Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 35

Thread: What Plane(s) Do You Wish You Hadn't Purchased

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    4,876
    The Record 044C combination plane, bought new in the 1970's. I had bought some Record bench planes, shoulder planes, and router planes, and liked all of them.

    I like the Record cutters, and still use them in my 55's, but the 044C has the worst depth stop ever designed. It has a screw that goes down into a plastic sleeve, which is supposed to keep it from moving. It doesn't. Not worth any discussion past that. Don't ever buy one.

    http://www.record-planes.com/record-...-plough-plane/

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Hutchinson, MN
    Posts
    599
    Stanley 9-1/2 block plane. I don’t like anything about it. There’s nothing it can do that a 60-1/2 or DX60 can’t do better. Besides, it’s just enough bigger that it’s not easy to hold, and my hands are not small.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Corcoran, MN
    Posts
    199
    L-N #4 1/2. It is a great plane but too large and heavy for my usage. I'd be happier with a #3.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    twomiles from the "peak of Ohio
    Posts
    8,841
    Well, there was a plane called a Kobalt, still on sale at Lowes....tried it for one week....then returned it for a full refund. It made the ones at Harbor Freight seem like Veritas No. 4s.....yeah, THAT bad.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Borger, Texas
    Posts
    1,418
    I bought two planes hurriedly, without time to really look them over because of a limited time situation. Never again, both had cracks in the body, and after the parts needed to fix them were found and paid for my two bargains ended up costing quite a little more than it would have cost to buy better planes that were already complete and in better shape.

    Stew

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    7,362
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Zaffuto View Post
    Patrick Leach, in "Blood and Gore" said the #75 is only good for scraping paint or putty from windows. ....
    I DISAGREE!!



    It is not even good enough for scraping paint and putty from windows.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    1,767
    A few. A #75, a #45, #46, #6, #5 1/4, #112 Scraper, #12 Scraper, and a handful of assorted block planes. All gone now and I'm better off without them. The all worked well (except the cursed #75) but I never used them. Since I downsized my kit to what I really need versus what I thought was cool I realized how redundant they were.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Ellsworth, Maine
    Posts
    1,652
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Herzog View Post
    I have not cared for the LN 102 bronze plane. Always reach for my apron plane or if real tiny the violin plane.
    That's literally the first time I've ever heard that. This is probably my most used plane of all time. I have so many LN and LV planes too but this plane sits on my bench and touches every piece of wood. Let me know if you want to sell it!

    I would have to say a 70mm Tsunesaburo Kanna is my least favorite and expensive plane that I really should just sell. This was my first jump into Japanese handplanes and I really should have started off with a smaller version. It just is too wide to be comfortable especially when pulling. The other issue is the bed angle is around 40-42 deg which I find is too low for most of my work. It's amazing for softwoods and produces a glass surface but I just don't do enough with those woods. Overall it's a plane I should've never picked up.

    Stanley Medium Shoulder Plane. The Stanley shoulder planes are basically useless when compared to LV or LN. They just are not machined well enough to cut shoulders accurately and I absoluetly never will use this plane again since owning the LN small, LV medium, and LV Large shoulder planes.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    21,657
    Blog Entries
    1
    Rob Luter mentioned a #12 scraper plane. Mine sits forgotten along with a #80 on a shelf.

    Maybe one day my use of scrapers will flourish. So far the joy of scraping has eluded me.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  10. #25
    My first plane regret was a Record #4. Tuned it up tried it and waited for my LN #4 to arrive! Bought twice cried once, sold the dog. LN Bevel up Jack. I thought that this pre-production piece would be the answer to so many problems in my shop. It never was and never will be. I will sell it one day.

    Dishonourable mention: Record compass plane. To be fair the plane did it's job and it was a tough job on a very unique piece made of a trying wood species. It was a pig to use and the sole where it is joined to the frog was a pretty lame effort by Record. I probably solved a problem that didn't exist by silver soldering the joint. I keep this plane out on a shelf just to aggravate myself. Beside it I keep the woodie that I made to see if I could make a better functioning compass plane, albeit with one radius. It was far superior but not adjustable.

    Early on I worked in some pretty tough exotics and any plane was gonna have it rough.

    And shame on me I don't think that I've bought a hand plane in at least 15 years!

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    211
    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Shea View Post
    I absoluetly never will use this plane again since owning the LN small, LV medium, and LV Large shoulder planes.
    Tony, Iím curious. I own and often use the LN Small and Large shoulder planes but not the Medium because Iíve always considered it redundant to the aforementioned. What does the Medium shoulder plane do that the other two canít?

  12. #27
    The one Janicewhokeepsmehumble didn’t know was coming. Eventually, I made her laugh about it. Plus, I washed a lot of dishes.

  13. #28
    Been thinking about this more. There are NO planes I regret purchasing. The reason is that every single one of them has been easy to sell or gift to someone who wants it. I'd say I recovered most of the purchase price. Most of the new and vintage planes i've had did not depreciate from what I paid.

    Owning each for a couple years is a great way to figure out if you can make it work, and how useful it is for you in the long term.

    If I hadn't bought a bullnose, and tried like heck to make it work for 6 months, I would probably still be itching to buy one every time it comes up in the classifieds.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    21,657
    Blog Entries
    1
    Most of the new or vintage planes in my shop have not depreciated greatly from their original price.

    For some, since they were purchased, the 'new' planes' retail prices have risen enough to make their 10-20% depriciation catch up to their original cost.

    The auction and other prices of vintage planes has increased the value of those in my shop.

    It is possible to make a profit by purchasing some old tools at yard/estate/garage sales. It is still possible. It is just more people getting up earlier making it more of a challenge.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    South Coastal Massachusetts
    Posts
    5,741
    Clifton #3.

    Damned heavy, no more useful than a decent block plane and so expensive I worried about using it.

    It went to a good home.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •