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Thread: Using a #75

  1. #16
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    I'm not sure if you posted about this or not, but would the same thinking apply to the Stanley #90? Reading your final posts really clarify how the #75 works.

    T
    If the thunder don't get you, the lightning will.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Zaffuto View Post
    I'm not sure if you posted about this or not, but would the same thinking apply to the Stanley #90? Reading your final posts really clarify how the #75 works.

    T
    Different animal Tony. Nose inline with the sole. I have used one on occasion but never thought it would contribute much to the work I normally do. I have thought about buying a #90 over the years even when they were a lot cheaper. I just never found a place to fit it in. I guess I could be schooled on how others use a #90. Maybe I need one and just donít realize it.

  3. #18
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    There are two varieties of Stanley planes designated as #90.

    One is the well known bull nose Shoulder plane:

    #90 Shoulder.jpg

    The other is a skew blade Rabbet plane:

    Old #90 Raising to the Ocassion.jpg

    They both have their uses.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #19
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    This was a bit too rich for me..
    Birthday Rust Hunt, too much.JPG
    And...when did they make them out of brass?
    Birthday Rush Hunt, gold-plated.JPG
    I'm sure there were a #75 or two...
    Birthday Rust Hunt, OUCH.JPG
    Somewhere in this case....

  5. #20
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    One of my #75 planes had slots cut in the base. It looked to be original:

    Top side.jpg

    It looked like a way to mount a fence:

    Fenced.jpg

    It actually worked okay:

    In Use.jpg

    This did have a Stanley blade. The blade may have been a replacement.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    One of my #75 planes had slots cut in the base. It looked to be original:

    Top side.jpg

    It looked like a way to mount a fence:

    Fenced.jpg

    It actually worked okay:

    In Use.jpg

    This did have a Stanley blade. The blade may have been a replacement.

    jtk
    Interesting. Many adaptations were made Iím sure in attempts to get the plane to work cutting full rabbets. You have either a shop redesign or a very rare prototype. Iím definitely not a plane expert. What is of interest to me is all of the major makers made the plane. Itís just the use of it got lost somewhere.

  7. #22
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    Later today, I'm going to dig out my MF equivalent of the #75 and see if I can get it to work, using the advice given in this thread. I'm also going to dig out my Stanley #90 bullnose, and try the same with it. These are both planes that have been put away for maybe 15 to 20 to 25 years.
    If the thunder don't get you, the lightning will.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Pallas View Post
    Interesting. Many adaptations were made I’m sure in attempts to get the plane to work cutting full rabbets. You have either a shop redesign or a very rare prototype. I’m definitely not a plane expert. What is of interest to me is all of the major makers made the plane. It’s just the use of it got lost somewhere.
    It looked to be done in the making as there were bosses around the slots. It was sold on ebay so someone else now has an oddity or a rarity.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Pallas View Post
    Interesting. Many adaptations were made I’m sure in attempts to get the plane to work cutting full rabbets. You have either a shop redesign or a very rare prototype. I’m definitely not a plane expert. What is of interest to me is all of the major makers made the plane. It’s just the use of it got lost somewhere.
    30 seconds tops and my MF #75 equivalent works! The toe is shallower like the Stanley, so I just set the blade even to the main sole. The blade needs a sharpening and the main sole needs flattened (visibly low at each side behing the mouth). Thanks for the tip, Jim!

    I did not dig out my Stanley #90 (as I mrntioned earlier in this thread).
    If the thunder don't get you, the lightning will.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Zaffuto View Post
    30 seconds tops and my MF #75 equivalent works! The toe is shallower like the Stanley, so I just set the blade even to the main sole. The blade needs a sharpening and the main sole needs flattened (visibly low at each side behing the mouth). Thanks for the tip, Jim!

    I did not dig out my Stanley #90 (as I mrntioned earlier in this thread).
    Glad I could help Tony. You will probably find more uses for that little plane.

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