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Thread: Extend power cord on PM 60HH jointer

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by derek labian View Post
    Hi Jason,

    You can use a wire size calculator to estimate what you'll need. As Jim said, I think the voltage drop won't have any impact at that distance, but you can use the calculator to tinker around and find a configuration you like. I am not an electrician.

    Calculator I use:

    http://wiresizecalculator.net/
    Thanks Derek.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Schuch View Post
    2hp @ 220v will pull a max of about 6amps - a 12 gauge extension cord will handle 14 amps which will be more than plenty! No need to go with 10 gauge , that will just be more expensive and fatter and more cord to move around.

    The tech doesn't know what he is talking about. Get a 20' 12 gauge extension cord, cut off the receptacle end and make it as long as you need.
    Thanks Michael.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Endres View Post
    Just found this thread, I have been using twist-lock extension cords on all my machines for years, because they are all in the middle of the shop and my receptacles are on the walls. I don't have pigtails at the machine but that is a great idea. I used to work with a guy who cut all but six inches off all his hand-held power tools (this was 30+ years ago when cordless tools were in infancy) and he equipped all of the cutoff ends with a new male end, and then used one extension cord for everything. Made the tools much easier to store, I guess. I do like Hubbell or Pass&Seymour/LeGrand connectors, buy the commercial or industrial rated cord ends. I use SJOOW 12-gauge cord for everything. Prefer orange, yellow or bright blue if I can get it, it's easy to see on the shop floor.
    Thanks for the brand recommendation, Jon. I like bright colors too.

  4. #34
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    In addition to my previous comments, this is a good example of where I personally like to use the pigtail method. With the machine "that far" from the actual receptacle, using a pigtail gives you a 100% positive disconnect right at the machine and also allows you to get a long cord out of the way easily should there be a need to do so. You can "right-size" the cord, too...not too long and not too short. I use the pigtail method for most of my machines.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    In addition to my previous comments, this is a good example of where I personally like to use the pigtail method. With the machine "that far" from the actual receptacle, using a pigtail gives you a 100% positive disconnect right at the machine and also allows you to get a long cord out of the way easily should there be a need to do so. You can "right-size" the cord, too...not too long and not too short. I use the pigtail method for most of my machines.
    I can't decide if I like the pigtail idea or not. I can see it being advantageous to having the tool be cord free if need be, but the idea of a second connection in the line vs just one long cord adds a little bit of worry of voltage drop or something damaging the motor. If I had several machines with the pigtails I could see the advantage outweighing the worry.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Evans View Post
    I asked grizzly again, and nope. Still don't know how I'm getting it out of the crate when it comes.
    Try this, go put another jointer in your shopping cart, choose check out and see if the $34 option for liftgate service is on the screen. If so send the Grizzly boneheads a screen shot.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Schuch View Post
    2hp @ 220v will pull a max of about 6amps - a 12 gauge extension cord will handle 14 amps which will be more than plenty! No need to go with 10 gauge , that will just be more expensive and fatter and more cord to move around.
    Minor nit but full load current on a 2HP single phase motor is much higher than 6A. Typical motors can be up to 12A. 12 or 14 gauge cords will handle the full load current but during startup the current will be much higher, typically a 6x multiple, but could by higher. Each plug/receptacle adds some contact resistance; the amount will depend on the age and wear on the receptacle. 20 ft of 12 AWG is probably fine but 10 AWG gives a little extra margin if the machine is a long way from the breaker.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Evans View Post
    I can't decide if I like the pigtail idea or not. I can see it being advantageous to having the tool be cord free if need be, but the idea of a second connection in the line vs just one long cord adds a little bit of worry of voltage drop or something damaging the motor. If I had several machines with the pigtails I could see the advantage outweighing the worry.
    I use twist locks which are very secure when locked together, I doubt there's any issue with loss. Of course, there's a price to pay for these connections over the simpler version.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I use twist locks which are very secure when locked together, I doubt there's any issue with loss. Of course, there's a price to pay for these connections over the simpler version.
    Lowes/Home Depot charge an arm and a leg for twist lock cord ends.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Coolidge View Post
    Lowes/Home Depot charge an arm and a leg for twist lock cord ends.
    I generally order them online from Amazon. And some of mine are nearly two decades old, so the real cost over time isn't too steep, honestly.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Schuch View Post
    2hp @ 220v will pull a max of about 6amps - a 12 gauge extension cord will handle 14 amps which will be more than plenty! No need to go with 10 gauge , that will just be more expensive and fatter and more cord to move around.

    The tech doesn't know what he is talking about. Get a 20' 12 gauge extension cord, cut off the receptacle end and make it as long as you need.

    I purchase pretty much used equipment, the older the better. That means putting new cords on pretty much everything. I like molded plugs so I use a lot of extensions cords with one end cut off as new power cables. I almost get excited when I buy a hand power tool with a bad cord knowing that I get to replace it with a long cord!

    14AWG flexible cord with 2 current carrying conductors is rated for 18 amperes, you don’t need anything larger….Regards, Rod.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I generally order them online from Amazon. And some of mine are nearly two decades old, so the real cost over time isn't too steep, honestly.
    I buy them used on the bay. Around $10 each delivered. Sometimes you can get a deal on several in a set sold together. I would rather have a used USA made one then a new China made version.
    Bill D

  13. Quote Originally Posted by Jason Evans View Post
    I'll wait and see what size wire the switch box can accommodate.
    I looked at the box and cord yesterday, 14AWG and stiff as a board PVC cord bent into a Z accordion. The plastic box has a press fit cheap strain relief there's no nut and the hole looks pretty small. Fortunately there's the long steel pole the on/off switch/box is screwed to. I'm going to mount a steel electrical box on the back side lower down. Cut the existing cord short and plumb it into the steel box. I'll either install a 10/3 220 twist lock outlet in the box and make up an extension cord or wire a long cord to the box directly. Kind of like the idea of being able to remove the cord and hang on a wall. The rear mount for the lifting hook would also be a good spot to bolt on a U to hang the cord on.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Coolidge View Post
    I looked at the box and cord yesterday, 14AWG and stiff as a board PVC cord bent into a Z accordion. The plastic box has a press fit cheap strain relief there's no nut and the hole looks pretty small. Fortunately there's the long steel pole the on/off switch/box is screwed to. I'm going to mount a steel electrical box on the back side lower down. Cut the existing cord short and plumb it into the steel box. I'll either install a 10/3 220 twist lock outlet in the box and make up an extension cord or wire a long cord to the box directly. Kind of like the idea of being able to remove the cord and hang on a wall. The rear mount for the lifting hook would also be a good spot to bolt on a U to hang the cord on.
    Don't forget you need a male twist lock at the machine end unless you really want to do a non-standard implementation that could be dangerous if the cord is plugged into the wall and disconnected from the saw. Those prongs would be, um...uncomfortable...to touch.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #45
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    I have a 10/3 cord on my 250amp Lincoln MIG welder... it is a lot of bulk and weight to move around, not flexible and kind of a pain in the rear. I would highly recommend going with a 12/3 cord which will be way overkill in itself. No need at all to go with a 10/3 for a 2hp motor! Grizzly would not have put a 14g cord on the jointer if it wasn't big enough to handle the current of the 2hp motor.
    Last edited by Michael Schuch; 01-24-2022 at 1:55 PM.

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