Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Thoughts on attaching a laminted walnut top to these metal/automated legs?

  1. #1

    Thoughts on attaching a laminted walnut top to these metal/automated legs?

    Hey All,

    Been working on a simple laminated top build out of walnut, about 1 1/4 inch thick. Just applied a light second coat of Rubios Monocoat and now that's drying. Finally turning my attention to attaching the top to the frame. The frame raises and lowers so you can go from sitting to standing etc etc. I've been debating the best approach to attaching the top. I have a ton of figure 8 washers available to me but I'm not sure they'll be suited here because ideally the top would rest directly onto the frame and with the figure 8 washers the top would rest on the washers first. Each of the attachment points have rubber grommets that can be easily pulled out.

    The desk is an L shape and I've made two separate tops, where the tops meet I plan to just use some simpson strong ties to bring them level to each other and to provide some additional support to the short side. Each of the attachment holes are 5/16ths in diameter. The grain patterns will run perpendicular between the tops.

    Currently my thoughts are maybe to drill out the holes and make them wider and use a thinner screw than the diameter of the holes and some washers and 'snug them up' but I'm not so sure what diameter to drill to and if that would really work. Second option is just to do nothing, there are rubber grommets that are flexible, the opening on the rubber grommets are 1/4" in diameter, I could proceed with the same idea, get some really thin screws/washers and just snug them up and let the rubber compress (but not a ton of room there). I suppose a third option is just not worry about wood movement, there are a good amount of attachment points, however this being a laminated top the majority of the attachment points will run basically down the center of the center 'strips'.

    The widths of the tops are 29 inches

    I have some pictures, any help/advice is appreciated. I have a habit of overthinking and am wondering if just screwing the tops with a little wiggle room would be just fine... https://imgur.com/a/jcAFsN2


    https://imgur.com/a/jcAFsN2
    Last edited by Jon Singh; 05-11-2020 at 3:17 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,917
    You can mount directly to the frame as long as you elongate the holes so that the wood top can expand and contract seasonally across the grain.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,160
    Remove the plastic grommets. You'll be left with a hole through the steel which is 3/8" diameter or so. At each hole use a #8 screw and a washer big enough that it doesn't pull through the hole. For some of the holes -- say the middle ones -- tighten the screws fully. For the others, snug the screws, and then loosen them a half turn or so. They become sliding joints, and accommodate the hygroscopic expansion of the lumber.

  4. #4
    Where did you get the base for the table?
    Dave Davies

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,160
    When I've looked at those electric adjustable bases, the kit has two motorized legs and one control panel. You have three motorized legs. Did you buy two kits and throw away one leg, or does somebody sell a three-leg kit? And how about the control panel? Do you have just one which runs all three motors? Or do you have to use two control panels, and two hands to operate them?

  6. #6
    Thanks all for the help, I think I will go with a combo of advice, I'm thinking I will elongate the screw holes a bit more at the 'ends' and then tighten down the middle screws. At the ends I will leave them snug and loose!

    For the legs I got them from this company:

    https://www.progressiveautomations.com/products/flt-05

    I did some research before buying because there are some similar ones on amazon, but after researching the company and actually talking to them I decided to with them. (All products assembled/tested at their U.S. based warehouse before shipping them to you, 96 month warranty, heavy duty rating, rated for 330 pounds (but this thing can very obviously lift more now that I have it assembled). They themselves supply actuators and other lifting mechanisms so I trust they know what they're doing.

  7. #7
    One control panel controls all three legs! There is a reset mechanism you can use after assembly or i believe after adding a new top.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    4,284
    Not really sure if that heavy top really needs to be held down at all. Some cleats so it does not shift and one screw might do it.
    Bil lD

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    9,160
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Not really sure if that heavy top really needs to be held down at all. Some cleats so it does not shift and one screw might do it.
    Bil lD
    The wide lumber tops might curl with changes in humidity. The steel arms of the base act as cleats to keep them flat.

  10. #10
    Yeah I will have to agree with Jamie on this one, I was debating putting in some C channel into the tops but with the base having the steel arms I figured they should provide enough 'assistance' to keep the top relatively flat over the years.

  11. #11
    You're over thinking things. Between the grommets and some play in the actual connection, you won't see any issues with expansion and contraction.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •