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Thread: Buying drill for the house, Stay with same system/brand?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Cincinnati Ohio
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    4,513

    Buying drill for the house, Stay with same system/brand?

    My wood shop is located away from the house, Not far, but far enough, if I need a tool I have to grab a coat and flashlight and make my way across the field.

    In the wood shop I have Ryobi tools. I like them.
    I am going to put a small tool cart in the garage at the house to keep tools handy for when I'm assembling something like a grill, lawn tool etc.
    Would you just stick with the Ryobi one plus as in the shop or would you consider another cheaper system?
    What got me to thinking is Walmart now has their line of HART tools made by TTI (Ryobi). They have been running deals.

    Again, I am looking at inexpensive for the house. Never fails I need at drill at the House, it is at the shop. Needed at the shop, left it at the house.
    "Remember back in the day, when things were made by hand, and people took pride in their work?"
    - Rick Dale

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    4,302
    Stay with same battery if not corded.
    Bil lD

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Stay with same battery if not corded.
    Bil lD
    I agree. Only way I'd change is if I was dissatisfied with the tools I have.

    Mike
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Silicon Valley, CA
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    639
    I have always thought of Ryobi as the cheaper brand. That said they're good enough for me and I *really* appreciate the battery compatibility they've embraced. Other brands seem to change the mechanical connection with each generation of their tools (for no apparently reason.) That means you can't buy a new tool to use your old battery or, probably more important, vice versa. Somewhere on their website Ryobi talks about how many generations they've maintained compatibility. I forget the details, but old NiCad tools have compatible battery connections with their latest Li-Ion brushless tools.

    (A thought. Upgrade your shop tools and use the old ones in your house cart?)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Fairbanks AK
    Posts
    264
    Agree with Bill. If you love the battery Ryobi get another one. I have I think 4 corded drills right now, nothing cordless. One is pretty beat just for mixing paint and drywall mud. For piddly last minute stuff in the house I would think about a corded 3/8" drill in the 50-60 buck range. My DeWalt has lasted long enough (>5 years) I would check amazon reviews before I bought another one, but there ought to be a good 3/8 corded drill near that price.I am sure batteries have come a long way since I threw up my hands in disgust 25 years ago... but I like torque. If the drywall is still up a good 3/8 corded can handle it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
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    4,302
    I have bought several corded millwaukee drills 3/8 and 1/2" for under $50 delivered from the bay. Might take a few months to get a deal but a lightly used made in USA milwaukee is better then the China stuff they sell now.
    I think Royobi is owned by some one else and they share batteries. Does Dewalt have lifetime battery warranty?
    That said I stick to Makita 9.6 volt stick tools. I have at least 6 drills, one right angle drill, jig saw, wet tile saw, flashlight, etc
    Bil lD
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 05-12-2020 at 7:45 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
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    62
    For me it’s all Ryobi cordless. They aren’t the top of the line but they are made well enough to last. I have quite a collection of Ryobi tools and batteries. I bought some items for the house and they’re Ryobi (cordless vac, extra drill, tire inflator, hedge trimmer and even the sprayer (I am very pleased with how well it works).

  8. #8
    I had a couple of Ryobi tools, thought they were ok, then got a couple duds. Have they cleaned up their act?

  9. #9
    I have two Ryobi drills and a lot of their other 18V and 40V tools (40V are yard tools). When I broke one and another wandered off I got two more. I have a Milwaukee 12V and a Bosch click. I like them too but for heavier duty work I use a Ryobi. I would either buy a click set for the shop and move the Ryobi in or get another Ryobi.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    52,942
    Very practical to stay with the same brand and battery setup for obvious reasons...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
    I’d stick with the same battery system, but for a “house” drill I’d seriously consider a very light one — 12-volt if available. My buddy bought a little deWalt like that just for light jobs, but now he brings it to the job site and it is his go-to for a lot of work: fits in small spaces, plenty of power, light to carry.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    4,869
    I use Milwaukee in the mechanic shop, and Makita for everything else. They were two different setups on purpose, because I didn't want to get them mixed up, and end up using one that had been used with greasy hands in a house. Otherwise, they would have all been the same.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    290

    Talking

    I’ll take a different angle at this. Eventually, some (although maybe not the OP) will succumb to that new, bright shiny tool from a different platform, like I did, that you absolutely had to have. A terminal disease, I admit. Next thing you know your shop had three or four different battery platforms. Not the end of the world.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Hoschton, Georgia
    Posts
    55
    As long as Ryobi is working for you, I'd stick with the same platform. I went with Rigid because of the lifetime warranty on the tool and batteries. I keep two in the shop and one in the camper. Having multiple batteries that fit all of your drills and impact drivers is convenient.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Vermont
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    242
    I have a similar situation where the shop is about 50 feet from the house and it's a pain in bad weather to head out there and get the tools I need. I have been meaning to do the same thing, since I use my impact driver more than any other cordless tool I own, I've been meaning to get another for the house. I also keep a small Kennedy roller cabinet in the house for other hand tools, so that I don't have to go to the shop for anything "normal" - I keep a decent collection of most hand tools in the house and the majority and specialty tools are in the shop.

    I have a sizable collection of Ryobi cordless tools. Probably 30 different at the moment, and 9 or 10 batteries. I keep one battery charger and a couple batteries in the house, and the rest in the shop. I have never had a Ryobi tool fail, although I've lost a couple of batteries along the way. Started my collection in 2004, still use the first tool, my sawzall, on a regular basis. So saying that, I'd stick with Ryobi.
    Jon Endres
    Killing Trees Since 1983

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