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Thread: What Plane(s) Do You Wish You Hadn't Purchased

  1. #1
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    What Plane(s) Do You Wish You Hadn't Purchased

    This was actually suggested by a Tony Zaffuto in the "Two Favorite Planes" thread:

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Zaffuto View Post
    [edited]
    Maybe we ought to have a thread "what planes do you wish you never purchased"? For me, I guess my Stanley #6 and my LN small chisel plane (or is it the Woodriver 9-1/2 block plane-just too dayam uncomfortable).
    My planes which gave me no joy would start with the Stanley #75 bull nose rabbet plane. The #90 is a better plane if just for the adjuster and lower angle. A bull nose shoulder/rabbet plane is not as useable as the longer nose shoulder planes.

    Next would be a #18 block plane. For me the various standard angle block planes usually do not have an advantage over a bench plane or a low angle block plane.

    A smaller block plane like a #102 or #103 are used because of their convenient sizes.

    Who else has purchased a plane or two that doesn't really work out in their work?

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #2
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    A Wood River No. 4

    Was more trouble than it was worth to use....

  3. #3
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    Large Stanley Sweetheart shoulder plane. I rarely have need of it, so when I finally needed to use it, I pulled it out only to find that it has manufacturing defects. Too late to return it and I was not able to get a hold of Stanley to discuss. The only thing that I saw was that I needed to package everything and send it to an address. I needed a replacement screw, but people here told me how to fix it myself. I am way more inclined to purchase a tool that is not Stanley because of it.

    Shooting plane. I just never used it and did not have a lot of luck when I tried. I finally dumped it and bought a sandpaper based shooting plane, that I have never used...

  4. #4
    Jim,

    Does a WoodJoy cigar shave count? Mostly because it has a A2 cutter that chipped so bad on its first outing as to be almost unsharpenable (not a clue if that is a word). Before I could get a replacement the company closed. IIRC non of the other makers cutters will fit.

    ken

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Pitonyak View Post
    Large Stanley Sweetheart shoulder plane. I rarely have need of it, so when I finally needed to use it, I pulled it out only to find that it has manufacturing defects.
    This is exactly what I was going to say.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    This was actually suggested by a Tony Zaffuto in the "Two Favorite Planes" thread:



    My planes which gave me no joy would start with the Stanley #75 bull nose rabbet plane. The #90 is a better plane if just for the adjuster and lower angle. A bull nose shoulder/rabbet plane is not as useable as the longer nose shoulder planes.

    Next would be a #18 block plane. For me the various standard angle block planes usually do not have an advantage over a bench plane or a low angle block plane.

    A smaller block plane like a #102 or #103 are used because of their convenient sizes.

    Who else has purchased a plane or two that doesn't really work out in their work?

    jtk
    Patrick Leach, in "Blood and Gore" said the #75 is only good for scraping paint or putty from windows. I actually bought the MF equivalent from Patrick for that task. It failed even at that (I forgot about that plane!).
    If the thunder don't get you, the lightning will.

  7. #7
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    I have not cared for the LN 102 bronze plane. Always reach for my apron plane or if real tiny the violin plane.

  8. #8
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    It's a joy to use but I bought one of Steve Knight's last planes. I planned on two large tables and was told a 24'' jointer was not long enough. So I got a 30'' razee with and adjustable mouth. It will take whisper thin shavings and did the job. I have found no real use of it since.

  9. #9
    No. 2 Bailey - really don't know why they exist. Found nothing it could do that a No. 3 or a block plane couldn't do better, for my work anyway. Classic case of "Too many and not enough".

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Hillestad View Post
    No. 2 Bailey - really don't know why they exist. Found nothing it could do that a No. 3 or a block plane couldn't do better, for my work anyway. Classic case of "Too many and not enough".
    It might depend on the work you do. I love my Bailey #2. Different strokes I guess.

    I could live without my LV bevel up smoother - it's basically a 4 1/2 but I seldom use it. (Wont sell it though.) Likewise, my #6C. Bought if from a buddy who had Tom Bussey prep it. Works well - just dont use it.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  11. #11
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    I bought the LN Small Chisel Plane, It's a nice enough plane, well made and works nearly as good as a wide paring chisel. I just never have found any compelling reason to use it.

    DC

  12. #12
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    Cheap planes. Very cheap planes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    This was actually suggested by a Tony Zaffuto in the "Two Favorite Planes" thread:



    My planes which gave me no joy would start with the Stanley #75 bull nose rabbet plane. The #90 is a better plane if just for the adjuster and lower angle. A bull nose shoulder/rabbet plane is not as useable as the longer nose shoulder planes.

    Next would be a #18 block plane. For me the various standard angle block planes usually do not have an advantage over a bench plane or a low angle block plane.

    A smaller block plane like a #102 or #103 are used because of their convenient sizes.

    Who else has purchased a plane or two that doesn't really work out in their work?

    jtk
    I am a power tool centric woodworker but in my three decades of amateur activity I purchased five manual hand planes. Three very low quality Stanleys no. 4 and a block plane. All of them were purchased new at very low price as an unexperienced guy I thought they were like hammers - it doesn't make difference for an occasional user. But if was a sad experience. The first no. 4 I throwed in the garbage and the other two planes only occasionally I tried with mixed results.

    Finally a couple of years ago I decided for a radically different approach: I made my researches and discovered I had very poor technique and that matters for an efficient use of that apparently simple, actually very complex hand tool. Additionally I went to higher quality purchasing LN block and Jack planes. What a difference!

    BTW even my trash planes, sometimes, could make a barely acceptable job when correctly adjusted, sharpened and used.
    All the best.

    Osvaldo.

  13. #13
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    I made my researches and discovered I had very poor technique and that matters for an efficient use of that apparently simple, actually very complex hand tool.
    A baseball bat is an even simpler tool. It can be more complex, requiring even more skill to have any success using it as intended.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Zaffuto View Post
    Patrick Leach, in "Blood and Gore" said the #75 is only good for scraping paint or putty from windows. I actually bought the MF equivalent from Patrick for that task. It failed even at that (I forgot about that plane!).
    Now see I love my 75! I use it on half laps, tenon's, rabbets,
    and other random jobs around the shop. Yes I know there are probably better ways of doing it but it works for me. And it was cheap.

    If I had to pick 2 I would probably say a cheap Irwin record plane I got from Menards before I knew any better. It has plastic handles and they didn't even clean up the sprue from the molding so it cuts your hand in use. I didn't even bother fixing it because it's such a piece of junk.

    The other would be an old beading plane I picked up. It doesn't work well at all and doesn't really have a guide to keep it straight.

  15. #15
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    old Stanley 62 the mouth is chipped on one side and the other has a crack and is starting to chip out so the plane just does not work very good. It looks nice other than that.

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