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Thread: How important are rulers in cabinet making?

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    Gabriel,

    For a dive down the rabbit hole, here's a recent thread that may interest you https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....e-cabinetmaker

    In the meantime, you can accomplish a lot with a measuring tape, a bevel gauge, a framing square and an adjustable square. If you find the need, rulers, calipers, dial indicators and the rest will follow.
    Thank you for that, interesting read and I could certainly see myself getting obsessed with precision down the road. I'm detail driven, though I'll have to temper that for my first project.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Bernstein View Post
    I think if one has the option (or luxury) of using fine measuring tools it is a good idea, for many of the reasons already stated in terms of accuracy, repeatability of measurements across various tools, etc... I use a lot of WoodPeckers, Chris Vesper, and Starret intruments. Of course you don't need the fancy stuff. A decent big-box ruler and square will probably do just fine for most things. However, using good measuring tools that may have been expensive to purchase, encourage me to pay more attention to measuring and detail. I think for me at least, this is a big benefit of using good tools.
    I very much like well made tools, regardless of the craft. I'd much rather spend the money once on a good tool and know I can rely on it down the road. I'm also likely to be more inclined to work better with better tools. The psychological benefit is tangible when it causes you to up your game.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myk Rian View Post
    Get a good steel rule, or 2. 15" - 24", and a 4'er. A carpenters square also.
    Also, a set of marking tools such as a scribe and/or chisel tip.

    I won a set of scribes from sawmill creek some years ago for making the 1 millionth post.
    It's something I take very good care of, and made a cherry box for them.

    If you intend on doing precision work, they are a must. Without, this would have been much more difficult to make.

    I think I will buy a couple of PEC rulers off of ebay that are seconds and are about half the price of normal. I'm currently looking at a Starrett combination square as well since it is so versatile.

    That is a beautiful dresser, hopefully someday I'll be able to make a piece like that.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Marusic View Post
    That is a beautiful dresser, hopefully someday I'll be able to make a piece like that.
    Thanks. It's a tool chest.
    Never, under any circumstances, consume a laxative and sleeping pill, on the same night

  5. #65
    I have a set of metal rules I bought from Garrett Wade years ago. I also have Starret squares and use the 6'" Combo all the time. I have assorted rules around the shop, one of which stays on the bench and is painted so I don't take it out for general work. I find that I still use a 6' Lufkin "Inside" folding rule at the bench and it to stays on the bench.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Frederick View Post
    I have a set of metal rules I bought from Garrett Wade years ago. I also have Starret squares and use the 6'" Combo all the time. I have assorted rules around the shop, one of which stays on the bench and is painted so I don't take it out for general work. I find that I still use a 6' Lufkin "Inside" folding rule at the bench and it to stays on the bench.
    I just purchased the Starrett 6" combination square this morning!

  7. #67
    I probably have at least one of all the tools identified by others in this thread, plus scads of inherited high-grade machineist tools. I actually use them all. I also am pathetic when it comes to resisting the measuring tool pimps at Woodpeck. My latest love is a 12" Incra measuring-marking rule. I did not know I needed rough precision down to 1/32", but it turns out to be so. You Should own a Starrett 12" miter rule. Some form of measured try-square tho in truth the Starrett can also handle that, and some form of high quality (as in accurate marking that you can actually read) 12" or better ruler. I reach for my old folding rule regularly, and then regret it because it is an old technology with lots of flaws. From there the odds are on something by Woodpeck or Incra.

    Keep in mind the same disruptive technology growth that has turned over everything else is at work in woodworking as well. While older forms like folding rules, tape measures, etc. maybe a part of the process, new forms have arisen that are considerably better. I now own a [Woodpeck] precision stainless and aluminum modular story-stick thingy that fits in a nice case, and turned a lot of Poplar sticks into stuff used to test the cut on my router table.

    It's contextual as well. I make boxes. I dabble in furniture and other whatnot, but boxes be me. A minute gap in a box seam can be fatal. Square needs to really, really be 90 degrees. A bit off of 45 degrees on a miter can make you truly miserable later in the day. On a larger scale you can fudge things a bit. I made a patio bench once with redwood, a radial arm saw, and yard stick, 30 years ago, and it is still a darn fine patio bench.
    Last edited by John Makar; 05-29-2020 at 11:01 AM.

  8. #68
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    While I don't own anything from Woodpeckers yet, I have been ogling them and really want that 24" T Square. Since posting this thread I purchased a Starrett 6" combination square, a groz machinists square, a PEC 12" ruler, a fastcap tape measure and some 38" straightedge. I do feel like I could use a longer ruler, maybe a 24" or so, and a larger square, machinist or combination. Since I'm dabbling in making cabinets as my first go round, being square is incredibly important to me. I'm trying to reign in my spending, but seemingly always find something I "need".

  9. #69
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    If you want to go BIG, then you can make your own ...





    This is pretty accurate - it is accurate enough for any woodwork. And it has remained this way for several years.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel Marusic View Post
    While I don't own anything from Woodpeckers yet, I have been ogling them and really want that 24" T Square.
    I bought that a couple years ago when I caught a show discount opportunity...mine's the metric equivalent, but obviously the same product otherwise. I haven't really used it much, likely because not long after acquiring it, I bought my CNC, but when it's the right tool, it's the right tool. As previously mentioned, I have multiple steel rules from 6" long up to 40" long so I can select the length that best suits the measuring operation I need to do.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #71
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    You can find metal yardsticks at Lowes and Home Depot.

  12. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Cohen View Post
    If you want to go BIG, then you can make your own ...





    This is pretty accurate - it is accurate enough for any woodwork. And it has remained this way for several years.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek
    I would love to make a square like that. I'll have to look for some plans . What kind of joints did you use?

  13. #73
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    Gabriel, the sides are all held with half-laps. This is a very strong joint as it has a large glue area.

    It is easy to achieve a high level of accuracy with the side flip method for checking squareness. Just plane away the parts that are not.

    This square is very useful when laying out lines and when checking the squareness of a case.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

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