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Thread: Shop Layout Help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Southeastern CT
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    106

    Shop Layout Help

    Shown below is a basic sketch of my 3 bay garage to be converted to a shop:

    Screen Shot 2020-04-15 at 7.45.02 PM.jpg

    The basic dimensions of the rectangle (not including the tunnel to be built on the left side) is 31' across the back by 25' depth. Ceilings are 10' 4" high.

    The 3' x 8' bumpout in the back right corner is where I plan to put the Clearvue 1800. It has a left-side intake so the main collection header will run along the back wall.

    The tunnel is being built to limit the sawdust that gets brought in to the house:

    Screen Shot 2020-04-15 at 7.42.18 PM.jpg

    So there will be four doors in the tunnel, the one in the front from the driveway, the one in the rear to the backyard, and one on each long wall - one from shop to the tunnel and one from tunnel to the mudroom. The tunnel is being built with 2x6 joists and 3/4" OSB decking so that it will give me plenty of storage space.

    Not modeled is the air-handler and boiler/hot water heater on the back wall. These supply the in-law apartment above. Also not shown are two windows on the back wall.

    IMG_3243.jpgIMG_6604.jpg

    The walk-in cooler under the air-handler is being relocated outside under the apartment deck.

    So I have a couple questions:

    - I am currently planning on building a removable frame around the boiler/HWH and air-handler and put some type of filter material in the walls of the frame to prevent dust from causing havoc. Any ideas on how to do this?

    - I could use help on how best to locate my equipment. Current thoughts:

    - Put the lathe on the left side wall up against the tunnel wall. The shop side of this entire wall will be 1/2" OSB.
    - Put the PM 15HH planer and PJ 882HH on the opposite wall (right side) on mobile bases and move them away from the wall as needed for use.
    - Bandsaw (yet to be purchased) on the back wall right side
    - Table saw (yet to be purchased) on a mobile base somewhere in the middle.
    - Cabinets on every available wall space.
    - Will need some bench top space for miter saw, etc.


    Anyhow, I could really use some feedback on how best to lay this out to make it efficient, minimize dust into the boiler, etc.

    Thanks,

    Mike

  2. #2
    Don't worry about it too much. Get some stuff in there and get to work. You'll likely rearrange a few times. I used to worry too much about this. As you work in there you'll get a better feel for it. Machines and benches can move around. Work off some electrical cords till you decide on permanent locations. Don't glue your dust collection pipes together yet. As you figure it out you can do permanent wiring, dust collection, shelves, cabinets, etc.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    E TN, near Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Helmich View Post
    Don't worry about it too much. Get some stuff in there and get to work. You'll likely rearrange a few times. I used to worry too much about this. As you work in there you'll get a better feel for it. Machines and benches can move around. Work off some electrical cords till you decide on permanent locations. Don't glue your dust collection pipes together yet. As you figure it out you can do permanent wiring, dust collection, shelves, cabinets, etc.
    Another way is to plan everything ahead of time, but that only works if you have a pretty good idea of what tools you plan and the kind of work you do. For my shop, I went through multiple designs on paper before I even had the walls up and exterior doors up. After everything was done I did do some minor adjustment but basically everything is still where it was on my final plan. Planning ahead let me install the wiring, HVAC, compressed air lines, lighting, and DC before the walls and ceilings went up.

    I like to use a large piece of paper and a number of cutouts to move around. Cutouts included workbenches, storage racks, outfeeds, etc. For clearance between tools, I made mockups of big cardboard boxes and walked through them to determine both the desired and minimum spacing I wanted and made circular cutouts to "walk" through the paper design. This will let you try out lots of different options before committing Although I have expertise in digital design for me the paper method is faster and more effective. I've also heard of people making little wooden blocks to represent tools and move them around in a space for better visualizion.

    This is an example of some planning in progress for one section of the shop. I had all the major tools in storage so I knew the dimensions.

    layout_paper_2.jpg

    After I was happy with the layout, I made pencil drawings in my working notebook. These helped me play were to run circuts and where to place light fixtures, for example to well light the table saw but not reflect glare in my eyes from the polished cast iron top.

    This method won't help much unless you have a pretty good idea of your long term use of the shop or don't have a good idea of the sizes of tools not yet purchased and a good idea of the workflow. Mine was fairly simple since my primary use is woodturning and the tablesaw, jointers, and such for flat work were secondary. Without a clear vision of the final use the method of moving everything in and sliding it around before installing the wiring and DC etc is probably a better idea.

    JKJ

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Colorado Springs
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    290
    Agree w Ben, having built my shop recently and now changed many things. Would not do the tunnel, too much wasted space imo.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Snider View Post
    Would not do the tunnel, too much wasted space imo.
    I agree with this unless there is a very specific and significant health issue you are trying to mitigate.

    My thoughts on arrangement dovetail with both the pre-plan a little with a method like John shows as well as "live with it and expect changes". My shop arrangement has evolved multiple times since 2000 when I started out in the current space and I still tweak things as my work changes and evolves.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
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    Eagle, WI
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    Iím using Johnís approach to lay out possible arrangements for my shop, which is currently under construction. After many iterations, I discovered that the placement of dust collection ductwork was a top concern for efficiency and safety reasons and because I find ductwork less than attractive. Perhaps there is a similar Ďanchorí in your envisioned shop. I agree with Jim that the layout may well get tweaked over time. Playing around with paper cutouts has helped narrow the possibilitiesóat least as far as I can tell right now.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Southeastern CT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I agree with this unless there is a very specific and significant health issue you are trying to mitigate.

    My thoughts on arrangement dovetail with both the pre-plan a little with a method like John shows as well as "live with it and expect changes". My shop arrangement has evolved multiple times since 2000 when I started out in the current space and I still tweak things as my work changes and evolves.
    My wife has severe asthma (over 100 days in the hospital last year), so I absolutely have to minimize the dust that comes in to the house. We enter/exit the house via the garage so the tunnel is needed to minimize her exposure.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    San Diego area
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    If you're using SketchUp for the shop layout I have a bunch of shop tool models you can use?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    WoodsShop

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Hollis View Post
    My wife has severe asthma (over 100 days in the hospital last year), so I absolutely have to minimize the dust that comes in to the house. We enter/exit the house via the garage so the tunnel is needed to minimize her exposure.
    In that case, I'm with you on the "tunnel" to help mitigate any irritation to your spouse's lungs. Professor Dr. SWMBO also has asthma, albeit not severe, so I do understand the challenge and fortunately have a detached building for my shop.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Wood View Post
    If you're using SketchUp for the shop layout I have a bunch of shop tool models you can use?
    Awesome, thanks.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    In that case, I'm with you on the "tunnel" to help mitigate any irritation to your spouse's lungs. Professor Dr. SWMBO also has asthma, albeit not severe, so I do understand the challenge and fortunately have a detached building for my shop.
    I donít have the room for a detached shop and have to make do with the garage. Giving serious thought to an outdoor shower to further minimize dust brought inside.

  12. #12
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    Mar 2006
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    San Diego area
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    OK Mike I put them on dropbox for you https://www.dropbox.com/sh/9wnvamwme...qWWObOwga?dl=0
    WoodsShop

  13. #13
    Given your need for clean air , you'll need air filtration of some sort . I actually use two , with one on 24/7 on low - 0ne used additionally to the first as needed . As you plan for lights , also think about air filtration , where and how many . Thats a good size space .

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Hollis View Post
    I don’t have the room for a detached shop and have to make do with the garage. Giving serious thought to an outdoor shower to further minimize dust brought inside.
    Oh, I understand...I was just relating that since mine is detached, my dust situation is a little easier to manage than if it was attached. The shower idea is interesting, although with you in CT, will be somewhat limited to only a portion of the annual calendar unless you like really cold showers!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #15
    I like the idea of a tunnel. With two outside doors you might be able to cross ventilate it when you're working to help keep the air clean in the tunnel.
    Lots of hanging storage, maybe some shallow shelves.
    I guess you would seal the wall up good and use an exterior door to the shop for dust control? My shop is a nasty dusty mess. That Clearvue should go a long way to keeping your shop clean. Are you lucky enough to be able to put a shop sink in there? Looks like you'll have easy access to hot and cold water. I think you're gonna have a nice shop space!

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