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Thread: Solid wood "slab" cabinet doors

  1. #16
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    Dec 2019
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    New Brunswick, Canada
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    4EB90378-8D86-423F-908B-96222D41063A.jpg

    Mine do not have any battens or such and I’ve had no issues whatsoever. The cabinet company is quite large and offered the doors as a stock choice so I’m sure they don’t have widespread problems.

  2. #17
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    Apr 2008
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    I wouldn't be overly concerned about solid doors. There isn't much difference between a raised panel mitered door and this situation in terms of chances of cupping or bowing. The mitered frame around the panel won't do much to hold the door from twisting or cupping. So the same concern would hold for raised panel doors. Our house is full of raised panel doors (walnut from Walzcraf) and all are dead flat with Zero twist or cup or bow. some are quite large actually.
    I would make the slabs from multiple thin strips (say 2-3" wide) instead of one big slab to make it more stable.

  3. #18
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    Itd something that has always concerned me as well but I have seen numerous slab doors with and without battens that look fantastic years after install. Of course someone goes and tries them flush inset,... no workie.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  4. #19
    I made this cabinet with flush inset slab doors with battens IMG_2719.jpgIMG_2721.jpg These doors were air dried hickory and they are still flat after 8 months. Slamming dors can be eliminated with soft close hinges.
    Last edited by Lee Schierer; 05-08-2020 at 12:52 PM.
    Lee Schierer
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  5. #20
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    Dec 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    I made this cabinet with flush inset slab doors with battens
    Im not saying with good spacing, and a life in a decently climate controlled space it couldnt work but in the world of flush inset a bank of doors with very tight reveals not in an aggressively climate (humidity) controled space, the reveals or even opening and closing, could be a serious callback issue. There are exceptions to every rule.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  6. #21
    The Krenov school's method for resolving this problem is to take a high quality substrate like baltic birch, edge glue pieces of the selected wood species onto all four edges, mitered if you wish. Then completely veneer over both faces. Unless you cut the door apart, there would be no practical way to discern that it was anything other than solid wood throughout, unless you were on a determined mission to do so.

    Plus, this method allows you to edge profile also, if desired so long as you've sized the edge pieces to be wider than the profile. If mitering, the elimination of end grain is a bonus too. Their practice was to use 3/32" shop sawn veneer, but it would still work with the thinner commercial veneer.

    I agree with others that if the client/builder is asking for solid slab doors, some discussion may be in order to determine what it is they are trying to achieve, and how to accomplish the goals without the wood movement risks.

    Edwin
    Last edited by Edwin Santos; 05-08-2020 at 1:31 PM.

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by David Stone (CT) View Post
    I have a kitchen full of exactly what's described: slab doors and drawer fronts made from solid maple, manufactured by KraftMaid--put in probably ten years ago by the prior owner. It's not what I would pick style-wise--overlay doors on face frame cabinets--but has held up fine. Doors are dead flat and nothing has checked or cracked. FWIW, the slabs are made up of strips about 2 inches wide, glued up without any apparent concern for grain orientation and certainly not quarter sawn. ...I do wonder if this kind of construction is more practical in a factory setting where the drying of the lumber and moisture content at time of fabrication could be far better controlled than I could ever achieve in my shop...Attachment 432448
    If you cut one of those doors apart to see the core, I would bet you would be in for a surprise if you think they are made from solid lumber. The strips you are seeing are likely just the outer veneer being laid up randomly.

    Now that I think about it, if you really wanted to know, just unscrew and remove one of the hinge cups and we'll then know if it's live or if it's Memorex.
    Last edited by Edwin Santos; 05-08-2020 at 1:33 PM.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    Arlington, TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    The Krenov school's method for resolving this problem is to take a high quality substrate like baltic birch, edge glue pieces of the selected wood species onto all four edges, mitered if you wish. Then completely veneer over both faces. Unless you cut the door apart, there would be no way to discern that it was anything other than solid wood throughout.
    In fact, this method allows you to edge profile also, if desired so long as you've sized the edge pieces to be wider than the profile. If mitering, the elimination of end grain is a bonus too. Their practice was to use 3/32" shop sawn veneer, but it would still work with the thinner commercial veneer.

    I agree with others that if the client/builder is asking for solid slab doors, some discussion may be in order to determine what it is they are trying to achieve, and how to accomplish the goals without the wood movement risks.

    Edwin
    The long grain on the top and bottom edges would be the tell for most of us, without having to cut it open. Whether it would be obvious to the customer is a different matter.

    -- Andy - Arlington TX

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy D Jones View Post
    The long grain on the top and bottom edges would be the tell for most of us, without having to cut it open. Whether it would be obvious to the customer is a different matter.

    -- Andy - Arlington TX
    DING DING lol. Other than cutting endgrain slices and gluing those top and bottom and then aligning the veneer to the joints.. but if I EVER have someone in my home, that would be that much of a butt hole, they will be shown the door with absolutely zero consideration. lol

    The bottom line is, many posts here, and my own experience, have shot my worry about slab doors down in flames. They can be perfectly fine. Good material selection, hopefully a relatively decent climate conrol in the home, and allowing for the issues I wouldnt hesitate to build them if someone asked.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy D Jones View Post
    The long grain on the top and bottom edges would be the tell for most of us, without having to cut it open. Whether it would be obvious to the customer is a different matter.

    -- Andy - Arlington TX
    Okay, touché, you're right.

    But as Mark indicates, the person who would actually point it out would be the same person who will point out door dings in your car that you already know are there.
    Which is not to say long grain wrapping the entire door is necessarily a bad thing, especially if someone specifying a slab door is looking for a clean, quiet look.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Itapevi, SP - Brazil
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    Exclamation What a coincidence!

    My wife requested today I make a small cabinet for our washing room using solid wood including a single wood panel for the front doors. I will use sliding dovetails at back face to reinforce the solid wood door.

    Coincidence?
    All the best.

    Osvaldo.

  12. #27
    Nothing wrong with solid wood panels. In the case of raised panel that’s pretty much the only way. Go the krenov way if you please but I’m the guy that will point out the couple blemishes in the paint of your new restored car.

    Material selection and mill that material slow. Take the edge glue joints eaqually slow. Just oversized all your stock all the way to your last pass through the planer or sander. Let everything sit stickered between I long and gluing steps and make sure it’s all on a dead flat bench with exact thickness stickers. If your surgical about your construction and don’t use like African mahogany or something stupid you will have no issues.

  13. #28
    I have done this for some pretty wide drawer fronts but not doors. As long as the client is not super picky I think the risk is probably limited to a door or two that need fixed, max. I think it will work OK.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    700
    Thanks everyone. Turns out a local place I use for drawer boxes, Drees Wood Products, make these doors, and told me they've been doing them for years.
    So that makes this job much easier to bid than if I'm trying to figure out the cost of making them myself.
    Drees don't give a warranty on these doors however. Don't blame them!

    thanks, Mark

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Edwin Santos View Post
    If you cut one of those doors apart to see the core, I would bet you would be in for a surprise if you think they are made from solid lumber. The strips you are seeing are likely just the outer veneer being laid up randomly.

    Now that I think about it, if you really wanted to know, just unscrew and remove one of the hinge cups and we'll then know if it's live or if it's Memorex.
    Actually, I have drilled into them: to install childproofing/puppyproofing safety latches. They're most definitely solid. Not fun trying to get small screws into maple, even with pilot holes.

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