meaning there’s no escaping it.


    Gun laws: While many American’s disagree with our gun laws, for those few Americans that don’t carry guns they love the Australian views on gun ownership. They also respect John Howard for responding to the Port Arthur massacre with definitive actions, instead of just talking about change.


    Accent and language: Americans love the Aussie accent, the rhyming slang, and the Aboriginal place names that sound like they come straight out of a magic book. (Think Attunga, Caboolture, Goondiwindi and Dumbleyung.) They also love the relaxed approach to the English language, and the way we turn words such as Mcdonalds into “Maccas” and Salvation Army into “Salvos”.


    Nature: From rugged wilderness to outback plains, tropical rainforest to white sand beaches, it’s all here in Australia. No matter what kind of experience you are after, you can find it. Skiing, city shopping, bushwalking, scuba diving, white water rafting and mountain climbing … you name it, Australia’s got it.

    Thongs: For an American that loves an immature giggle, they love the opportunity of a snigger every time they see a person wearing ‘flip-flops’.


    Wildlife: Ok so not all of our native wildlife is wonderful (think snakes, spiders and crocs), but for all the bad animals there are hundreds of cute and cuddly creatures, such as koalas and wombats. The kangaroos are pretty cool too, and unlike any other creature on earth.


    The people: Aussies are super friendly, down-to-earth and never in a rush. They’re relaxed about everything and take mishaps in their stride.

  14. #89

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Stewie Simpson View Post
    What Americans Really Think of Australia


    Health care: While Australians may have a moan about the national health care system, to Americans it is nothing short of an incredible gift. In America, medical expenses are a leading cause of bankruptcy, and drug companies dominate politics and advertising. They also admire Australia’s policies to keep cigarette smoking less accessible.


    Free-to-air TV: Watching TV in Australia is as simple as buying a television and plugging it in. Straight away you are met with a variety of channels, all without paying another cent. In America, you can’t get any channels without paying fees to a cable or satellite company. And when you do, you are given so many channels it’s completely overwhelming to a lot of people.


    Food: Australia is a country full of culturally diverse cuisine, and the majority of our chefs take pride in using only the freshest ingredients. Supermarkets are doing great at promoting healthy foods over pre-packaged salt-ridden goods, and the coffee is just as good as in countries such as Paris and Italy.


    Boutique shops: Boutique shops are a thing of the past in America, especially in big towns and cities. Identical malls sell identical wares and serve identical foods from identically inferior cafes and restaurants. In Australia, all you have to do is walk along King St in Newtown, Sydney and you will be flooded with unique stores.


    Roads: Roads in Australia are simple and generally traffic-free, as opposed to insanely knotted with looping overpasses and busy traffic made up of angry people running late.


    Religion: While religion is very much a part of Australian life, it’s not thrown in your face like it is in America. The USA creates big public shows of devotion when it comes to religion, meaning there’s no escaping it.


    Gun laws: While many American’s disagree with our gun laws, for those few Americans that don’t carry guns they love the Australian views on gun ownership. They also respect John Howard for responding to the Port Arthur massacre with definitive actions, instead of just talking about change.


    Accent and language: Americans love the Aussie accent, the rhyming slang, and the Aboriginal place names that sound like they come straight out of a magic book. (Think Attunga, Caboolture, Goondiwindi and Dumbleyung.) They also love the relaxed approach to the English language, and the way we turn words such as Mcdonalds into “Maccas” and Salvation Army into “Salvos”.


    Nature: From rugged wilderness to outback plains, tropical rainforest to white sand beaches, it’s all here in Australia. No matter what kind of experience you are after, you can find it. Skiing, city shopping, bushwalking, scuba diving, white water rafting and mountain climbing … you name it, Australia’s got it.

    Thongs: For an American that loves an immature giggle, they love the opportunity of a snigger every time they see a person wearing ‘flip-flops’.


    Wildlife: Ok so not all of our native wildlife is wonderful (think snakes, spiders and crocs), but for all the bad animals there are hundreds of cute and cuddly creatures, such as koalas and wombats. The kangaroos are pretty cool too, and unlike any other creature on earth.


    The people: Aussies are super friendly, down-to-earth and never in a rush. They’re relaxed about everything and take mishaps in their stride.
    Sounds awesome!

  15. #90
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    3,926
    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    Well it's far from a wide poll, but since posting my question, I have been casually asking about other countries' perceptions, and a friend who does a fair amount of business in China told me an interesting story. It's well known that the middle class in China is exploding, and apparently American products are held in high regard. As an example it holds huge bragging rights for people with young families to buy items such as baby formula, diapers, strollers other such products from Costco because of the prestige associated with American brands. And of course these people make sure all their friends know that they are buying these products.
    Having a Tesla is a major status symbol in China because they see it as an iconic American brand. Maybe even more so than we do here in the US.
    Yeah.. and there is also a cultural movement afoot in China that having an obese child is a symbol of affluence (because you have the ability to over feed your child). Then add in the instant Walmart Walmart hormone laden food landed in their culture breast started to grow (dairy hormones produce larger udders) as well as cancers.

    Dont know what the point is other than watch what you wish for.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •