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Thread: Poplar doors. Laminated or solid?

  1. #1
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    Poplar doors. Laminated or solid?

    I am getting ready to build some interior doors out of poplar to paint. Would it be stable to use 8/4 poplar and dimension to 1 3/4" or glue up laminations?

  2. #2
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    Are these frame-and-panel doors, so the 8/4 poplar you're talking about is just the frame, right?

  3. #3
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    Correct. That would be for the frame.

  4. #4
    I ve seen solid poplar doors in old houses that were just fine ,open or closed. Some of them 8 footers. I can get the stiles perfectly straight with poplar from a good dealer. Don't think anyone can when the stuff is crooked and twisted and poorly
    handled.
    If you have confidence in yourself and your machines ,I see no reason to not use the poplar. Sometimes architects will
    over rule anything for stiles except "stave core".

  5. #5
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    A lot (to me) would depend on the grade and your confidence in your supplier/sawyer/drier
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  6. #6
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    If the wood is at EMC with your shop, sure, why not? Look for fat 8/4 stock and mill it flat and plane it oversize, then set it on edge and let it rest for a day or two. If it's still flat then plane it to your finished thickness and you should be good to go from there. If the wood is stable it doesn't matter if it's one piece, laminated, or stave core + veneer.

    Note that I said "at EMC with your shop". If you start with wood that's not in balance with your shop it's probably going to move as you work it, and that almost never ends well.

    John

  7. #7
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    I built 31 interior doors out of Maple. After milling, glue-up sanding through drum sander etc, I ended up mostly close to 1 5/8" than 1 3/4" (maybe 1 11/16").
    8/4 if it is not rough is rarely 2" (typically 1 15/16 or less).

  8. #8
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    Typically interior doors are 1 3/8". At my hardwood source, rough sawn 6/4 gets you interior door stock. But I prefer soft maple for paint grade, not as fuzzy.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    Typically interior doors are 1 3/8". At my hardwood source, rough sawn 6/4 gets you interior door stock. But I prefer soft maple for paint grade, not as fuzzy.
    1 3/8" is typical interior door thickness with 1 3/4" being a much higher quality option. No idea about the OP but you wont find 1 3/8" interior doors in most high end homes and forget about a commercial application, never 1 3/8".
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  10. #10
    I think Mark accurately describes the modern idea of doors. But I've noticed that the Federal period houses often have
    interior doors that are only 1and 3/8 ...or even 1 and1/4. And one doesn't usually notice it on first look around ,since
    those houses almost never have any heavy thick details.

  11. #11
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    Either way works just fine if the material is stable. The last one I built I laminated, but that was because it made the mortises easy...no cutting them. This was before I had my Domino XL. I did that door at 1.5" since I could also do the groove for the panels at the same time as the lamination, too.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
    Too bad you aren't closer to Ohio. Baird Brothers makes solid wood doors that are excellent quality. I have 9 of their 6 panel oak doors in my house and have not had a problem with any of them. When I looked at making the doors, I couldn't purchase the lumber for the price of an assembled pre-hung oak door from Baird. I don't know if they ship as far west as you are.
    Lee Schierer
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  13. #13
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    Solid should be fine. Depending on your supplier you should be able to get decent material. The closest yard to me carries QS poplar in 6/4, 7/4 and 8/4 just for door production.

    As for Baird, they are priced well as long as you want one of the styles that they stock. If for example you want a 5 panel horizontal with pg sticking and historically accurate slight raise in the panels, they are not dirt cheap.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    Typically interior doors are 1 3/8". At my hardwood source, rough sawn 6/4 gets you interior door stock. But I prefer soft maple for paint grade, not as fuzzy.
    Where do you get your lumber Richard? I'm not terribly far from you. I've never been there but I'm fully aware of Corsaw Hardwood Lumber.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Blue View Post
    Where do you get your lumber Richard? I'm not terribly far from you. I've never been there but I'm fully aware of Corsaw Hardwood Lumber.
    I haven't bought any for years, but always purchased at Pekin Hardwood/Woodworkers Shop. Not sure how much rough sawn they have anymore.
    Last edited by Richard Coers; 05-15-2020 at 11:52 PM.

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