Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 23

Thread: Engraving cement paver with router

  1. #1

    Engraving cement paver with router

    Good afternoon everyone,
    I have a friend that wants a name cement. What kind of bit would you recommend? I have honestly never even thought about it. I know there are v bits for drilling into tile... I'm not expecting this to look like vcarved wood, just something that can be seen..
    Thanks for your help.
    Evan.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,962
    Not sure I'd take this job on with my CNC machine, even with the right tooling, due to the kind of debris and dust produced, etc. And then there is the need to cool the tooling.

    But to your specific question...probably one of the expensive diamond bits would be required at a minimum, if it can be done at all.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
    Posts
    6,135
    I've never been involved with such an undertaking but I'd be inclined to try making a form with the name somehow. I don't know if the letters would be suitably formed and crisp or not. If that didn't work I guess the process would be similar to how letters on stone markers and the like are engraved. Jim is right about the abrasive dust created.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, ON Canada
    Posts
    1,331
    I would think that a diamond drag bit would do it. With them the router is not spinning, so dust and crap would be minimal. They are pricey, though.
    Grant
    Ottawa ON

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Medina Ohio
    Posts
    3,973
    I would cut a mask and sand blast it

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Longmont, CO
    Posts
    583
    you could make a mold from something and paint it well. pour the paver and have a really good looking name. very similar to a concrete countertop. what size is the paver/lettering? you can dye the cement to be many different colors as well.

    the countertop I poured shows every little imperfection from the mold, even the finger marks in the silicone I used to seal the corners.

  7. #7
    Diamond drag is not the answer. I agree with Jerome that sand blasting is best though molding might be easier and cheaper for low volume.
    Mike Null

    St. Louis Laser, Inc.

    Trotec Speedy 300, 80 watt
    Woodworking shop CLTT and Laser Sublimation
    Evolis Card Printer
    CorelDraw X5

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    3,926
    Thinking freaky outside the box (and scary) you could find, buy, build, a tub and come up with some way to rigidly fixture the brick inside the tub then using as long a reach diamond tool (profile of your choice) as you can find, set the tub on the bed of your machine, fixture the tub, fixture the brick, fill the tub with water to cover the brick by 1/2" or so, and machine the brick completely underwater. Very conservative toolpaths even with a big router, it would work and zero dust.

    I'd say it'd be a $500 brick. $750 if its a friend.

    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    3,926
    Better option is to just ship the brick to a laser engraver and have them blast the name in it for 20-30 bucks
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  10. #10
    Thanks for everyone's input, I was able to get out of it by suggesting a small cedar bench flower pot holder with name on the top arch. I must say I'm really intrigued by the idea of engraving under water.... Also does anyone know how many watts it takes with a laser to touch cement?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wayland, MA
    Posts
    1,916
    According to at least one site that sells lasers you need a minimum of an 80 watt CO2 laser. Given that there are dozens of companies that will do it for 20-50 bucks depending on size and complexity I'd sure just send it out to one of them. Unless, of course, you need an excuse to buy a laser.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    According to at least one site that sells lasers you need a minimum of an 80 watt CO2 laser. Given that there are dozens of companies that will do it for 20-50 bucks depending on size and complexity I'd sure just send it out to one of them. Unless, of course, you need an excuse to buy a laser.
    It would be silly to let my wife know that there is a company out there that can do it when I can use it as an excuse to get a new toy...
    Luckily she doesn't know about this site....

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,962
    You better be in really good status with her if you decide to shop for an 80+ watt laser engraver/cutter. LOL ching...ching...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Medina Ohio
    Posts
    3,973
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    You better be in really good status with her if you decide to shop for an 80+ watt laser engraver/cutter. LOL ching...ching...
    Depends on the laser. I got my 130 watt with chiller and rotary delivered for $4000

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Leland, NC
    Posts
    476
    Use a laser with enough power and the concrete will explode. There is this little thing about heat, moisture, expansion, BOOM!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •